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Wrong Pierre Sokolsky?

Pierre V. Sokolsky

Dean of the College of Science

University of Utah

HQ Phone:  (801) 581-7200

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

University of Utah

201 Presidents Circle Room 201

Salt Lake City, Utah,84112

United States

Company Description

The University of Utah is one of over 1,100 institutions of higher education to participate in the America Reads challenge, including Salt Lake Community College and Westminster College. In 2010, the America Reads program at the University of Utah adopted a ...more

Background Information

Employment History

Dean

University of Utah College of Science


Chair, Physics Department

University of Utah Physics Department


Assistant Professor

Columbia University, Nevis Labs


Affiliations

The International Society for Optical Engineering

Member


American Physical Society

Member


Guggenheim Foundation

Fellow


Education

BA degree

University of Chicago


MS


PhD degree

University of Illinois


Web References(94 Total References)


Science Dean Named Distinguished Professor

telescopearray.org [cached]

Pierre V. Sokolsky, dean of the College of Science, was named a University of Utah Distinguished Professor of Physics and Astronomy, effective July 1, 2011.
"The rank of Distinguished Professor is reserved for selected individuals whose achievements exemplify the highest goals of scholarship as demonstrated my recognition accorded to them from peers with national and international stature, and whose record includes evidence of a high dedication to teaching as demonstrated by recognition accorded to them by students and/or colleagues," according to University Policy and Procedures 6-300. Sokolsky is a world-renowned expert in ultrahigh-energy particle physics, including gamma rays, cosmic rays, and neutrinos. He is a member of the American Physical Society and the International Society of Optical Engineering. In 1999, he was awarded the University of Utah Distinguished Research Award and, in 2002, was named a Guggenheim Foundation Fellow. He has written several textbooks and book chapters and has published more than 200 papers, including 58 research articles in peer-reviewed journals. He earned the Utah Governor's Medal for Science and Technology in 2006 for his distinguished service to the State of Utah in science and technology. Research projects initiated by Sokolsky have generated more than $14 million in funding support to the State of Utah and created jobs in optics and in the construction of buildings and roads. In 2004, Sokolsky spearheaded the U's $17 million Telescope Array project to be located just west of Delta, Utah, to study ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays in collaboration with scientists form the University of New Mexico, the University of Montana, the University of Tokyo Institute for Cosmic Ray Research and several other Japanese universities. The research site, which includes 560 particle detectors and three fluorescence detectors, covers nearly 400 square miles and will be complete in September 2007. "This new experiment will increase the sensitivity to the highest-energy cosmic rays by tenfold," says Sokolsky. Sokolsky also launched a long-term strategy to develop a comprehensive astronomy research program at the U, and to offer undergraduate and graduate degrees in astronomy.


Enormous Cosmic Ray Detector Gets New Visitor Center in Delta

www.telescopearray.org [cached]

Pierre Sokolsky
"These particles are streaming towards us. It's like looking down the barrel of a gun," said professor Pierre Sokolsky, dean of the University of Utah's College of Science. "Well, that's the billion dollar question," Sokolsky said. Sokolsky said the effort to understand these awesome centers of energy in the Universe may go on for years. He said the knowledge that might come from that has an unknown potential for practical applications, but as a pure question of science, human curiosity makes it an exciting project. "It's the mystery. It's the chase," said Sokolsky.


Cosmic Ray Observatory Planned in Utah

www.telescopearray.org [cached]

The Japanese government has promised $12 million toward construction, while American universities hope to raise another $5 million to $6 million in U.S. government grants, said Pierre Sokolsky, a physics professor at the University of Utah and principal investigator for the project.
The University of New Mexico and the University of Montana are also part of the project. Scientists hope the Telescope Array will help explain the mystery behind what is hurling high-energy cosmic rays, or subatomic particles, through space. There are a number of theories for what force is behind these rays, including energy that got caught in cracks in space-time during the Big Bang, or previously unseen matter from far away, Sokolsky said.


Cosmic Ray Observatory Planned

www.telescopearray.org [cached]

American universities hope to raise another $5 million to $6 million in U.S. government grants by mid-2005 to enhance the observatory's capabilities, says Pierre Sokolsky, professor and chair of physics at the University of Utah.
"Something out there is producing subatomic particles with energies that a lead brick has when you drop it on your toe," Sokolsky says. But research at the High-Resolution Fly's will end in a few years because "we have learned as much as we can with that configuration," says Sokolsky, who calls the Telescope Array "a natural next step." Operation of the High-Resolution Fly's Eye has become difficult - especially for foreign students and faculty - due to its presence on a military base. For two years after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon, the University of Utah had to hire people with security clearances to enter Dugway and operate the observatory. Meanwhile, a Japanese cosmic ray observatory named AGASA - which uses scintillation detectors like those proposed for the Telescope Array - has operated for 10 years but will be dismantled next year. Clouds, humidity and air pollution make more sensitive fluorescence-detector observatories there impractical, Sokolsky says. Sokolsky says that will allow them to study cosmic rays with a wide range of energies - from high to ultrahigh - to gain a better understanding of their source.


Science Dean Named Distinguished Professor

www.telescopearray.org [cached]

Pierre V. Sokolsky, dean of the College of Science, was named a University of Utah Distinguished Professor of Physics and Astronomy, effective July 1, 2011.
"The rank of Distinguished Professor is reserved for selected individuals whose achievements exemplify the highest goals of scholarship as demonstrated my recognition accorded to them from peers with national and international stature, and whose record includes evidence of a high dedication to teaching as demonstrated by recognition accorded to them by students and/or colleagues," according to University Policy and Procedures 6-300. Sokolsky is a world-renowned expert in ultrahigh-energy particle physics, including gamma rays, cosmic rays, and neutrinos. He is a member of the American Physical Society and the International Society of Optical Engineering. In 1999, he was awarded the University of Utah Distinguished Research Award and, in 2002, was named a Guggenheim Foundation Fellow. He has written several textbooks and book chapters and has published more than 200 papers, including 58 research articles in peer-reviewed journals. He earned the Utah Governor's Medal for Science and Technology in 2006 for his distinguished service to the State of Utah in science and technology. Research projects initiated by Sokolsky have generated more than $14 million in funding support to the State of Utah and created jobs in optics and in the construction of buildings and roads. In 2004, Sokolsky spearheaded the U's $17 million Telescope Array project to be located just west of Delta, Utah, to study ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays in collaboration with scientists form the University of New Mexico, the University of Montana, the University of Tokyo Institute for Cosmic Ray Research and several other Japanese universities. The research site, which includes 560 particle detectors and three fluorescence detectors, covers nearly 400 square miles and will be complete in September 2007. "This new experiment will increase the sensitivity to the highest-energy cosmic rays by tenfold," says Sokolsky. Sokolsky also launched a long-term strategy to develop a comprehensive astronomy research program at the U, and to offer undergraduate and graduate degrees in astronomy.


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