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Pieter A. Cohen

General Internist

Cambridge Health Alliance

HQ Phone:  (617) 665-1000

Email: p***@***.org

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Cambridge Health Alliance

1493 Cambridge Street

Cambridge, Massachusetts,02139

United States

Company Description

At CHA, we are dedicated to serving our neighborhoods and our employees are at the heart of this compassionate, quality care. We are building a skilled, dynamic workforce to meet patient needs, and are looking for experienced professionals to join our mission....more

Background Information

Employment History

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Harvard Companies, Inc.


Web References(199 Total References)


Work Out Like A Celebrity With These Fitness Trends | leanonlife

www.leanonlife.com [cached]

According to Pieter Cohen, M.D., general internist at Cambridge Health Alliance, the majority of supplements that claim to give you an energy boost before a workout or that say they're hormone-based aren't really effective.
What's more, Cohen explains that such substances often contain ingredients that are mislabelled and illegal.


Joins us at the next French Society of Burns Patients congress - TOULON - FRANCE | Symatese

www.symatese.com [cached]

Who's calling? http://imogenlloydwebber.com/press/ kiss fighting head 1000 male enhancement wants safety "We found that, instead of anything from an orchid, it had an unlisted, practically unknown, cousin of methamphetamine," said study researcher said Dr. Pieter Cohen, an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and a general internist at Cambridge Health Alliance in Boston.


www.healthywire.ca

"I'd rather spend $170 on fruits and vegetables and other wholesome foods and cook them at home than on a genetic test," said Dr. Pieter Cohen, an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and a general internist at Cambridge Health Alliance.
"It's very unfortunate this is already being sold to people to use," Cohen said. "We have decades of data in weight loss that a balanced diet is the way to go," Cohen said. "They're saying that, with their test, only 5 percent of people are responsive to a balanced diet," he said. "I expect there to be a continued explosion," of research in this area, Cohen said. "But whether or not that will translate into actual benefit to us as a society is really unknown at this time." "[I] think that a deep understanding of the genes of obesity would not be as effective as serious, aggressive public health approaches to the obesity epidemic," including improving access to healthy foods and promoting activity in the workplace, Cohen said.


www.healthywire.ca

"This is exactly the same issue that we're faced with here," said Dr. Pieter Cohen, a general internist at Cambridge Health Alliance and an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.
Cohen said that due to their surveillance procedures for drugs, researchers in Hong Kong are "often on the vanguard of identifying problems." "Fenfluramine is the bad actor of the Fen-phen diet pill," said Cohen, referring to the weight-loss drug pulled from the U.S. market in 1997 for its association with heart attacks. A second banned substance found in the supplements, the laxative phenolphthalein, was outlawed because of an association with cancer. Cohen said perhaps the most disturbing finding was the presence of analog drugs in the supplements. Analogs are drug molecules that have been further modified in a lab. "This hasn't even been studied in mice," said Cohen. "This is really using the consumer... as guinea pigs." The fact that herbal supplements may contain pharmaceuticals, allowing pills to show benefit to consumers while under the guise of being natural, is not a new discovery. But Cohen said findings like these make trouble for consumers, as they cannot simply make a choice to take a supplement based on the research. "In this case, as soon as you start dealing with adulterants, there's no ability to make decisions, because you don't know what is in there or what the side effects are," he said.


News - Personal Injury Blog - Page 8

www.ligoricappylaw.com [cached]

The new findings are concerning because they suggest that, even when the FDA tests supplements and discovers prohibited ingredients, the agency doesn't always remove these dangerous products, said Dr. Pieter Cohen, an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and a general internist at Cambridge Health Alliance in Boston.
"What's the point of identifying products [with prohibited drugs] if you can't take them off the marketplace? said Cohen, who was not involved in the new study. The recalls described in the new study are voluntary, meaning the FDA asked the manufacturer to recall the product but did not mandate it. It's not clear why 110 products were found to contain drugs but were not recalled, Cohen said. One possibility, Cohen said, is that the FDA couldn't get in touch with the manufacturer. Indeed, a recent investigation by the Office of the Inspector General found that the FDA did not have accurate contact information for 20 percent of the supplement manufacturers. It's also possible the FDA contacted the manufacturer, but the manufacturer refused to comply, Cohen said. "The consumer is flying blind when it comes to purchasing supplements," Cohen said. Until manufacturers follow the law - and the FDA enforces it - "these huge categories of supplements need to be completely avoided," he said. A 2011 study by Cohen and his colleagues found that even supplements that are recalled can still be bought by consumers. The study found that the weight-loss supplement Pai You Guo, which was recalled in 2009 because it contained a banned drug, could still be bought at retail stores. Cohen said his lab recently tested a sexual-enhancement drug and found it contained pharmaceuticals. Even though the lab alerted the FDA about the supplement - called Sex Plus - in December 2012, the FDA has yet to warn consumers about it, Cohen said. The dietary supplements that are tested and recalled by the FDA are likely just "the tip of the iceberg," in terms of the percentage of supplements that contain prohibited drugs, Cohen said. Consumers who want to buy supplements should stick with vitamins and minerals, or single-ingredient supplements, Cohen said. They should look for supplements that have been certified by the U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention or NSF International, which can provide reassurance that the products contain the proper dosage of ingredients and that they don't contain illegal ingredients, Cohen said.


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