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This profile was last updated on 12/2/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. Reina Maruyama

Wrong Dr. Reina Maruyama?

Assistant Professor , Department ...

Yale University
155 Whitney Ave
New Haven, Connecticut 06511
United States

Company Description: Yale University comprises three major academic components: Yale College (the undergraduate program), the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and the professional...   more
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

Education

  • Ph.D. , Physics
    University of Washington
8 Total References
Web References
Gordon Research Conferences - 2009 Program (Nuclear Physics)
www.grc.org, 2 July 2009 [cached]
Reina Maruyama (University of Wisconsin, Madison) "Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay"
Reina Maruyama, ...
www.aps.org, 16 Oct 2013 [cached]
Reina Maruyama, University of Wisconsin-Madison
...
Reina Maruyama is an Assistant Professor of Physics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research in nuclear and particle astrophysics focuses on the study of rare events including the search for neutrinoless double beta decay, dark matter, and supernovae. She is the spokesperson for the DM-Ice dark matter experiment at the South Pole, the US physics coordinator for the Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE), and she has been involved in the installation, operation, and the search for supernovae with the IceCube Detector. Dr. Maruyama earned her B.S. in Applied Physics at Columbia University and her M.S. and Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Washington. She was a University of California Chancellor’s postdoctoral fellow at Berkeley and a postdoctoral researcher at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory where she studied the fundamental forces of nature using laser-trapped atoms with the late Stuart Freedman. Dr. Maruyama came to Madison in 2006 as a scientist and joined the faculty in 2011. In 2012, she was awarded an NSF CAREER Award for the development of a direct detection dark matter experiment at the South Pole
Dr. Maruyama has been noted for her outstanding mentorship within the University of Wisconsin’s Physics Department and Wisconsin Icecube Particle Astrophysics Center (WIPAC). Her presence at WIPAC has created an invaluable and supportive environment for younger physicists. Maruyama has provided this mentoring and support all while launching and serving as a spokesperson for a new experiment, DM-Iceâ€"a novel dark matter project that is the only direct detection experiment operating in the southern hemisphere.
To prep for a supernova, Reina ...
whyfiles.org, 4 Feb 2012 [cached]
To prep for a supernova, Reina Maruyama, an assistant professor of physics at University of Wisconsin-Madison, is working to ensure that IceCube can handle this once-in-a-lifetime chance to get good data on a stellar explosion.
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If something like the 1987 supernova exploded nearby in our galaxy, Maruyama says, "there would be so many neutrinos, the whole ice would glow.
...
Since dark matter affects gravity, Maruyama says it must gather in the sun and the galaxies.
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Reina Maruyama (second from right) and colleagues with a prototype dark matter detector that's now two-plus kilometers deep in the Antarctic ice.
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The prototypes are working well enough to justify a larger, more expensive detector, Maruyama says.
If and when the experiment is replicated in Antarctic Ice, Maruyama says, "A positive result would be interesting, and a negative result would be interesting.
...
Tags: Antarctic Antarctica, astrophysics, Francis Halzen, IceCube Ice Cube, neutrino, Reina Maruyama, solar radiation, standard model of physics, theoretical physics, University of Wisconsin Madison UW-Madison
The Why Files
whyfiles.org, 2 Feb 2012 [cached]
To prep for a supernova, Reina Maruyama, an assistant professor of physics at University of Wisconsin-Madison, is working to ensure that IceCube can handle this once-in-a-lifetime chance to get good data on a stellar explosion.
...
If something like the 1987 supernova exploded nearby in our galaxy, Maruyama says, "there would be so many neutrinos, the whole ice would glow.
...
Since dark matter affects gravity, Maruyama says it must gather in the sun and the galaxies.
...
Reina Maruyama (second from right) and colleagues with a prototype dark matter detector that's now two-plus kilometers deep in the Antarctic ice.
...
The prototypes are working well enough to justify a larger, more expensive detector, Maruyama says.
If and when the experiment is replicated in Antarctic Ice, Maruyama says, "A positive result would be interesting, and a negative result would be interesting.
Professor Reina Maruyama is ...
www.yalealumnimagazine.com, 15 May 2014 [cached]
Professor Reina Maruyama is one of the Yale faculty on the hunt. "There's five times the dark matter as there is ordinary matter" in all the stars put together, she says. "And we really have no idea what that is right now."
To understand something so mysterious, Maruyama starts with something slightly less so-neutrinos, the subatomic particles passing by the billions every second through every inch of everything on Earth. "The history of the universe is imprinted in dark matter and neutrinos," she says.
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