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Wrong Reagan Burkholder?

Reagan Burkholder

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Employment History

Principal

Summit Collaborative


Consultant

Summit Collaborative


Municipal Performance Consultant

Summit Collaborative


Consultant

New Jersey State League of Municipalities


Web References(8 Total References)


www.northjersey.com

Reagan Burkholder, a principal at Summit Collaborative Advisors LLC and the former administrator of the City of Summit in Union County, said that if Woodbridge had splintered into 10 different communities, the 2009 tax levy for the 10 towns could have been $81 million, instead of $60 million, and the per capita cost per resident would have been $828, instead of $613.
He compared the 2009 budgets and tax levies of Carlstadt, East Rutherford, Little Ferry, Lyndhurst, Moonachie, North Arlington, Rutherford, Wallington and Wood-Ridge to that of Woodridge Township. Burkholder said that the nine Bergen County towns would have had an aggregate budget of $158.5 million, with a $104.6 million levy, compared with Woodbridge Township's $110 million budget and $60 million tax levy in 2009. Reagan Burkholder, a principal at Summit Collaborative Advisors LLC and the former administrator of the City of Summit in Union County, said that if Woodbridge had splintered into 10 different communities, the 2009 tax levy for the 10 towns could have been $81 million, instead of $60 million, and the per capita cost per resident would have been $828, instead of $613. He compared the 2009 budgets and tax levies of Carlstadt, East Rutherford, Little Ferry, Lyndhurst, Moonachie, North Arlington, Rutherford, Wallington and Wood-Ridge to that of Woodridge Township. Burkholder said that the nine Bergen County towns would have had an aggregate budget of $158.5 million, with a $104.6 million levy, compared with Woodbridge Township's $110 million budget and $60 million tax levy in 2009.


www.njslom.org

Reagan Burkholder, Consultant, Summit Collaborative Advisors, LLCReagan Burkholder, Consultant, Summit Collaborative Advisors, LLC. He is a consultant to New Jersey municipalities.Previously, he served 32 years in local-government management, retiring as city administrator in Summit.He has spoken at many state and national conferences, and received management awards from the American Society for Public Administration and the NJ Municipal Management Association.He holds degrees from the University of Notre Dame and the University of Connecticut.


avenel.newjersey.localjobboard.com [cached]

Reagan Burkholder, a municipal performance consultant with Summit Collaborative, LLC, ...


www.bergenleadsbuzz.com [cached]

Panelists at the forum included Woodbridge Mayor John E. McCormac; Woodbridge Schools Superintendent Dr. John Crowe; Reagan Burkholder of Summit Collaborative Advisors, LLC; CTC-NJ Research Director Andrew Bruck, Esq.; and former Bergen County Executive/LEADS Seminar Director William "Pat" Schuber.
Mr. Burkholder explained that, with several towns sharing services, it is possible for everyone's taxes to go down.


www.northjersey.com

Reagan Burkholder, a consultant with Union County-based Summit Collaborative and a former city administrator in New Jersey, said there are areas where towns can save money by coordinating their efforts and eliminating redundancies."There's absolutely no question in my mind that there are savings that ought to take place," said Burkholder, who participated in the 2006 legislative effort to study the issue. But Burkholder said he's also found the issue can be overplayed to make it seem like there are incredible savings that may not actually exist. "I don't think there are any magic bullets out there," he said. One of the studies he cites is of a proposed merger of two municipal police departments of towns of approximately the same size with nearly identical budgets.A merger would result in savings of about 1 percent off the local property tax bills after county and school taxes were assessed. Now Burkholder is studying a merger of fire departments in nine towns that employ both paid and volunteer firefighters.The communities with paid firefighters spend between $124 and $246 per capita on fire services; the towns with volunteers spend between $17 and $26 per capita, he said. Merging the volunteer departments with paid departments may save money if equipment is sold off, but Burkholder wouldn't recommend it in the long run for the towns with volunteers. "Then they've got a bunch of firefighters making $80,000," he said. Burkholder, meanwhile, said he believes the bigger issue is the state's overreliance on property taxes as a primary source of revenue. "The municipalities have no place to turn to other than the property tax," he said.Reagan Burkholder, a consultant with Union County-based Summit Collaborative and a former city administrator in New Jersey, said there are areas where towns can save money by coordinating their efforts and eliminating redundancies."There's absolutely no question in my mind that there are savings that ought to take place," said Burkholder, who participated in the 2006 legislative effort to study the issue.But Burkholder said he's also found the issue can be overplayed to make it seem like there are incredible savings that may not actually exist."I don't think there are any magic bullets out there," he said.One of the studies he cites is of a proposed merger of two municipal police departments of towns of approximately the same size with nearly identical budgets.A merger would result in savings of about 1 percent off the local property tax bills after county and school taxes were assessed.Now Burkholder is studying a merger of fire departments in nine towns that employ both paid and volunteer firefighters.The communities with paid firefighters spend between $124 and $246 per capita on fire services; the towns with volunteers spend between $17 and $26 per capita, he said.Merging the volunteer departments with paid departments may save money if equipment is sold off, but Burkholder wouldn't recommend it in the long run for the towns with volunteers."Then they've got a bunch of firefighters making $80,000," he said.


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