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2017-01-03T00:00:00.000Z

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Rick Slattery

Golf Course Superintendent

Locust Hill Country Club

HQ Phone: (585) 427-7010

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Locust Hill Country Club

2000 Jefferson Road

Pittsford, New York 14534

United States

Company Description

Locust Hill Country Club is a private full service, year round country club which provides a prestigious, yet friendly and welcoming environment for all of its members, their families, and their guests. By doing so, LHCC provides a unique and desirable al ... more

Find other employees at this company (27)

Background Information

Affiliations

Member of the Program
Finger Lakes Association of GCS

Locust Hill Country Club Golf Course Superintendent, GOLF INDUSTRY SHOW
The Environmental Institute for Golf

Member of the Program
Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary

Education

associate's degree

turfgrass management

University of Massachusetts

Web References (47 Total References)


Press / News - 2015 MASTERS PREVIEW

www.locusthill.org [cached]

Rick Slattery, golf course superintendent at Locust Hill Country Club in Rochester, New York, says Augusta is the measuring stick for golf courses and superintendents.

"Whether we like it or not, our golf courses have always been compared to Augusta," Slattery adds.
What's wrong with trying to measure up to the way Augusta appears during Masters week, Slattery asks.
"I've used Augusta as measuring stick throughout my career," he adds. Slattery realizes his course, which has hosted several LPGA tournaments, doesn't have budget and resources that Augusta does. But that doesn't stop him from studying Augusta's nuances in an attempt to become a better superintendent at his own facility.
"The beauty of golf is that it's not played on a regulated sized or shaped playing field," Slattery says.
...
Conditioning aside, Slattery says, Augusta is great for golf, and the Masters' continued popularity only exposes more people to the game.
"The tournament reaches millions of people all over the world. Slattery says. "It's just great exposure for gold. The history of the Masters is second to none."
Slattery remembers watching the Masters on TV when he was a kid, and Big Three - Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus and Gary Player = where duking it out for a green jacket. The Big Three dominated the Masters From 1960 through 1978, winning the event 12 times among them during that span.
"The Masters was one of the most successful golf tournaments brought to TV and had some really exciting finishes that made people fall in love with the game," Slattery says.
...
"Augusta certainly has the resources and exposure to become an effective leader [in the environmental movement]," Slattery says.


Press / News - Locust Hill Country Club

www.locusthill.org [cached]

Locust Hill Course Superintendent Rick Slattery Shows Why He Is A Leader In The Golf Course Industry

...
Please click on the link below to read why our world renowned Golf Course Superintendent Rick Slattery is sought after for his valued opinion.


Locust Hill Course Superintendent ...

www.locusthill.org [cached]

Locust Hill Course Superintendent Rick Slattery Shows Why He Is A Leader In The Golf Course Industry

...
"[The studies] show that the golf course industry is being proactive," Rick Slattery, Golf Course Superintendent of Locust Hill Country Club in Rochester, N.Y., says.
...
At his 18-hole private golf course, Slattery follows the philosophy that simple things make a big difference in water management. "The first thing we do every spring is a complete audit of the irrigation system," he reports. "We test for leaks and make sure the heads are directed properly. During the season, we scout the golf course constantly. We look for areas that are getting too much or too little water, and we do not water until the last possible minute. We try to go from rainfall to rainfall."
Rick Slattery, Golf Course Superintendent, Locust Hill CC
It must be working: Locust Hill has reduced its water output by 75% in the last 20 years, Slattery reports. While a high-end golf course in the Northeast can use 20 million to 25 million gallons of water a year, he says, Locust Hill CC uses 5 million to 7 million gallons of water annually.
A key to achieving these goals is to "know your golf course," Slattery emphasizes. In addition, the longtime superintendent, who has been at Locust Hill for 20-plus years, still recalls something he was told in the 1970s: "The best-looking golf courses year-round are the ones that held off watering as long as possible in the spring."
Slattery relies on other tactics to reduce water usage as well. He watches weather radar closely, looks at rainfall amounts, and pays attention to long-and short-term weather reports. "Irrigating around the weather, rather than the calendar, is key," he stresses.
At Locust Hill CC, maintenance tasks such as topdressing are timed around weather reports and performed before a rainfall, eliminating the need to water products into the turf. Slattery relies on the property's on-site weather station as well. "You can monitor evapotranspiration [ET] so you know how much water you've lost during the day and how much you need to water to replace it," he explains.
...
Nevertheless, Golf Course Superintendent Rick Slattery has to file a water withdrawal report each year with the state Department of Environmental Conservation, which collects information about the ways water is being used.
...
"The industry finally got the technology right for irrigation systems then," Slattery says.
...
When Slattery first came to Locust Hill, poa made up 80% to 90% of the turf. Now, however, 80% to 90% of the course is less-thirsty bentgrass. This transition has been a key to how the club has decreased the amount of water used annually for irrigation by 23 million gallons since 1995, while also cutting pesticide and fertilizer use by more than half.
In addition to new turf varieties that require less water, golf courses are increasing natural vegetation in out-of-play areas for further conservation.
With about 4.5 acres of native areas on Locust Hill's golf course, Slattery explains, "It eliminates all inputs in these areas and in the rough.
...
Regardless of how a course is used, golfers need to accept the maintenance practices that are now necessary for course upkeep, Slattery adds. "In the 1970s and 1980s, golfers never used to critique a golf course by whether the greens held or not," he says.
...
"The less water you use, the healthier turf you have," says Slattery.
...
You have to keep talking about it," says Slattery, who also sends weekly e-blasts to members.
...
"It's important to have third-party verification in the industry," reports Slattery.


Rick Slattery, left, ...

www.superintendentmagazine.com [cached]

Rick Slattery, left, superintendent at Locust Hill Country Club, pictured here, says he uses Augusta's conditioning as a measuring stick.PHOTOS COURTESY OF RICK SLATTERY

"It's hallowed ground," he says.
...
Rick Slattery, golf course superintendent at Locust Hill Country Club in Rochester, New York, says Augusta is the measuring stick for golf courses and superintendents.
"Whether we like it or not, our golf courses have always been compared to Augusta," Slattery adds.
What's wrong with trying to measure up to they way Augusta appears during Masters week, Slattery asks.
"I've used Augusta as a measuring stick throughout my career," he adds.
Slattery realizes his course, which has hosted several LPGA tournaments, doesn't have the budget and resources that Augusta does. But that doesn't stop him from studying Augusta's nuances in an attempt to become a better superintendent at his own facility.
"The beauty of golf is that it's not played on a regulated sized or shaped playing field," Slattery says.
...
Conditioning aside, Slattery says, Augusta is great for golf, and the Masters' continued popularity only exposes more people to the game.
"The tournament reaches millions of people all over the world," Slattery says.
...
"The Masters was one of the most successful golf tournaments brought to TV and had some really exciting finishes that made people fall in love with the game," Slattery says.
...
"Augusta certainly has the resources and exposure to become an effective leader [in the environmental movement]," Slattery says.


Rick Slattery | Golf Course ...

www.superintendentmagazine.com [cached]

Rick Slattery | Golf Course Superintendent Locust Hill Country Club

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