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Wrong Reverdy Ransom?

Reverdy C. Ransom

Pastor

Charles Street AME Church

HQ Phone:  (617) 442-7770

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Charles Street AME Church

551 Warren Street

Boston, Massachusetts,02121

United States

Find other employees at this company (38)

Background Information

Employment History

Bishop

African Methodist Episcopal Church


Affiliations

Niagara Movement

Founder


W. E. B. Du Bois

Founder


Web References(13 Total References)


Harpers Ferry - Storer College and the Niagara Movement / African American Heritage / Home - The Journey Through Hallowed Ground

www.hallowedground.org [cached]

The Niagarites listened to Henrietta Leary Evans whose brother and nephew fought along side Brown at Harpers Ferry, then Lewis Douglass, son of Frederick Douglass, and finally Reverdy C. Ransom, pastor of the Charles Street African Methodist Episcopal Church in Boston.


Vernon Johns 7 Black Social Gospel

www.vernonjohns.org [cached]

Reverdy Ransom
Ransom (Anderson 1982:21) was a black man with fair skin, reddish hair, and a face that was often as stern as a schoolmaster's. Ransom was both a minister and one of the most radical black activists of his time. He was born in Ohio during the Civil War. Ransom (Luker 1991:173-174) studied at Oberlin and heard the social gospel from the likes of Joseph Cook, John B. Gough, and Thomas De Witt Talmadge. In 1899, when news arrived of a recent lynching in the South, Ransom (Anderson 1982:22) delivered an aggressive sermon at the St. John's A.M.E. Church in Cleveland. He advised blacks to become skilled in the handling of dynamite and use it when attacked, for the protection of their homes and lives. It is hardly surprising that in 1905 Ransom was one of the progressives who joined W. E. B. Du Bois in forming the Niagara Movement, the nucleus of the NAACP, which was founded four years latter. In 1924 he became a bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, which was once regarded as the most racially militant of all black religious organizations in America. In the pulpit and on secular platforms, Ransom displayed the militant traditions of his church as well as the extemporaneous power and fluency of nineteenth-century oratory.


ST. JAMES AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH

www.stjamescleveland.net [cached]

Two hundred persons were converted at this meeting, which was conducted by Pastor Reverdy C. Ransom.
Cleveland then had an African American population of about seven thousand. Sometime later, in March 1894, Pastor Ransom came out to the East End and organized those praying souls into the St. James A.M.E. Church. Pastor Ransom preached to this group each Sunday afternoon for about a year, and, at his request, Bishop B. W. Arnett appointed a regular pastor for them. For several years the church was pastored by young men from Payne Theological Seminary at Wilberforce, Ohio.


www.socialwelfarehistory.com

Reverdy Ransom was a minister in Chicago and saw the development of the black urban poor.
He created the Institutional Church and Social Settlement, a program for blacks similar to Jane Addams' Hull House. Ransom would later become bishop and editor of the A.M.E. Review. Reverdy Ransom was a minister in Chicago and saw the development of the black urban poor. He created the Institutional Church and Social Settlement, a program for blacks similar to Jane Addams' Hull House. Ransom would later become bishop and editor of the A.M.E. Review.


www.prx.org

Gary Dorrien: Defying White Supremacism: Reverdy C. Ransom And The Black Social Gospel\n (01:19:17)
\n Dorrien talks about the activist Reverdy C. Ransom. As well as the discussion about Ransom, Dorrien also talks about ...\n


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