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Rick Dell, Baseball Coach, The College of New Jersey

Last Update

2014-07-26T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Rick Dell?

Mr. Rick Dell

Baseball Coach

The College of New Jersey

HQ Phone: (609) 771-1855

The College of New Jersey

200 Pennington Road

Ewing, New Jersey 08628

United States

Company Description

The College of New Jersey, a primarily undergraduate institution, provides academically prepared students with a challenging education and a rewarding residential experience, small classes and a prestigious faculty. TCNJ has been recognized nationally for... more

Find other employees at this company (5,206)

Background Information

Employment History

Director Baseball Development, Asia

Major League Baseball

Director Baseball Development, Asia

Kansas City Royals

Head Baseball Coach

TCNJ Foundation

Affiliations

Committee Member
American Baseball Coaches Association

Member of ADVISORY BOARD
The Atlantic Baseball Confederation Collegiate League

Web References (189 Total References)


Among them, he names The ...

www.njbaseballmag.com [cached]

Among them, he names The College of New Jersey (TCNJ) head coach Rick Dell, Princeton head coach Scott Bradley, and Bayside Yankees coach Marc Cuseta.


Will Chinese Baseball Make it to the Big Leagues? | Justin Bergman

justinbergman.com [cached]

Then, in this Chinese version of Field of Dreams, came the players, each with a nickname bestowed by their American coach, Rick Dell: V.B., or Volleyball Boy, a lanky 14-year-old from Jiangsu province whose mother was a volleyball player; Xiao (Little) Baby Ruth, the pudgy catcher and joker of the team; and Tony, who Dell says "looks like a little Italian guy" from far away.

...
Then, in this Chinese version of Field of Dreams, came the players, each with a nickname bestowed by their American coach, Rick Dell: V.B., or Volleyball Boy, a lanky 14-year-old from Jiangsu province whose mother was a volleyball player; Xiao (Little) Baby Ruth, the pudgy catcher and joker of the team; and Tony, who Dell says "looks like a little Italian guy" from far away.
...
"The first time most kids had been on a baseball field was the first day we had practice," says Dell, who was head baseball coach at the College of New Jersey for 27 years before moving to China to oversee the development program. Two years later, officials were able to travel the country to scout talent for the Changzhou center, recruiting youngsters from as far away as Qinghai province in the west, where the game is popular among Tibetans, to Guangdong province in the south and Beijing in the north. "There are independent pockets of baseball that are popping up ... that are being initiated by interested individuals who might be Korean or Chinese Americans or Americans," Dell says.
...
The light is fading, and Dell calls the game.
Bama, whose nickname sounds like his Tibetan name, Huadan Banma, says afterward that he started playing only three years ago and that his dream is to one day make it to MLB like his idol, Alex Rodriguez. "If I can succeed, I want to earn lots of money that I can use to help others," he says quietly. But even if there aren't any future major leaguers on the field today, Dell says, baseball is making inroads. "We've done things slowly and deliberately," he says.


A long way from sea level ...

www.netshrine.com [cached]

A long way from sea level and ever farther from New Jersey, Rick Dell is standing on a ballfield in the central Chinese city of Chengdu, not quite fathoming what he is seeing.

Chengdu is famous for its pandas, but what is wowing Rick Dell is its pitchers. Surrounded by 47 Chinese ballplayers, most of them kids who didn't know a seam from a shortstop a few years earlier, Dell is admiring the long-limbed fluidity, the mechanical soundness, of one pitcher after another.
...
"It's almost beyond comprehension that the Chinese players could be as far advanced as they are after playing the game for such a short time," says Dell, whose day job is as baseball coach at the College of New Jersey in Trenton.
...
A sort of baseball Johnny Appleseed, Dell's mission is to increase that number - and it's working.
...
Dell has spent the past two summers in China, teaching the game and passing on his love for it. He'll make his third trip next summer, when he heads to Guangdong with a team of eight college and high school coaches. Dell says an acute shortage of knowledgeable coaches, and a dearth of game experience, are the biggest obstacles Chinese ballplayers have to overcome.
He believes the establishment of the pro league will be an immense boost. The plan is to expand the league to 10 cities within a few years. Baseball will finally begin to be woven into the fabric of daily life.
"You have to have people for kids to emulate," Dell says.
...
Adds Dell, "In 20 years I don't think it will be uncommon to have Chinese players on major league rosters. And when you consider the population base they have, they could, down the road, be as prominent in baseball as the U.S., Japan, Taiwan or the Latin American countries."
The paucity of game experience, for now, still makes the game go too fast for even the best Chinese ballplayers. Dell says it's common to see guys get panicky, to rush their movements. That will subside the more they play. It shouldn't take long. Dell was stunned when he introduced a group of pitchers in Chengdu to the circle changeup and they were throwing it effectively three days later.


A long way from sea level ...

www.netshrine.com [cached]

A long way from sea level and ever farther from New Jersey, Rick Dell is standing on a ballfield in the central Chinese city of Chengdu, not quite fathoming what he is seeing.

Chengdu is famous for its pandas, but what is wowing Rick Dell is its pitchers. Surrounded by 47 Chinese ballplayers, most of them kids who didn't know a seam from a shortstop a few years earlier, Dell is admiring the long-limbed fluidity, the mechanical soundness, of one pitcher after another.
...
"It's almost beyond comprehension that the Chinese players could be as far advanced as they are after playing the game for such a short time," says Dell, whose day job is as baseball coach at the College of New Jersey in Trenton.
...
A sort of baseball Johnny Appleseed, Dell's mission is to increase that number - and it's working.
...
Dell has spent the past two summers in China, teaching the game and passing on his love for it. He'll make his third trip next summer, when he heads to Guangdong with a team of eight college and high school coaches. Dell says an acute shortage of knowledgeable coaches, and a dearth of game experience, are the biggest obstacles Chinese ballplayers have to overcome.
He believes the establishment of the pro league will be an immense boost. The plan is to expand the league to 10 cities within a few years. Baseball will finally begin to be woven into the fabric of daily life.
"You have to have people for kids to emulate," Dell says.
...
Adds Dell, "In 20 years I don't think it will be uncommon to have Chinese players on major league rosters. And when you consider the population base they have, they could, down the road, be as prominent in baseball as the U.S., Japan, Taiwan or the Latin American countries."
The paucity of game experience, for now, still makes the game go too fast for even the best Chinese ballplayers. Dell says it's common to see guys get panicky, to rush their movements. That will subside the more they play. It shouldn't take long. Dell was stunned when he introduced a group of pitchers in Chengdu to the circle changeup and they were throwing it effectively three days later.


A long way from sea level ...

www.netshrine.com [cached]

A long way from sea level and ever farther from New Jersey, Rick Dell is standing on a ballfield in the central Chinese city of Chengdu, not quite fathoming what he is seeing.

Chengdu is famous for its pandas, but what is wowing Rick Dell is its pitchers. Surrounded by 47 Chinese ballplayers, most of them kids who didn't know a seam from a shortstop a few years earlier, Dell is admiring the long-limbed fluidity, the mechanical soundness, of one pitcher after another.
...
"It's almost beyond comprehension that the Chinese players could be as far advanced as they are after playing the game for such a short time," says Dell, whose day job is as baseball coach at the College of New Jersey in Trenton.
...
A sort of baseball Johnny Appleseed, Dell's mission is to increase that number - and it's working.
...
Dell has spent the past two summers in China, teaching the game and passing on his love for it. He'll make his third trip next summer, when he heads to Guangdong with a team of eight college and high school coaches. Dell says an acute shortage of knowledgeable coaches, and a dearth of game experience, are the biggest obstacles Chinese ballplayers have to overcome.
He believes the establishment of the pro league will be an immense boost. The plan is to expand the league to 10 cities within a few years. Baseball will finally begin to be woven into the fabric of daily life.
"You have to have people for kids to emulate," Dell says.
...
Adds Dell, "In 20 years I don't think it will be uncommon to have Chinese players on major league rosters. And when you consider the population base they have, they could, down the road, be as prominent in baseball as the U.S., Japan, Taiwan or the Latin American countries."
The paucity of game experience, for now, still makes the game go too fast for even the best Chinese ballplayers. Dell says it's common to see guys get panicky, to rush their movements. That will subside the more they play. It shouldn't take long. Dell was stunned when he introduced a group of pitchers in Chengdu to the circle changeup and they were throwing it effectively three days later.

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