No Photo Available

Last Update

2014-10-18T00:00:00.000Z

This profile was last updated on .

Is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Ray Kappe?

Mr. Ray Kappe

Get ZoomInfo Grow

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Employment History

LACI

Courtesy Museum

Professor and Founding Chairman of the Department of Architecture

Cal Poly State University

Architects

KieranTimberlake Associates LLP

Design Teacher

University of Southern California

Multilevel Family Home By Los Angeles Architect

Tumblr

Architect

South Bay Digs

Education

American Institute of Architects

Architect

Volume 5

Draftsman On Eichler Homes

Anshen + Allen

Architect, Architect

Malibu Magazine

Architect

Google Inc

Architect

Jan Eric Horn

Architect

Mia Lehrer + Associates

Contributor

Dwell LLC

Architect

System Interface Consultants Inc

Affiliations

ADVISORY BOARD Member
A+D Museum

Founder
Southern California Institute of Architecture

Architect
LivingHomes , LLC

President
Kappe+Du Architects LLP

Information Advisory Board
Home Museum

Founder
LivingHome

Education

University of California , Berkeley

University of California at Berkeley

architecture

Berkeley

California Modern Master

Web References (200 Total References)


Visionary and founder of SCI-Arc Ray Kappe | Powerful Insights From Influential Architects : Architect Success

www.architectsuccess.com [cached]

Ray Kappe is unusually humble considering the vast contributions he's made to architecture. During our interview, he denied being an academic, meanwhile he founded the now-thriving architecture programs at Cal Poly Pomona and SCI-Arc, the latter of which he started with funds out of his own pocket. He shrugs when I call him successful, and says he just did what seemed logical. This pioneer has undoubtedly impacted several generations of architects and aficionados through his work and his educational pursuits.

Kappe's focus on architecture began during his junior year of high school after reading a book about the trade. His strengths in art, math, and science seemed a perfect combination, however before attending college, he was drafted into the army and spent several years as a surveying instructor for the US Army Corp of Engineers. After World War II, Kappe spent brief stints at both UCLA and USC before settling in at UC Berkeley's architecture program.
During his final year at Berkeley, Kappe worked as a draftsman for Anshen+Allen in San Francisco. He recalls being with a small design-oriented firm as an excellent experience. He worked primarily on Joseph Eichler homes-exploring small, affordable, well-designed, modern structures-as well as Standard Oil stations. "This gave me experience in simple post and beam wood detailing and metalprefab systems," he says. "I thoroughly enjoyed my time with this firm."
"For those of us working during the 1950s, our interest was developing architecture to create a better California lifestyle, and Eichler was wholeheartedly selling just that," Kappe says.
...
Kappe grew up living in apartment buildings and recalls that most people had older houses back then.
...
Kappe and his wife, Shelly, then returned to Los Angeles, where he worked for Pereira & Luckman to gain experience with a large firm. That experience was short-lived because he found the learning process was too slow. He went to work with Carl Maston for the next two years, obtained his architectural license, and opened his own practice in 1953. Kappe gained a great deal of knowledge about architecture and business working for Maston.
...
Kappe also grew up around business. His parents were in the mercantile industry, and starting at age twelve, he would help his father with the accounting. "I saw how he marked up merchandise and understood how to make a profit," he recalls. "That held me in pretty good stead. I understood that you have to spend less than you take in, which is a simple principle of economics."
Kappe enjoys running his company. He says, "I like the business part. It was never a big deal to me." I inquired if he had a chief financial officer, to which he explains, "I was CFO, CEO, COO-all of it.
...
Early on in his career, Kappe knew he wanted to have his own firm. "I was never a company guy," he says matter-of-factly. He also knew he wanted a small office, citing that he didn't like that the design staff was separated out from the people doing construction documents in the larger firms. "The bosses wander through the office once a week," he says.
...
Kappe's first project was for himself. His father put up $6,000 for the land, and he designed, built, and rented out an apartment complex. He remembers meeting people who stopped by to see it, and before long, four or five jobs sprang from it. Arts & Architecture published this complex project, along with the first house Kappe built. Later, he won awards on both buildings, which helped garner much attention. During his early career, he also designed projects for several young engineers in the aerospace industry, with one project leading to the next. Kappe says to this day, press and word-of- mouth are his main avenues for landing work. He's never formally marketed himself, yet he's always had enough work. He says, "I didn't feel like I needed to beat the world or grow the biggest firm."
After ten years in practice, Kappe, along with Herb Kahn and Rex Lotery, became involved with AIA's Urban Design Committee.
...
Kappe also says, "Postmodernism was becoming prevalent. We weren't interested in making the compromise to design that type of work. And so over a lunch, we decided we weren't having fun anymore and amicably dissolved our partnership. We split the work and went our separate ways. He's been working out of his home office ever since.
During this same time, Kappe was asked to become chairman of the architectural department at Cal Poly Pomona-a golden opportunity to create the program and staff it from scratch. Pulling from experience he had teaching at USC, Kappe built a successful program that promotes a spirit of experimentation.
After differences with the dean at Cal Poly, he decided to leave and start his own school, SCI-Arc. Fifty students and six faculty members from Cal Poly followed him to get started. Another twenty-five students joined from around the country for their first academic year. He found a raw warehouse and fronted the money for the first month of rent to get the school up and running. Tuition carried them from there, and much like his practice, Kappe insisted they stay in the black instead of relying on grants. He says most architectural students learn in an intuitive versus rational or scientific way. He believes quality architecture requires a balance of both rational and intuitive thinking.
Kappe suggests everyone work for a firm for at least a few years. "If you're entrepreneurial, then either look for the smaller firm or the big firm with a unique opportunity for you to take a client," he says.
...
Kappe has learned many lessons over the years. He suggests architects insist on a retainer to start a project. He used to ask for just a small amount, but says, "There came a time when clients figured out they could get away with stiffing us on the last $10,000, so I started building in an advance to any job.
...
Kappe has been married to Shelly for more than fifty years and you can still see the chemistry between them. She straightens his shirt and makes him giggle for the photo shoot. "We have always been very close and mutually supportive," he says. "When our three children were growing up, I never worked nights or weekends and was always available for trips and family activities. After our children went off to college, we continued working together developing SCI-Arc into an internationally recognized school. And now, Kappe says he's just enjoying himself.


1967 Ray & Shelly Kappe House ...

jillderay.tumblr.com [cached]

1967 Ray & Shelly Kappe House | Architect: Ray Kappe | Brooktree Road, Pacific Palisades, CA

...
Unsung modern master Ray Kappe taught at USC and Cal Poly Pomona before founding the Southern California Institute of Architecture in 1972.
...
Ray Kappe, the warm but modern architect. He´s my role model right now


1967 Ray & Shelly Kappe House ...

jillderay.tumblr.com [cached]

1967 Ray & Shelly Kappe House | Architect: Ray Kappe | Brooktree Road, Pacific Palisades, CA

...
Unsung modern master Ray Kappe taught at USC and Cal Poly Pomona before founding the Southern California Institute of Architecture in 1972.
...
Ray Kappe, the warm but modern architect. He´s my role model right now


1967 Ray & Shelly Kappe House ...

jillderay.tumblr.com [cached]

1967 Ray & Shelly Kappe House | Architect: Ray Kappe | Brooktree Road, Pacific Palisades, CA

...
Unsung modern master Ray Kappe taught at USC and Cal Poly Pomona before founding the Southern California Institute of Architecture in 1972.


LivingHomes - About Ray Kappe

www.livinghomes.net [cached]

Ray Kappe | Ray Kappe, FAIA | About Ray Kappe

...
Ray Kappe | Ray Kappe, FAIA | About Ray Kappe
...
Ray Kappe
...
Ray Kappe: Warm Modernist
Ray Kappe, FAIA, is renowned for his residential architecture which has been characterized as 'the apotheosis of the California House.' His designs evince a mastery of warm, modern spaces, clearly expressed construction systems, and environmental sensitivity . "I've always sought out the edges, the views, and a feeling of expansiveness," Kappe said.
During his first ten years of practice, he completed fifty custom post-and-beam houses. Exploring modular systems, prefabrication, passive energy and active solar systems, Kappe has completed commercial, low-cost housing, condominium, hotel and college buildings. He has also been involved in urban design and planning, as well as social and community advocacy. Responding to a question about the ten most important principles that helped make him a successful architect, planner, and educator, Kappe included the following two: "Always be willing to explore, experiment and invent. Do not accept the status quo;" and "Maintain good moral and social values."
In 1972, after three -and-a-half successful years as professor and Founding Chairman of the Department of Architecture at California Polytechnic State University, Pomona, Kappe resigned. With a group of faculty members and students, he started the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc). The SCI-Arc model of education encourages learning through creative discourse and supports diversity of opinion within the framework of a common vision. Today the school is 34 years old, with 3,000 graduates working and teaching all over the world. It is considered one of the top architecture schools in the country.
Kappe has received many awards including the Richard Neutra International Medal for Design Excellence, the California Council/AIA Bernard Maybeck Award for Design, and the Topaz Medal, the highest award in architectural education . His own residence was designated a Cultural Heritage Monument by the City of Los Angeles in 1996.
...
Ray continues to design from his strengths, even as his work incorporates new technology. "I'm no different in my mind than when I first started," he says. "I'm doing the kinds of things now I would have done 50 years ago.
...
Book (Themes and Variations: Ray Kappe)
...
Ray Kappe

Similar Profiles

Other People with this Name

Other people with the name Kappe

Guido Kappe
Jacobs Engineering Group Inc.

Kai Kappe
Kiefel GmbH

Megan Kappe
Rosary Academy

Jack Kappe
FOCUS REAL ESTATE LP

Paul Kappe
Bilfinger Berger SE

City Directory Icon

Browse ZoomInfo's Business Contact Directory by City

People Directory Icon

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

Company Directory Icon

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory