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2007-04-20T00:00:00.000Z

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Background Information

Employment History

President of the Main Pro-Independence Group
University of Puerto Rico

Researcher In Charge of the Documents
Hunter College

Researcher At the Center for Puerto Rican Studies
Hunter College

Education

bachelor's degree

Web References (9 Total References)


September23.org

www.september23.org [cached]

One of those subjects is Ramon Bosque-Perez, a sociologist and the researcher now leading the effort at the Hunter center to preserve the F.B.I. historical trove.

Mr. Bosque-Perez was one of the authors of a 1997 book on the Puerto Rican police dossiers, known as "carpetas." He said the first inkling that he was under investigation came in the late 1960's, when he was still in high school and politically active. Two plainclothes police officers visited his mother, he said, and advised her to keep him out of trouble.
When Mr. Bosque-Perez, who later became president of the main pro-independence group at the University of Puerto Rico, claimed his surveillance files, he learned that he had been tracked through the early 1980's. His files recorded his arrest for refusing to register for the draft and his participation in public events beginning in high school, he said.
But his much bulkier police dossier, running more than 2,000 pages, he said, included such minutiae as the license plates of the cars he drove and a partial guest list of a wedding he attended. "The extent of the invasion of privacy and of the threat to the basic right of citizens to express themselves politically was surprising," said Mr. Bosque-Perez, who said it took him 10 years to obtain his bachelor's degree because his political activities led to frequent suspensions by college administrators.


The Files in the Media

www.pr-secretfiles.net [cached]

One of those subjects is Ramon Bosque-Perez, a sociologist and the researcher now leading the effort at the Hunter center to preserve the F.B.I. historical trove.

Mr. Bosque-Perez was one of the authors of a 1997 book on the Puerto Rican police dossiers, known as "carpetas. He said the first inkling that he was under investigation came in the late 1960's, when he was still in high school and politically active. Two plainclothes police officers visited his mother, he said, and advised her to keep him out of trouble.
When Mr. Bosque-Perez, who later became president of the main pro-independence group at the University of Puerto Rico, claimed his surveillance files, he learned that he had been tracked through the early 1980's. His files recorded his arrest for refusing to register for the draft and his participation in public events beginning in high school, he said.
But his much bulkier police dossier, running more than 2,000 pages, he said, included such minutiae as the license plates of the cars he drove and a partial guest list of a wedding he attended.
"The extent of the invasion of privacy and of the threat to the basic right of citizens to express themselves politically was surprising," said Mr. Bosque-Perez, who said it took him 10 years to obtain his bachelor's degree because his political activities led to frequent suspensions by college administrators.


The Files in the Media

www.pr-secretfiles.net [cached]

"There are lessons here on how much energy and resources were spent on political persecution of dissident groups," Ramon Bosque-Perez told Newsday. He is a researcher in charge of the documents at Hunter.

The papers show that FBI agents and police have long spied on Puerto Ricans who advocated independence for the island, Bosque-Perez said.
...
The agency later collected nearly two million pages of documents about its surveillance activities and began handing the files over to Serrano, who then gave them to Bosque-Perez.


The Files in the Media

www.pr-secretfiles.net [cached]

"This is an historical record that is very important," said Ramon Bosque-Perez, a researcher who is organizing the documents. "There are lessons here on how much energy and resources were spent on political persecution of dissident groups."

The files have a personal meaning for Bosque-Perez because he, like many, suffered as a result of information that was passed along to various people by police agents. In Bosque-Perez's case, he was suspended from school and harassed in other ways after being surveilled by Puerto Rican police working with the FBI, he said.
...
Bosque-Perez said that, at the current rate, it will take decades for the FBI to hand over all the files.
...
FBI record-keeping on Puerto Ricans lasted through the 1990s, Bosque-Perez said.
As a college student back on the island in the 1970s and 80s, Bosque-Perez participated in campus demonstrations, including a massive student strike while he was a law student in 1981.
In 1997 Bosque-Perez filed a Freedom of Information request with the FBI. Two years later he received more than a hundred pages of reports about his activities on the island. -------------------------------------------------- [Illustration] Caption: Newsday Photo/Viorel Florescu- Ramon Bosque-Perez, researcher at the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College, is compiling the documents.


The Files in the Media

www.pr-secretfiles.com [cached]

One of those subjects is Ramon Bosque-Perez, a sociologist and the researcher now leading the effort at the Hunter center to preserve the F.B.I. historical trove.

Mr. Bosque-Perez was one of the authors of a 1997 book on the Puerto Rican police dossiers, known as "carpetas." He said the first inkling that he was under investigation came in the late 1960's, when he was still in high school and politically active. Two plainclothes police officers visited his mother, he said, and advised her to keep him out of trouble.
When Mr. Bosque-Perez, who later became president of the main pro-independence group at the University of Puerto Rico, claimed his surveillance files, he learned that he had been tracked through the early 1980's. His files recorded his arrest for refusing to register for the draft and his participation in public events beginning in high school, he said.
But his much bulkier police dossier, running more than 2,000 pages, he said, included such minutiae as the license plates of the cars he drove and a partial guest list of a wedding he attended.
"The extent of the invasion of privacy and of the threat to the basic right of citizens to express themselves politically was surprising," said Mr. Bosque-Perez, who said it took him 10 years to obtain his bachelor's degree because his political activities led to frequent suspensions by college administrators.

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