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This profile was last updated on 8/20/13  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. Richard C. Henderson

Wrong Dr. Richard C. Henderson?

Professor

University of North Carolina
101 Manning Dr
Chapel Hill , North Carolina 27514
United States

Company Description:
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

Education

  • MD
  • PhD , Physiology
    University of Chicago
  • MD degree
    University of Chicago
  • PhD Degree , Physiology
    University of Chicago
33 Total References
Web References
History of Boone NC County - MAP Realty
www.maprealtyboone.com, 1 Oct 1998 [cached]
Although the purchase of Indian lands by white men had been prohibited by royal proclamation[12] as early as October 7, 1763, and although much of the territory was in the actual possession of the Indians, Richard Henderson and eight other private citizens determined to buy a large tract of land in Kentucky and the northern part of Middle Tennessee. To anticipate somewhat, it may be here stated that this intention was carried out but afterwards repudiated by both Virginia, which claimed the Kentucky portion, and North Carolina, which claimed the Tennessee tract, and Henderson and his associates were partially compensated by grants of much smaller bodies of land;[13] nevertheless, at the treaty of Hopewell, S. C., on the Keowee river, fifteen miles above its junction with the Tugabo, on the 18th of December, 1785, Benjamin Hawkins, Andrew Pickens, Joseph Martin and Lachlan Campbell, commissioners representing the United States, had the face to deny the claim of the Indians to this identical territory- contending that they had already sold it to Henderson and associates.[14] To anticipate somewhat, it may be here stated that this intention was carried out but afterwards repudiated by both Virginia, which claimed the Kentucky portion, and North Carolina, which claimed the Tennessee tract, and Henderson and his associates were partially compensated by grants of much smaller bodies of land;[13] nevertheless, at the treaty of Hopewell, S. C., on the Keowee river, fifteen miles above its junction with the Tugabo, on the 18th of December, 1785, Benjamin Hawkins, Andrew Pickens, Joseph Martin and Lachlan Campbell, commissioners representing the United States, had the face to deny the claim of the Indians to this identical territory- contending that they had already sold it to Henderson and associates.[14]
...
Richard Henderson, who, struck with Boone's intelligence, and the opportunity for fortune offered by the new lands south of the Ohio, since known as Kentucky, organized a company, and employed Boone in 1763 to spy out the country[15] . . . Years passed before it took final shape.
...
But in 1768 Henderson had been appointed a judge; which position he held till 1773 and which probably delayed his land scheme; but in 1774 Nathaniel Hart, one of Henderson's partners, journeyed to the Otari towns to open negotiations with the Cherokees for the grant of suitable territory for a colony of whites. On March 17, 1775, the Overhill Cherokees assembled at the Sycamore Shoals of the Watauga, pursuant to an order of their chief, Oconostata, where a treaty was made and signed by him and two other chiefs, Savanookoo and Little Carpenter (Atta. Culla Culla), by which, in consideration of ?12,000 in goods, the Cherokees granted the lands between the Kentucky and Cumberland rivers, embracing one-half of what is now Kentucky and a part of Tennessee. But Dragging Canoe, a chief, had opposed a treaty for four days, and never consented to it. The share of one brave was only one shirt. But, the Cherokees had no title to convey, as this land was a battle-ground where the hostile tribes met and fought out their differences. Besides, this conveyance of the land by Indians was unlawful under both the British and colonial laws. Henderson called this grant Transylvania.
...
Dr. Archibald Henderson, a descendant of Richard Henderson, published in the Charlotte (Sunday) Observer, between the 16th of March and the 1st of June, 1913, a series of articles entitled "Life and Times of Richard Henderson," in which much absolutely new matter is introduced, and numerous mistakes have been corrected in what has hitherto been accepted as history.
...
It is especially valuable regarding the Regulators' agitation and the part therein borne by Richard Henderson. Dr. Henderson is a member of the faculty of the University of North Carolina, of the State Library and Historical Association, and of the American Historical Association, and in the forthcoming volume, soon to appear, he will put the result of years of study and research into permanent form. He may be relied on to give adequate authority for every statement of importance concerning his remarkable kinsman and the times in which he lived.
HENDERSON'S SHARE IN BOONE'S EXPLORATIONS. Roosevelt, Ramsey and other historians have related the bare fact that Boone went on his first trip into Kentucky in 1764 at the instance of Richard Henderson; but in these papers the details of the association of the two men are set forth.
...
Certainly as early as 1763, Boone and Henderson, then a lawyer, met, and discussed the territory lying to the west of the mountains.
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Before Richard Henderson's appointment as judge by Governor Tryon in 1768, he and Hart and Williams had engaged Boone to spy out the western lands for them as early as 1764, though the proclamation of George IV, in 1763, forbidding the Eastern Colonists to settle on lands west of the Blue Ridge, may have retarded their plans for "securing title to vast tracts of western lands, and no move was made by Henderson to that end until after the treaty of Fort Stanwix in 1768, by which Great Britain had acquired by purchase from the Six Nations their unwarranted claim to all the territory east and southeast of the Ohio and north of the Tennessee rivers, which territory had always been claimed by the Cherokees, and that country was then known as "Cherokee."[26]
...
Before Richard Henderson's appointment as judge by Governor Tryon in 1768, he and Hart and Williams had engaged Boone to spy out the western lands for them as early as 1764, though the proclamation of George IV, in 1763, forbidding the Eastern Colonists to settle on lands west of the Blue Ridge, may have retarded their plans for "securing title to vast tracts of western lands, and no move was made by Henderson to that end until after the treaty of Fort Stanwix in 1768, by which Great Britain had acquired by purchase from the Six Nations their unwarranted claim to all the territory east and southeast of the Ohio and north of the Tennessee rivers, which territory had always been claimed by the Cherokees, and that country was then known as "Cherokee."[26]
...
Dr. Henderson insists that the King's proclamation forbidding the acquisition of Indian lands by the settlers was universally disregarded by the settlers of the east. And while he points out that Richard Henderson obtained an "opinion, handed down by the Lord Chancellor and the Attorney General," which "cleared away the legal difficulties" in the way of securing "an indisputable title from the Indian owners and...to surmount the far more serious obstacle of Royal edict against the purchase of lands from the Indians by private individuals, he would doutbless have been justified in his purchase by the popular sentiment of the day in view of the universal disregard of the Royal Proclamation of 1763. Dr. Henderson points out that "George Washington expressed the secret belief of the period when he hazarded the judgment that the Royal Proclamation of 1763 was a mere temporary expedient to quiet the Indians, and was not intended as a permanent bar to Western Civilization. . . . George Washington, acquiring vast tracts of western land by secret purchase, indirectly stimulated the powerful army that was carrying the broadax westward. . . . It is no reflection upon the fame of George Washington to point out that, of the two, the service to the nation of Richard Henderson in promoting western civilization was vastly more generous in its nature and far-reaching in its results than the more selfish and prudent aims of Washington."[28]
HENDERSON'S TITLE. "The valid ownership of the territory being [now] actually vested in the Cherokees, Henderson foresaw that the lands could be acquired only by lease or by purchase from that tribe, and he forthwith set about acquiring an accurate knowledge of the territory in question. To get this information the services of Daniel Boone were secured, and the latter must have "conferred with Judge Henderson at Salisbury where he was presiding over the Superior Court, and plans were 500fl outlined for Boone's journey and expedition.
...
At this time Boone was very poor and his desire to pay off his indebtedness to Henderson [lawyer's fees] made him all the more ready to undertake the exhaustive tour of exploration in company with Finley and others"; but "at the time of Boone's return to North Carolina Judge Henderson was embroiled in the exciting issues of the Regulation.
...
At this time Boone was very poor and his desire to pay off his indebtedness to Henderson [lawyer's fees] made him all the more ready to undertake the exhaustive tour of exploration in company with Finley and others"; but "at the time of Boone's return to North Carolina Judge Henderson was embroiled in the exciting issues of the Regulation.
...
HENDERSON AND DANIEL BOONE.
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It was not until the creative and executive brain of Richard Henderson was applied to the vast and daring project of Western colonization that it was carried through to a successful termination."[30]
...
Application was then made to the Virginia convention at Williamsburg for recognition, but the effort of Henderson, assisted by Thomas Burke, was "defeated chiefly through the opposition of two remarkable men George Rogers Clark, who represented the rival settlement of Harrodsburg in Kentucky, and Patrick Henry, who sought to extend in all directions the power and extent of the 'Anci
Richard Henderson, MD, ...
www.aacpdm.org, 1 Jan 2009 [cached]
Richard Henderson, MD, PhD
...
Richard Henderson, MD, PhD
...
Richard Henderson, is currently Professor of Orthopaedics and Pediatrics at the University of North Carolina. He received his PhD (in Physiology) and MD degrees from the University of Chicago, and then completed his orthopaedic residency at the University of Iowa. He has been a clinically active Pediatric Orthopaedic surgeon on the medical school faculty at the University of North Carolina since 1985.
Dr. Henderson's busy clinical practice covers the full range of pediatric orthopaedic conditions including such things as clubfoot, neuromuscular disorders, hip dysplasia, pediatric trauma, and spinal deformities. His primary research interest for nearly 2 decades has focused on the impact of various medical and physical conditions on skeletal growth and development, particularly as it relates to bone density and skeletal fragility. He was a founding member of the North American Growth in Cerebral Palsy Project, which is a clinical research collaboration that has investigated multiple issues related to growth, nutrition, and health in children with CP. He has over 70 peer-review publications, and his research has received support from the United Cerebral Palsy Research and Education Foundation, the NIH, and several other agencies.
The beginning of our tent show ...
www.parsonspeavinefestival.com, 3 Oct 2010 [cached]
The beginning of our tent show can be traced to its original founder, Richard Henderson, who formed the Henderson Stock Company on December 8, 1898 in Otsego, Michigan. Henderson formed the company with the intention of temporarily employing himself and his out-of-work actor friends. Henderson successfully toured his company until his retirement in 1934.
ASQRS.org American Society for Quality Rochester Section 0204
www.asqrs.org, 7 Sept 2012 [cached]
Richard Henderson Past Chair rchender01@gmail.com
...
Richard Henderson Professional Organization Liaison rchender01@gmail.com
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