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2015-06-23T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Randy Deitz?

Randy Deitz

Attorney-Adviser

Environmental Protection Agency

Direct Phone: (202) ***-****       

Email: d***@***.gov

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Environmental Protection Agency

1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.

Washington D.C, District of Columbia 20460

United States

Company Description

The Green Power Partnership is a voluntary programme that encourages organisations to buy green power as a way to reduce the environmental impacts associated with electricity use. The Partnership currently has close to 1,300 Partner organisations voluntar ... more

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Background Information

Employment History

Attorney Adviser In the Program

The Superfund

Web References (16 Total References)


Superfund In the News

www.besafenet.com [cached]

Randy Deitz, an attorney adviser in the EPA's Office of Solid Waste Management and Emergency Response, said federal officials took steps when cleaning up the Gulf Coast sites to protect them from future storm damage.But he added, "In the case of a catastrophe, sometimes all the engineering in the world is not going to prevent some erosion."


ENVIRONMENTAL NEWS 2005

www.otrain.com [cached]

Randy Deitz, an attorney adviser in the EPA's Office of Solid Waste Management and Emergency Response, said federal officials took steps when cleaning up the Gulf Coast sites to protect them from future storm damage.


Flooded Toxic Waste Sites Are Potential Health Threat

www.washingtonpost.com [cached]

Randy Deitz, an attorney adviser in the EPA's Office of Solid Waste Management and Emergency Response, said federal officials took steps when cleaning up the Gulf Coast sites to protect them from future storm damage.But he added, "In the case of a catastrophe, sometimes all the engineering in the world is not going to prevent some erosion."


New York Struggles With Superfund Problems

www.greatlakesdirectory.org [cached]

"We would love to be able to clean up more sites," said Randy Deitz, an attorney and EPA adviser."There has been no decision not to clean sites up.Nothing could be further from the truth."

Deitz said the slowdown has nothing to do with the depletion of the Superfund Trust Fund, which has dwindled from $3 billion in 1995 to an estimated $28 million in 2003.
About 70 percent of cleanups are paid for directly by the companies that made the mess.And while the trust fund is supposed to pay for the rest, Deitz said Congress has set aside enough money to pay for them even while the trust fund has been dwindling.
The chemical industry funded the trust fund through a special tax until 1995, when it expired.Clinton never could persuade Congress to reauthorize the tax, and Bush hasn't even tried.
Democrats and environmentalists see a big connection between that fact and the lagging pace of the cleanups.
"They just reject the polluter-pays principle," said Rep.


Buffalo News - Lagging Superfund signals trouble

www.buffalonews.com [cached]

"We would love to be able to clean up more sites," said Randy Deitz, an attorney and EPA adviser."There has been no decision not to clean sites up.Nothing could be further from the truth."

Deitz said the slowdown has nothing to do with the depletion of the Superfund Trust Fund, which has dwindled from $3 billion in 1995 to an estimated $28 million in 2003.
About 70 percent of cleanups are paid for directly by the companies that made the mess.And while the trust fund is supposed to pay for the rest, Deitz said Congress has set aside enough money to pay for them even while the trust fund has been dwindling.
The chemical industry funded the trust fund through a special tax until 1995, when it expired.Clinton never could persuade Congress to reauthorize the tax, and Bush hasn't even tried.
Democrats and environmentalists see a big connection between that fact and the lagging pace of the cleanups.
"They just reject the polluter-pays principle," said Rep.
...
The Bush administration has essentially maintained silence on the tax issue, but Deitz said the administration may think about reinstituting the polluter tax next year, now that the Superfund has nearly run dry.In addition, the EPA is studying ways to make the pace of cleanups more steady.
"Certainly it's an issue that's not going to go away," Deitz said.
e-mail: http://www.buffalonews.com/email/email_form.asp?author_dept_id=43

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