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2016-03-19T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Rafael Yuste?

Dr. Rafael Yuste M.

Professor

Columbia University

Direct Phone: (212) ***-****       

Columbia University

622 West 168Th Street PH 16 24

New York, New York 10032

United States

Company Description

Founded in 1922, Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health pursues an agenda of research, education, and service to address the critical and complex public health issues affecting New Yorkers, the nation and the world. The Mailman School is th ... more

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Background Information

Affiliations

Scientific Advisory Board Member
Allen Institute for Brain Science

Advisory Board
Paul Allen Brain Institute

Postdoctoral Fellow
OSTP and NIH

Education

M.D.

Universidad Autonoma

Ph.D.

Columbia University

Web References (195 Total References)


Rafael Yuste is Professor of ...

www.alleninstitute.org [cached]

Rafael Yuste is Professor of Biological Sciences and Neuroscience at Columbia University. He was born in Madrid, where he obtained his M.D. at the Universidad Autónoma. After a brief period in Sydney Brenner's laboratory in Cambridge, UK, he performed Ph.D. studies with Larry Katz in Torsten Wiesel's laboratory at Rockefeller University and was a postdoctoral student of David Tank at Bell Labs. In 1996 he joined the Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University, where he is Full Professor. In 2005 he became HHMI Investigator and co-director of the Kavli Institute for Brain Circuits and in 2014 Director of the Neurotechnology Center at Columbia. Yuste is interested in the structure and function of cortical circuits, the biophysical properties of dendritic spines and the pathophysiology of cortical diseases such as epilepsy and schizophrenia. To study these questions, Yuste has pioneered the development of imaging techniques, such as calcium imaging of neuronal circuits, two-photon imaging of spines and circuits, photostimulation using inorganic caged compounds, two-photon optogenetics and holographic microscopy. Yuste has obtained many awards, including New York City Mayor's, the Society for Neuroscience's Young Investigator and the NIH Director Pioneer Awards. Finally, he led the group of researchers who proposed the Brain Activity Map Project, recently sponsored by the White House's BRAIN initiative.

\r\n","biography_thumbnailed":"
Rafael Yuste is Professor of Biological Sciences and Neuroscience at Columbia University. He was born in Madrid, where he obtained his M.D. at the Universidad Autónoma. After a brief period in Sydney Brenner's laboratory in Cambridge, UK, he performed Ph.D. studies with Larry Katz in Torsten Wiesel’s laboratory at Rockefeller University and was a postdoctoral student of David Tank at Bell Labs. In 1996 he joined the Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University, where he is Full Professor. In 2005 he became HHMI Investigator and co-director of the Kavli Institute for Brain Circuits and in 2014 Director of the Neurotechnology Center at Columbia. Yuste is interested in the structure and function of cortical circuits, the biophysical properties of dendritic spines and the pathophysiology of cortical diseases such as epilepsy and schizophrenia. To study these questions, Yuste has pioneered the development of imaging techniques, such as calcium imaging of neuronal circuits, two-photon imaging of spines and circuits, photostimulation using inorganic caged compounds, two-photon optogenetics and holographic microscopy. Yuste has obtained many awards, including New York City Mayor's, the Society for Neuroscience's Young Investigator and the NIH Director Pioneer Awards. Finally, he led the group of researchers who proposed the Brain Activity Map Project, recently sponsored by the White House’s BRAIN initiative.


Rafael Yuste, M.D., ...

www.alleninstitute.org [cached]

Rafael Yuste, M.D., Ph.D.

Columbia University
Rafael Yuste is Professor of Biological Sciences and Neuroscience at Columbia University. He was born in Madrid, where he obtained his M.D. at the Universidad Autónoma. After a brief period in Sydney Brenner's laboratory in Cambridge, UK, he performed Ph.D. studies with Larry Katz in Torsten Wiesel's laboratory at Rockefeller University and was a postdoctoral student of David Tank at Bell Labs. In 1996 he joined the Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University, where he is Full Professor. In 2005 he became HHMI Investigator and co-director of the Kavli Institute for Brain Circuits and in 2014 Director of the Neurotechnology Center at Columbia. Yuste is interested in the structure and function of cortical circuits, the biophysical properties of dendritic spines and the pathophysiology of cortical diseases such as epilepsy and schizophrenia. To study these questions, Yuste has pioneered the development of imaging techniques, such as calcium imaging of neuronal circuits, two-photon imaging of spines and circuits, photostimulation using inorganic caged compounds, two-photon optogenetics and holographic microscopy. Yuste has obtained many awards, including New York City Mayor's, the Society for Neuroscience's Young Investigator and the NIH Director Pioneer Awards. Finally, he led the group of researchers who proposed the Brain Activity Map Project, recently sponsored by the White House's BRAIN initiative.


This cellular menagerie has left ...

fuckyeahbrainstuff.tumblr.com [cached]

This cellular menagerie has left researchers puzzling over how best to categorize what neuroscientist Rafael Yuste of Columbia University calls these "living creatures. So far, systematic methods are lacking. "Even after 100 years of research, we have no clue how many classes of neurons there are," says Yuste, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute researcher. He and other scientists are developing new algorithms to automate neuron classification, in the hope of someday compiling a standard "parts list" of the brain.


This cellular menagerie has left ...

fuckyeahbrainstuff.tumblr.com [cached]

This cellular menagerie has left researchers puzzling over how best to categorize what neuroscientist Rafael Yuste of Columbia University calls these "living creatures. So far, systematic methods are lacking. "Even after 100 years of research, we have no clue how many classes of neurons there are," says Yuste, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute researcher. He and other scientists are developing new algorithms to automate neuron classification, in the hope of someday compiling a standard "parts list" of the brain.


But exactly how the brain generates ...

www.bbc.co.uk [cached]

But exactly how the brain generates our mind is a mystery like no other in science, according to the neurobiologist Prof Rafael Yuste of Columbia University. "The challenge is precisely how to go from a physical substrate of cells that are connected inside this organ, to our mental world, our thoughts, our memories, our feelings," he says.

...
Here Itskov might get some unexpected help, according to Yuste - who helped bring about the world's biggest neuroscience research project, the Brain Initiative.
...
In research yet to be published, Yuste has for the first time imaged over time the hypnotic electrical flashes that make up the activity of nearly all the neurons - up to several thousand - in one of the simplest nervous systems in evolution, a tiny invertebrate called a hydra. "It was very exciting," he says.
...
Yuste is also very far from certain the brain works like a computer and could ever be copied in a machine. But because neuroscience cannot yet explain how exactly the brain gives rise to us and prove that mind uploading is impossible, he believes society should start considering what the consequences might be if Itskov succeeded in his ambition.
"The pathway that leads with the new neural technologies to our understanding of the brain is the same pathway that could lead, theoretically, to the possibility of mind uploading," says Yuste. "Scientists that are involved in these methods have the responsibility to think ahead."
Mind uploading would usher in a world fraught with risks.
"If you could replicate the mind and upload it into a different material, you can in principle clone minds," says Yuste.
...
But this assurance is not enough for Yuste, who sits on the Brain Initiative's ethics panel: "I would put mind uploading in the list of the topics that should be very carefully discussed and thought through."

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