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This profile was last updated on 11/23/15  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

President

Phone: (612) ***-****  
Email: r***@***.edu
Dunwoody College of Technology
818 Dunwoody Boulevard
Minneapolis , Minnesota 55403
United States

Company Description: Founded in 1914, Dunwoody College of Technology has trained more than 250,000 men and women for technical careers. Named one of the top technical schools in the...   more
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

Education

  • doctorate , educational policy and administration
    University of Minnesota
  • bachelor of science
    University of the State of New York
  • master’s degree , business administration
    Crummer Graduate School of Business at Rollins College
  • Ph.D.
32 Total References
Web References
ATEA - Board of Trustees List
www.ateaonline.org, 21 Jan 2015 [cached]
President: Rich Wagner, President Dunwoody College of Technology, Minneapolis, Minnesota
"I look forward to continuing to help ATEA as the advocate for the importance of technical education to the U.S. economy. I will use my ATEA presidency to continue to make the case for the value of applied learning to improve lives, businesses and communities. The modern workforce requires that technicians, salespersons and managers all have practical, hands-on skills, critical thinking skills and the ability to communicate well with others. All of us associated with ATEA have the honor of continuing to educate the people of America, serve the needs of industry, share best practices and demonstrate the value of technical education and technical educators to the higher education ecosystem and American society as a whole."
ATEA President Rich Wagner
Dunwoody College of Technology President Rich Wagner is the ninth president of Dunwoody. He has served in that role since July 1, 2009. He served as vice president of the Board of Trustees of the American Technical Education Association before becoming president. He earned a doctorate in educational policy and administration from the University of Minnesota. He holds a master’s degree in business administration from the Crummer Graduate School of Business at Rollins College in Winter Park, Fla., and a bachelor of science from the University of the State of New York in Albany. Prior to entering higher education, President Wagner served 10 years in the U.S. Navy, including five years as an electrician/technical supervisor on a nuclear submarine.
Dunwoody College of Technology ...
www.minnesotabusiness.com, 20 Oct 2015 [cached]
Dunwoody College of Technology President Rich Wagner talks about the state's workforce challenges
By Rich Wagner
...
Here, President Rich Wagner writes exclusively for Minnesota Business on the state's workforce challenges and what can be done to close the skills gap.
President of the American Technical ...
www.ateaonline.org, 21 Jan 2015 [cached]
President of the American Technical Education Board of Trustees, Rich Wagner, Ph.D., President of Dunwoody College of Technology, Minneapolis MN
Rich Wagner, president of ...
www.civiccaucus.org, 29 May 2015 [cached]
Rich Wagner, president of Dunwoody College of Technology, Minneapolis
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John Adams, Dave Broden (vice chair), Pat Davies, Paul Gilje (executive director), Sallie Kemper (associate director), Dan Loritz (chair), Paul Ostrow, Bill Rudelius, Dana Schroeder (associate director), Rich Wagner.
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Minnesota's currently vibrant economy is in a lot of trouble if other states are doing a better job of preparing their workforces to meet the needs of employers, cautions Rich Wagner, president of Dunwoody College of Technology in Minneapolis. Minnesota has always prided itself in having a well-educated and well-trained workforce. But he asks when the last time was that a manufacturing company came to Minnesota and discusses the type of workforce training that drew Volkswagen to locate a new factory in Chattanooga.
Wagner asserts that the skills gap in Minnesota-between jobs available for skilled people and the number of people qualified for those jobs-is a major problem at all skill levels for every industry across the board. He believes training institutions are not producing enough skilled workers to meet employers' needs. He says a critical first step to increase the workforce talent pool is to graduate all of our kids from high school.
Dunwoody takes a different approach from most schools, Wagner says, in hiring its faculty and in helping students who need remedial help.
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Richard J. Wagner is the ninth president of Dunwoody College of Technology in Minneapolis. He has served in that role since July 1, 2009.
Wagner joined Dunwoody in 1996 as an electrical instructor.
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In 2004, Wagner left Dunwoody to serve as vice president for learning and academic innovation at Hennepin Technical College.
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Wagner earned a doctorate in educational policy and administration from the University of Minnesota. He holds a master's degree in business administration from the Crummer Graduate School of Business at Rollins College in Winter Park, Fla., and a B.S. degree from the State University of New York in Albany. Prior to entering higher education, Wagner served 10 years in the U.S. Navy, including five years as an electrician/technical supervisor on a nuclear submarine.
He is past president of the board of trustees of the American Technical Education Association and a member of the Minnesota Governor's Workforce Development Council.
Background The Civic Caucus has released two recent statements on human capital: one in September 2014 laying out the human-capital challenges facing the state today and in coming years and a follow-up paper in January 2015 offering recommendations for maintaining a high-quality workforce in Minnesota. The Civic Caucus interviewed Rich Wagner to learn more about Dunwoody College and its approach to preparing students for the workforce through certificate programs and two-year and four-year degree programs.
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Wagner noted that there are 10 two-year Minnesota State Colleges and Universities (MnSCU) schools in the metro area. There have been over 40 private, for-profit institutions in the area, such as Rasmussen College, Globe University, Brown Institute, University of Phoenix, etc.
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Rich Wagner said during the following few years, the school focused on its mission of helping students and started exploring what it needs to do today to lock in another 100 years. (The school celebrated its 100th year in 2014.)
The college decided to implement a combination of strategies going forward to meet the needs of the Minnesota workforce, expand the offering of STEM programs by focusing on a new School of Engineering and help raise the profile of technical education to promote more interest in technical careers.
One part of the strategy is to take its existing programs to underserved and underrepresented students. Wagner said that this initiative is focused on attracting more women, people of color and students from outside the Twin Cities and even outside Minnesota. He said the college thinks recruiting students from these three markets is a good strategy to bolster its existing programs.
One of the implications of reaching out to a larger geographic area, Wagner said, is the issue of where students from outside the Twin Cities area are going to live. He said Dunwoody is currently working on establishing a residency program. It wouldn't involve residence halls, but might include partnering with apartment buildings or developers or sharing living facilities with other colleges.
Another element of Dunwoody's strategy is to meet student's educational needs along the continuum of their career. The college started offering 2 + 2 programs in 2007, Wagner explained.
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Wagner said the school feels its growth will come from new programs that will bring new students to help close the skills gap. And it must serve the Twin Cities market. Dunwoody's tuition is $18,000 a year, so its students must earn a good wage when they graduate, he said.
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Dunwoody decided to start a school of engineering, Wagner said, that will be different.
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"We hear from our employers that they'll take our entire class of machinists or construction managers," Wagner said. "While it sounds good for us, it's bad for us, because we're not meeting the needs of industry."
The constraint that prevents expansion of programs is primarily student and parent interest. Wagner explained that parents who are both educated are going to convince their high school senior to go to a four-year college, rather than a two-year technical college. He suggested that an education model for parents to consider is to send their kids to Dunwoody at age 18. The students get a good value at Dunwoody at $18,000 a year and after two years, they can get a job at $40,000 a year. They can earn some money for a few years and then come back for a bachelor's degree at night and their company will help pay for it. "It's a pretty good model," Wagner said.
The press seems to talk about workforce issues as if the skills gap-between jobs available for skilled people and the number of people qualified for those jobs--doesn't exist. Wagner said a Dunwoody board member in the medical device industry says he can't find machinists, welders, or engineering designers and drafters. "It's not just the skilled trades," Wagner said. "It's every industry across the board."
We must graduate all of our kids from high school. "If we did that," Wagner said, "we wouldn't have a pipeline problem. If we fix that problem, we'll have a bigger talent pool," he said.
Another problem is the lack of career and technical education (CTE) in high schools. CTE is expensive and it's easy to let those programs go, Wagner said, but we need more CTE in high schools.
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Dunwoody goes into the high schools and recruits students during their junior year, Wagner said.
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Wagner said Right Skills Now is a one-semester certificate program that trains people to go in as entry-level machine-tool operators, ensuring companies get the skills they need now.
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Wagner said the college has a "very robust teaching program" with the University of Wisconsin-Stout to train new faculty members how to teach.
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Wagner said wages have been fairly stagnant since the recession ended, but are now starting to go up. However, he noted, there are some industries, such as the auto industry, that haven't responded by raising their entry-level wages. "The solution has to come from industry," he said.
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Wagner said the challenge those schools face is their sheer size and bureaucracy.
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"I hope we don't dilute the career-technical aspect of MnSCU two-year schools, just because it's less expensive to run the transfer programs," Wagner said. "That would be bad for the technical workforce we so desperately need."
Geographic expansion is not Dunwoody's strategic driver right now. Wagner said employers in Winsted, Minn., told Dunwoody they needed more welders, so the college opened a welding facility there last year that is putting welders right into the workforce. He said several other mayors who would like the school to have a presence in their cities have approached the college. "We won't rule it out, but it's not our strategic driver now," Wagner said. "We have a campus plan to develop all of the 14 acres we own. When we fill that up, we'll look at expansion."
The key piece is teaching students how to learn. Wagner said Dunwoody's challenge is, as technology in the workforce changes, to be training technicians who can function in that technology. And as technology changes, he believes the college must be offering evening and weekend continuing education.
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"We use intrusive advising," Wagner said.
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Wagner asked.
Dunwoody College of Technology ...
www.minnesotabusiness.com, 1 Oct 2014 [cached]
Dunwoody College of Technology President Rich Wagner talks about the state's workforce challenges Read More
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