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Wrong Ran Aaronsohn?

Ran Aaronsohn

Senior Lecturer In Geography

Hebrew University

HQ Phone:  (212) 607-8500

Email: m***@***.il

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Hebrew University

One Battery Park Plaza 25Th Floor

New York City, New York,10004

United States

Company Description

Ranked among the top academic and research institutions worldwide, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem is Israel's leading university and premier research institution. Serving 23,000 students from 70 countries, the Hebrew University produces a third of Israel's...more

Web References(5 Total References)


Freedom Fighters of Nili, a Story About the Nili Spies' Steps Towards Freedom

www.freedomfightersofnili.com [cached]

Dr. Ran Aaronsohn
Main Advisor Dr. Ran Aaronsohn is a senior lecturer in Geography at Hebrew University in Jerusalem and is a descendent of the Aaronsohn family. He has written several books and numerous journal articles about early Zionism. Dr. Aaronsohn authored Rothschild and Early Jewish Colonization in Palestine (Magnes Press & Rowman & Littlefield) Jerusalem & New York, 2001, among many other publications.


Wix.com NILI created by Leorachai based on Marketing Solutions

www.freedomfightersofnili.com [cached]

Ran Aaronsohn is a senior lecturer in Geography at Hebrew University in Jerusalem and is a descendent of the Aaronsohn family.
He has written several books and numerous journal articles about early Zionism. Dr. Aaronsohn authored Rothschild and Early Jewish Colonization in Palestine (Magnes Press & Rowman & Littlefield) Jerusalem & New York, 2001, among many other publications.


www.rowmanlittlefield.com

By Ran Aaronsohn
Ran Aaronsohn provides fresh insight into the role played by Baron Edmond de Rothschild through his many and diverse agents ( the administration ) in the Jewish settlement movement and places the endeavor in global perspective by comparing it to the phenomenon of colonization throughout the world. Ran Aaronsohn is senior lecturer in geography at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is the author of numerous publications in historical geography, concentrating on the reshaping of contemporary Palestine.


www.haaretz.com

A century after the journey to the Dead Sea, Aaronsohn's travels in the land of Israel are at the center of the research of Dr. Ran Aaronsohn of the Hebrew University.Aaronsohn, 58, is kin to Aaron Aaronsohn: His grandfather, Shmuel, was Aaronsohn's brother. "This really was an expedition into the unknown," says Ran Aaronsohn."The Dead Sea was a marginal, uninhabited area, a land with no government and no law.They suffered from storms, heat, plagues of mosquitoes and injuries." In his capacity as the owner of the Dead Sea and its environs, the sultan required of Aaronsohn - who was an Ottoman subject - that he investigate the quarries and the region's possibilities for industrial and agricultural development. "The aim was the development of the Ottoman Empire, or advancing the sultan's own economic interests," explains Aaronsohn."Aaronsohn was an independent entrepreneur, who for economic ends took all kinds of missions upon himself, on the one hand for the Zionists and on the other for the Ottoman Turks."It is very likely that under the table Aaronsohn was asked by the Zionist institutions to examine things of which the Ottomans were not aware," says Aaronsohn."He tried to conceal the Zionist aims and keep them secret both from the Ottoman authorities and from representatives of European companies who were touring the region.Aaronsohn had two hats: He was both a Zionist and a researcher on the sultan's behalf.But the one who foot the bill was the sultan." According to Aaronsohn, his great-uncle "was very different from later Zionists because he was baladi (Arabic for local), and he considered himself a son of the country, with close ties to the authorities.Unlike the pioneers of the Second Aliyah (the wave of Jewish immigrants to Palestine between 1904 and 1914, mostly from Russia and Poland), he did not set himself apart from the Arabs but rather employed many Arabs and felt very comfortable with them." Aaronsohn's journals, which have been published by the Aaronsohn Foundation, are comprised mostly of descriptions of bushes and grasses, which he identified on the journey.In between, however, there is a scattering of juicy observations about his companions on the journey.Among other things, these document his complex relationship with the doctor, Muharram Effendi, who was responsible for writing the reports to the Sultan.Usually, he describes scornfully the doctor's qualms about the journey."Early in the morning Muharram Effendi came to tell me that because of a shortage of barley, we would have to give up the trip to the south.We scolded him, as he deserved," wrote Aaronsohn on March 18, and later: "Muharram Effendi is truly in the grip of fear.Muharram Effendi spoke the verse, 'Open Sesame,'" writes Aaronsohn. It appears that the expedition was a success.The problems, however, came from a different direction: Three months later, the revolt of the Young Turks broke out.Sultan Abdul Hamid had to institute reforms and within half a year he was deposed. For Aaronsohn and Blankenhorn, however, this was a disaster: The sultan owed them money."The Young Turks shrugged off their obligations," explains Aaronsohn."They said: The sultan commissioned you - he should pay you himself.Aaronsohn spent three months in Istanbul to get the money." Had Aaronsohn's hostility toward the Ottoman regime, against which he spied during the period of World War I, already begun at that time?"This is a mystery that hasn't been solved," says Aaronsohn.


www.haaretz.com

A century after the journey to the Dead Sea, Aaronsohn's travels in the land of Israel are at the center of the research of Dr. Ran Aaronsohn of the Hebrew University.Aaronsohn, 58, is kin to Aaron Aaronsohn: His grandfather, Shmuel, was Aaronsohn's brother. "This really was an expedition into the unknown," says Ran Aaronsohn."The Dead Sea was a marginal, uninhabited area, a land with no government and no law.They suffered from storms, heat, plagues of mosquitoes and injuries." In his capacity as the owner of the Dead Sea and its environs, the sultan required of Aaronsohn - who was an Ottoman subject - that he investigate the quarries and the region's possibilities for industrial and agricultural development. "The aim was the development of the Ottoman Empire, or advancing the sultan's own economic interests," explains Aaronsohn."Aaronsohn was an independent entrepreneur, who for economic ends took all kinds of missions upon himself, on the one hand for the Zionists and on the other for the Ottoman Turks."It is very likely that under the table Aaronsohn was asked by the Zionist institutions to examine things of which the Ottomans were not aware," says Aaronsohn."He tried to conceal the Zionist aims and keep them secret both from the Ottoman authorities and from representatives of European companies who were touring the region.Aaronsohn had two hats: He was both a Zionist and a researcher on the sultan's behalf.But the one who foot the bill was the sultan." According to Aaronsohn, his great-uncle "was very different from later Zionists because he was baladi (Arabic for local), and he considered himself a son of the country, with close ties to the authorities.Unlike the pioneers of the Second Aliyah (the wave of Jewish immigrants to Palestine between 1904 and 1914, mostly from Russia and Poland), he did not set himself apart from the Arabs but rather employed many Arabs and felt very comfortable with them." Aaronsohn's journals, which have been published by the Aaronsohn Foundation, are comprised mostly of descriptions of bushes and grasses, which he identified on the journey.In between, however, there is a scattering of juicy observations about his companions on the journey.Among other things, these document his complex relationship with the doctor, Muharram Effendi, who was responsible for writing the reports to the Sultan. Usually, he describes scornfully the doctor's qualms about the journey."Early in the morning Muharram Effendi came to tell me that because of a shortage of barley, we would have to give up the trip to the south.We scolded him, as he deserved," wrote Aaronsohn on March 18, and later: "Muharram Effendi is truly in the grip of fear.Muharram Effendi spoke the verse, 'Open Sesame,'" writes Aaronsohn. It appears that the expedition was a success.The problems, however, came from a different direction: Three months later, the revolt of the Young Turks broke out.Sultan Abdul Hamid had to institute reforms and within half a year he was deposed. For Aaronsohn and Blankenhorn, however, this was a disaster: The sultan owed them money."The Young Turks shrugged off their obligations," explains Aaronsohn."They said: The sultan commissioned you - he should pay you himself.Aaronsohn spent three months in Istanbul to get the money." Had Aaronsohn's hostility toward the Ottoman regime, against which he spied during the period of World War I, already begun at that time?"This is a mystery that hasn't been solved," says Aaronsohn.


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