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Wrong Renee Hulshof?

Renee Hulshof

President

University of Missouri System

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

University of Missouri System

Background Information

Employment History

University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism


Affiliations

Women for Hulshof

Founder


House

Minority Member


Education

law degree

University of Mississippi


Web References(10 Total References)


www.columbiatribune.com

Hulshof's wife, Renee Hulshof, told a reporter recently she and her husband have been homebodies since the election and that they don't like people telling them how 'sorry they are.' The Hulshofs are moving on, focusing on a new routine, their family farm in southeast Missouri and their two daughters, Casey and Hanna.
Renee Hulshof said her husband, a lawyer, is going to look for work in the private sector, perhaps related to policy. Hulshof, 50, has been a congressman for a dozen years and probably could have held the seat as long as he wished. But he clearly has been restless the past few years, attempting to become president of the University of Missouri System in 2007 and stepping into the governor's race a year later after incumbent Gov. David Webber, a University of Missouri political scientist, said Hulshof's congressional career could best be remembered for the event in which Hulshof stood up against House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, R-Texas, in 2004. Hulshof, then a member of the House Ethics Committee, led an inquiry into an allegation that a member exchanged his vote in return for a favor. Hulshof's committee later reported that DeLay was responsible for the 'quid pro quo,' a disclosure that made Hulshof an enemy of DeLay's friends and cost Hulshof a position on the committee. Hulshof's committee later reported that DeLay was responsible for the 'quid pro quo,' a disclosure that made Hulshof an enemy of DeLay's friends and cost Hulshof a position on the committee. Hulshof consistently supported conservative issues while in Congress, including tax cuts, smaller government, anti-abortion legislation and gun ownership rights. He endorsed President George W. Bush's policies and voted for the 2002 Iraq war resolution. Rick Hocks, a musician and English professor, got to know Hulshof through their involvement in the choir at the Catholic St. Thomas More Newman Center in Columbia, where Hulshof played drums and Hocks was a guitarist. Hocks said Hulshof was 'a terrific guy, a great family man, very likable, intelligent and funny. In 2004, Hulshof served as Bush's re-election campaign chairman in Missouri. Bush helped raise $1.5 million for Hulshof's campaign for governor. Hulshof's political career began in the early 1990s as he made a name for himself by being a tough and aggressive special prosecutor. Years later, some criminal cases he brought against individuals are still under appeal or re-examination. He ran for Congress after failing to win appointment as Boone County prosecuting attorney. When he defeated incumbent Democrat Rep. Harold Volkmer in 1996, Hulshof was Columbia's first hometown congressman since Republican Max Schwabe was defeated in 1948.


ronrichard.com [cached]

· Renee Hulshof, B.J., University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism, Co-host of KFRU's "The Morning Meeting";


ronrichard.com [cached]

· Renee Hulshof, B.J., University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism, Co-host of KFRU’s “The Morning Meeting�;


ronrichard.com

· Renee Hulshof, B.J., University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism, Co-host of KFRU's "The Morning Meeting";
· Renee Hulshof, B.J., University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism, Co-host of KFRU's "The Morning Meeting";


www.kenny08.com [cached]

"Twenty-eight percent of the Republican primary vote will come from this area." Renee Hulshof formed the "Women for Hulshof" organization.The Joplin area gathering was the fourth, and the largest so far, she said. http://www.Kenny08.com/news/read.aspx?id=46Fri, 20 Jun 2008 00:00:00 GMT


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