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Wrong Preeti Jaggi?

Preeti Jaggi

Physician - Infectious Disease

Nationwide Children's Hospital

HQ Phone:  (614) 722-2000

Direct Phone: (614) ***-****direct phone

Email: p***@***.org

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Nationwide Children's Hospital

700 Children's Drive

Columbus, Ohio,43205

United States

Company Description

Named to the Top 10 Honor Roll on U.S. News & World Report's 2016-17 list of "America's Best Children's Hospitals," Nationwide Children's Hospital is America's largest not-for-profit freestanding pediatric healthcare system providing wellness, preventive, diag...more

Background Information

Employment History

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics

the Ohio State University College of Medicine


Web References(8 Total References)


Addressing the Threat of Antibiotic Resistance

www.childrenshospitals.org [cached]

Preeti Jaggi, M.D., is several years into her mission of making sure antibiotics are used only when indicated.
As an infectious diseases physician at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, Jaggi currently leads the hospital's Antibiotic Stewardship Program (ASP), which started in 2013-a program focused on driving improvements in antibiotic use in surgical areas and across all the hospital's services. "We, overall, are on the lower end of using antibiotics, but we have used PHIS to document that we were using some specific drugs more than others," Jaggi says. Jaggi believes the ability to share practices and discuss comparative data, like PHIS, have been very helpful to the ongoing stewardship work at Nationwide Children's as the team pushes to become smarter on antibiotic use.


Kawasaki Disease - PediaCast 203 -PediaCast

www.pediacast.org [cached]

Dr Preeti Jaggi and Dr John Kovalchin join Dr Mike Patrick in the PediaCast Studio to discuss Kawasaki Disease.
Dr Preeti Jaggi Dr. Preeti Jaggi is an Infectious Disease specialist here at Nationwide Children's Hospital and Dr. John Kovalchin is a pediatric cardiologist and Director of Echocardiography with the Heart Center here at Nationwide Children's. Dr. Preeti Jaggi is a physician with the Section of Infectious Diseases here at Nationwide Children's Hospital and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Ohio State University College of Medicine. After attending medical school at Ohio State, Dr. Jaggi traveled to Chicago where she completed her pediatric residency and Pediatric Infectious Disease fellowship at Loyola University Medical Center and Children's Memorial Hospital. 03:12 Of course, we're glad to have her back in Columbus and here with us in the PediaCast studio, so welcome to the show, Dr. Jaggi. Preeti Jaggi: Thank you. Let's start with Dr. Jaggi. If you could just define for us, if you can do that in a few sentences, just in general, what is Kawasaki disease? 04:08 Preeti Jaggi: Sure. Preeti Jaggi: Yes. Preeti Jaggi: It is a disease that causes inflammation of the vessels of the body. Preeti Jaggi: We can see it in older children. Preeti Jaggi: There's a slight predominance in boys and a little bit higher also in male infants, and it can be a little bit harder to diagnose in infants, but it can definitely affect both sexes. Preeti Jaggi: At this point, we don't know what for sure is the cause of Kawasaki, but we think that it is an infection, probably a virus or maybe a group of viruses that may be very, very common that all people are exposed to but only some people who might be predisposed to have this intense inflammation response are the people that actually get the disease. Preeti Jaggi: Correct. Preeti Jaggi: Absolutely. Preeti Jaggi: Typically, we're seeing fever at least 100.5 or greater is when we're thinking about it. Preeti Jaggi: For the most part. Preeti Jaggi: There's definitely a rash that can happen in Kawasaki. Preeti Jaggi: Right. Preeti Jaggi: No. Preeti Jaggi: One of the major things that we look for is Adenovirus. John Kovalchin: The main heart complication that we worry about is involvement of the coronary arteries, and those are the very small, tiny blood vessels that supply oxygen and blood flow to the heart, and as Dr. Jaggi said, Kawasaki disease is a diffuse vasculitis or inflammation of the small- and medium-sized blood vessels, and that includes the coronary arteries. That's a medicine that's given to help modify the immune response that the body is having, and Dr. Jaggi went into that a little bit. Preeti Jaggi: We usually see them together. Preeti Jaggi: Yes. Preeti Jaggi: And I would probably just recommend to parents that it's really important for us to think about the diagnosis. Preeti Jaggi: At this point, we really don't know what the cause is, so we don't have any way to prevent it. Before we let you go, off the hook, one of the things that we ask all of our guests at PediaCast is, if you remember from your own childhood or now with your own families, board games, because we like to encourage parents to do some fun interactive stuff with their kids that doesn't necessarily involve TV screens and computer screens and iPads and iPhones and all of those things, so if you just think back, Dr. Jaggi, what's one of your favorite board games? Preeti Jaggi: Board games? Preeti Jaggi: That is our ritual every night when we come home is playing Uno right now. Preeti Jaggi: That's a fun one. Preeti Jaggi: We go with the standard rules. This entry was posted in PediaCast and tagged Advanced Noninvasive Cardiac Imaging Fellowship, Cardiology Fellowship, Clinical Researchers, Heart Center, Hospital-Based Research Faculty, Infectious Diseases, Infectious Diseases Fellowship, Jaggi, John P. Kovalchin, kawasaki disease, Kovalchin, Pediatrics, preeti jaggi by Dr. Mike.


www.columbusmonthly.com

Preeti Jaggi
Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus 614-722-4452


www.infectioncontroltoday.com

"Kawasaki disease and acute adenoviral infection can present with many of the same clinical characteristics," says Preeti Jaggi, MD, member of the Section of Infectious Diseases at Nationwide Children's and lead study author.
"Given the similarities, human adenovirus infection is one of the most frequent conditions included on the differential diagnosis when considering Kawasaki disease. However, few data are available regarding the differences in frequency, viral load and types of detectable human adenovirus in Kawasaki disease patients and in children who have adenovirus disease that mimicks Kawasaki disease. The study aimed to determine whether there are differences in the amount of human adenovirus in the upper airway in children with human adenovirus infection versus those diagnosed with Kawasaki disease. Jaggi and her team compared Kawasaki disease patients who were positive for human adenovirus infection with other patients diagnosed with human adenovirus infection during a two year period at Nationwide Children's. Among 77 Kawasaki disease patients, nearly 13 percent had human adenovirus detected. "Evidence suggests that human adenovirus strains can persist in pediatric adenoids and tonsils and are capable of low level shedding. PCR analysis can detect non-replicating virus," says Jaggi, who is also assistant professor of clinical pediatrics at Ohio State University College of Medicine. "This may explain why PCR, but not viral culture, could detect human adenovirus in these Kawasaki disease patients." The findings indicate that detection of human adenovirus in a patient with suspected Kawasaki disease should be interpreted with caution. "Detection of human adenovirus in these patients is fairly common and does not exclude the diagnosis of Kawasaki disease," says Jaggi. According to Jaggi, quantitative PCR, culture and human adenovirus typing methods may help distinguish human adenovirus disease mimicking Kawasaki disease from Kawasaki disease with accompanying human adenovirus detection.


www.eurekalert.org

"Kawasaki disease and acute adenoviral infection can present with many of the same clinical characteristics," says Preeti Jaggi, MD, member of the Section of Infectious Diseases at Nationwide Children's and lead study author.
"Given the similarities, human adenovirus infection is one of the most frequent conditions included on the differential diagnosis when considering Kawasaki disease. However, few data are available regarding the differences in frequency, viral load and types of detectable human adenovirus in Kawasaki disease patients and in children who have adenovirus disease that mimicks Kawasaki disease. The study aimed to determine whether there are differences in the amount of human adenovirus in the upper airway in children with human adenovirus infection versus those diagnosed with Kawasaki disease. Dr. Jaggi and her team compared Kawasaki disease patients who were positive for human adenovirus infection with other patients diagnosed with human adenovirus infection during a two year period at Nationwide Children's. Among 77 Kawasaki disease patients, nearly 13 percent had human adenovirus detected. "Evidence suggests that human adenovirus strains can persist in pediatric adenoids and tonsils and are capable of low level shedding. PCR analysis can detect non-replicating virus," says Dr. Jaggi, also assistant professor of Clinical Pediatrics at The Ohio State University College of Medicine. "This may explain why PCR, but not viral culture, could detect human adenovirus in these Kawasaki disease patients." The findings indicate that detection of human adenovirus in a patient with suspected Kawasaki disease should be interpreted with caution. "Detection of human adenovirus in these patients is fairly common and does not exclude the diagnosis of Kawasaki disease," says Dr. Jaggi. According to Dr. Jaggi, quantitative PCR, culture and human adenovirus typing methods may help distinguish human adenovirus disease mimicking Kawasaki disease from Kawasaki disease with accompanying human adenovirus detection. ### For more information on Dr. Preeti Jaggi, visit http://www.nationwidechildrens.org/preeti-jaggi


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