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Wrong Ray Perez?

Ray S. Perez

Program Officer

US Navy

HQ Phone:  (703) 695-8400

Direct Phone: (703) ***-****direct phone

Email: r***@***.mil

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

US Navy

2000 Navy Pentagon

Washington, D.C., District of Columbia,20350

United States

Company Description

The mission of the Navy is to maintain, train and equip combat-ready Naval forces capable of winning wars, deterring aggression and maintaining freedom of the seas....more

Background Information

Employment History

Program Manager At the Office of Cognitive Science of Learning Program

Naval Research


Program Officer

Office of Naval Research


Web References(35 Total References)


Playing video games may actually make you a better soldier - Business Insider

feedproxy.google.com [cached]

"We have somewhat solid data to support the notion that playing video games in fact actually improves your cognitive processes and your visual processes," said Dr. Ray Perez, program manager at the Office of Naval Research's Cognitive Science of Learning Program, in an interview with Task & Purpose.
"Video game players are far superior to non-video game players in the ability to process things like field of vision, being able to hold digital objects in your memory. They can process information faster," he added. And that's where virtual and augmented reality come into play. Perez said that his team is working on simulations of virtual military environments. Soon he hopes to better understanding of exactly how video games in virtual realities affect the brain and how they increase soldier's abilities Noting that games can help increase capacity for speed and efficiency, the next question for ONR, according to Perez, was, can we train that capacity and that skill? Usually in the event that a person can do something faster, he or she often has the trade-off in quality, meaning that faster activities result in more errors - a phenomenon called "speed-accuracy trade-off." However, video game players typically are not susceptible to this occurrence. "They increase their speed but they don't commit more errors," Perez said. "One of the things we think that simulators are very good at is because they're computer based you can sit before a computer screen and play through multiple scenarios," Perez added. If it's designed properly the trainees really feel as if they are in combat, in a real-life situation," Perez said. Still, there are downsides. "Unfortunately, we have not been able for the most part to demonstrate the effectiveness of virtual reality. And furthermore, we haven't figured out the magic sauce," Perez said. He is not distracted by irrelevant cues or irrelevant information," Perez said. "Not so with the novices. He's overloading his cognitive processes. So he's trying to take it all in." According to Perez, training needs to be a process of building upon small fundamentals, even in the world of virtual reality. And striking a balance between rich environments and one that can help trainees learn is what ONR hopes to accomplish over the next several years. "Virtual reality is really cool," Perez said.


divinelabs.com

Dr. Ray Perez, a program officer in ONR's Warfighter Performance Department, states that "leg injuries are particularly difficult to treat since different points of entry cause different levels of blood loss.


US Navy: Gamers Are Smarter Than "Normal People" News

www.totalvideogames.com [cached]

These comments were made by Ray Perez, a Program Officer at the Office of Naval Research's Warfighter Performance Department.
We might point out that we came to that conclusion a long time before he did, but whatever. "You walk into a cave and you're bombarded by this totally different, artificial world where there may be intelligent avatars that you interact with to perform a mission," Perez said. "These avatars will act as teammates, so you, as an individual, will have to interact with these avatars as a unit." "I think we're at the beginning of a new science of learning," he said, "that will be the integration of neuroscience with developmental psychology, with cognitive science, and with artificial intelligence."


www.navysbir.com

2nd TPOC: Ray Perez
Phone: (703)696-4986 Email: ray.perez@navy.mil


www.thefalcononline.com

Ray Perez, a program officer at the ONR's warfighter performance department, said, "We have discovered that video game players perform 10 to 20 percent higher in terms of perceptual and cognitive ability than normal people that are non-game players.


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