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This profile was last updated on 5/27/06  and contains information from public web pages.

Reverdy C. Ransom

Wrong Reverdy C. Ransom?

Bishop

Phone: (615) ***-****  HQ Phone
African Methodist Episcopal Church
500 8Th Avenue South
Nashville, Tennessee 37203
United States

Company Description: The Mission of the African Methodist Episcopal Church is to minister to the spiritual, intellectual, physical, emotional, and environmental needs of all people by...   more
Background

Employment History

  • W. E. B. Du Bois

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Founder
    Niagara Movement
  • Founder
    ICSS
7 Total References
Web References
Vernon Johns 7 Black Social Gospel
www.vernonjohns.org, 27 May 2006 [cached]
Reverdy Ransom
Ransom (Anderson 1982:21) was a black man with fair skin, reddish hair, and a face that was often as stern as a schoolmaster's. Ransom was both a minister and one of the most radical black activists of his time. He was born in Ohio during the Civil War.
Ransom (Luker 1991:173-174) studied at Oberlin and heard the social gospel from the likes of Joseph Cook, John B. Gough, and Thomas De Witt Talmadge.
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In 1899, when news arrived of a recent lynching in the South, Ransom (Anderson 1982:22) delivered an aggressive sermon at the St. John's A.M.E. Church in Cleveland. He advised blacks to become skilled in the handling of dynamite and use it when attacked, for the protection of their homes and lives. It is hardly surprising that in 1905 Ransom was one of the progressives who joined W. E. B. Du Bois in forming the Niagara Movement, the nucleus of the NAACP, which was founded four years latter.
In 1924 he became a bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, which was once regarded as the most racially militant of all black religious organizations in America. In the pulpit and on secular platforms, Ransom displayed the militant traditions of his church as well as the extemporaneous power and fluency of nineteenth-century oratory.
Blacks and the Progressive Movement: Emergence of a New Synthesis | Jimmie Franklin | Gilded Age | OAH Magazine of History
www.oah.org, 1 Mar 2006 [cached]
Among the black clergy, Reverdy Ransom stood out as the most celebrated clergy member of the Progressive Era. A powerful preacher and social activist, Ransom studied at Wilberforce, Ohio, where he came under the influence of teachers who saw the church as an instrument for altering American society and the black community. For them the church had to remain the social center of black life, a means of social control, and, potentially, a medium for black enfranchisement and political participation. Ransom's professors taught that service to others was a Christian obligation, and they stressed that salvation rested upon social responsibility and good works. Ransom learned to exalt systematic inquiry, research, institutional organization, and the role of government in the resolution of societal problems. If one could craft a stereotype, Ransom was a classic Social Gospel progressive of the age (9).
Ransom rose to become a bishop in the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church in the 1920s, but his most enduring work took place during the first two decades of the twentieth century. As a minister in Cleveland, he created programs for the development of young children, established a men's club in his church to carry out community activities, and appointed a Board of Deaconesses, to the chagrin of more conservative males. A literary society sponsored debates and lectures on local and national issues. When the minister moved to Bethel Church in Chicago, he joined forces with black and white reformers including activist Ida Wells-Barnett who had gone to Chicago from Memphis, the noted lawyer Clarence Darrow, and Jane Addams of Hull House. Ransom's church started an industrial school for children, a kindergarten, and programs to provide for the needs of people who lived in the church's district. Wells-Barnett recalled that Ransom had an abiding concern for the sick, the poor, and the needy (10).
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Ransom transferred the tenets of the Social Gospel into his best remembered endeavor: the Institutional Church and Social Settlement (ICSS).
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Ransom believed that the black church needed to provide more than worship service and spiritual food for black migrants who had already begun to move into the city. Thus, he founded ICSS more than a decade before the formation of the National Urban League.
Although technically under the auspices of the AME Church, Ransom's creation had a mission broader than the parent organization. He presided over a structure that offered a variety of activities, including an employment bureau, print shop, kindergarten and nursery, and an athletic gymnasium that held 1,200 people. Ransom's ICSS not only served the needs of Chicago's poor, but helped pave the way for the establishment of institutional churches and settlements in other localities. Through his leadership, Ransom advanced Social Gospel activity within the black community by mentoring persons such as R. R. Wright, who became a bishop in the AME Church, and George Haynes, a sociologist who was a founder of the National Urban League in 1911 (11).
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9. The most useful full-length study of Ransom is Calvin S. Morris, Reverdy C. Ransom: Black Advocate of the Social Gospel (Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1990).
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9. The most useful full-length study of Ransom is Calvin S. Morris, Reverdy C. Ransom: Black Advocate of the Social Gospel (Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1990).
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Reverdy Ransom: Black Advocate of the Social Gospel. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1990.
Charles Street AME Church History
www.csame.org, 13 Mar 2001 [cached]
W. J. Thomas, Sr., and Jr. [father and son], Rev. Reverdy C. Ransom [elected 48th Bishop of the AME Church], Rev. Thomas Henderson, Rev. Oliver W. H. Childers, Rev. Sherman L. Greene [elected 51st Bishop of the AME Church], Rev. Walter C. Davis, Rev. Donald Luster and Rev. Mickarl D. Thomas, Sr.
Reverdy Ransom was a ...
www.socialwelfarehistory.com [cached]
Reverdy Ransom was a minister in Chicago and saw the development of the black urban poor. He created the Institutional Church and Social Settlement, a program for blacks similar to Jane Addams' Hull House. Ransom would later become bishop and editor of the A.M.E. Review.
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Reverdy Ransom was a minister in Chicago and saw the development of the black urban poor. He created the Institutional Church and Social Settlement, a program for blacks similar to Jane Addams' Hull House. Ransom would later become bishop and editor of the A.M.E. Review.
Inspirational, General
www.bargainbookswholesale.com, 3 Nov 2009 [cached]
Making the Gospel Plain: Writings of Bishop Reverdy C. Ransom
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by Reverdy C. Ransom
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