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Wrong Pierre Sokolsky?

Pierre V. Sokolsky

Dean

University of Utah College of Science

HQ Phone:  (801) 581-7200

Email: s***@***.edu

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University of Utah College of Science

1430 Presidents Circle Rm 220

Salt Lake City, Utah,84112

United States

Find other employees at this company (85)

Background Information

Employment History

Dean, College of Science

Physics and Astronomy


Dean

Utah Museum of Fine Arts


Telescope Array Project


Dean

College of Science, Dean's Office, University of Utah


Chair and Professor of Physics

Utah State University


Chair, Physics Department

University of Utah Physics Department


Assistant Professor

Columbia University, Nevis Labs


Affiliations

University of Utah

Distinguished Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Dean Emeritus, College of Science


The International Society for Optical Engineering

Member


American Physical Society

Member


Guggenheim Foundation

Fellow


Education

BA degree

University of Chicago


MS


PhD degree

University of Illinois


Web References(93 Total References)


Study comfirms 1966 prediction

www.telescopearray.org [cached]

"It has been the goal of much of ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray physics for the past 40 years to find this cutoff or disprove it," says physics Professor Pierre Sokolsky, dean of the University of Utah College of Science and leader of the study by a collaboration of 60 scientists from seven research institutions.
Last November, the Auger observatory collaboration - to which Sokolsky also belongs - published a study suggesting that the highest-energy cosmic rays come from active galactic nuclei or AGNs, or the hearts of extremely active galaxies believed to harbor supermassive black holes. "We still don't know where they're coming from, but they're coming from far away," Sokolsky says. "Quite apart from arcane physics, we are talking about understanding the origin of the most energetic particles produced by the most energetic acceleration process in the universe," Sokolsky says. Sokolsky and University of Utah physicist George Cassiday won the prestigious 2008 Panofsky Prize for developing the method. Sokolsky says there is debate over whether the "ankle" represents cosmic rays that run out of "oomph" after being spewed by exploding stars in our galaxy, or the loss of energy predicted to occur when ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays from outside our galaxy collide with the big bang's afterglow, generating electrons and antimatter positrons. The Telescope Array and Auger observatories will keep looking for the source of rare ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays that evade the big bang afterglow and reach Earth. "The most reasonable assumption is they are coming from a class of active galactic nuclei called blazars," Sokolsky says. Such a galaxy center is suspected to harbor a supermassive black hole with the mass of a billion or so suns. As matter is sucked into the black hole, nearby matter is spewed outward in the form of a beam-like jet. When such a jet is pointed at Earth, the galaxy is known as a blazar. "It's like looking down the barrel of a gun," Sokolsky says.


www.spacedaily.com

"It has been the goal of much of ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray physics for the past 40 years to find this cutoff or disprove it," says physics Professor Pierre Sokolsky, dean of the University of Utah College of Science and leader of the study by a collaboration of 60 scientists from seven research institutions.Last November, the Auger observatory collaboration - to which Sokolsky also belongs - published a study suggesting that the highest-energy cosmic rays come from active galactic nuclei or AGNs, or the hearts of extremely active galaxies believed to harbor supermassive black holes."We still don't know where they're coming from, but they're coming from far away," Sokolsky says."Quite apart from arcane physics, we are talking about understanding the origin of the most energetic particles produced by the most energetic acceleration process in the universe," Sokolsky says.Sokolsky and University of Utah physicist George Cassiday won the prestigious 2008 Panofsky Prize for developing the method.Sokolsky says there is debate over whether the "ankle" represents cosmic rays that run out of "oomph" after being spewed by exploding stars in our galaxy, or the loss of energy predicted to occur when ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays from outside our galaxy collide with the big bang's afterglow, generating electrons and antimatter positrons.The Telescope Array and Auger observatories will keep looking for the source of rare ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays that evade the big bang afterglow and reach Earth."The most reasonable assumption is they are coming from a class of active galactic nuclei called blazars," Sokolsky says.Such a galaxy center is suspected to harbor a supermassive black hole with the mass of a billion or so suns.As matter is sucked into the black hole, nearby matter is spewed outward in the form of a beam-like jet.When such a jet is pointed at Earth, the galaxy is known as a blazar."It's like looking down the barrel of a gun," Sokolsky says.


www.telescopearray.org

"It has been the goal of much of ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray physics for the past 40 years to find this cutoff or disprove it," says physics Professor Pierre Sokolsky, dean of the University of Utah College of Science and leader of the study by a collaboration of 60 scientists from seven research institutions.
Last November, the Auger observatory collaboration - to which Sokolsky also belongs - published a study suggesting that the highest-energy cosmic rays come from active galactic nuclei or AGNs, or the hearts of extremely active galaxies believed to harbor supermassive black holes. "We still don't know where they're coming from, but they're coming from far away," Sokolsky says. "Quite apart from arcane physics, we are talking about understanding the origin of the most energetic particles produced by the most energetic acceleration process in the universe," Sokolsky says. Sokolsky and University of Utah physicist George Cassiday won the prestigious 2008 Panofsky Prize for developing the method. Sokolsky says there is debate over whether the "ankle" represents cosmic rays that run out of "oomph" after being spewed by exploding stars in our galaxy, or the loss of energy predicted to occur when ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays from outside our galaxy collide with the big bang's afterglow, generating electrons and antimatter positrons. The Telescope Array and Auger observatories will keep looking for the source of rare ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays that evade the big bang afterglow and reach Earth. "The most reasonable assumption is they are coming from a class of active galactic nuclei called blazars," Sokolsky says. Such a galaxy center is suspected to harbor a supermassive black hole with the mass of a billion or so suns. As matter is sucked into the black hole, nearby matter is spewed outward in the form of a beam-like jet. When such a jet is pointed at Earth, the galaxy is known as a blazar. "It's like looking down the barrel of a gun," Sokolsky says. "Those guys are the most likely candidates for the source of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays." The journal Physical Review Letters published the results Friday, March 21. The new study's 60 co-authors include Sokolsky, Jui and 31 other University of Utah faculty members, postdoctoral fellows and students: Rasha Abbasi, Tareq Abu-Zayyad, Monica Allen, Greg Archbold, Konstantin Belov, John Belz, S. Adam Blake, Olga Brusova, Gary W. Burt, Chris Cannon, Zhen Cao, Weiran Deng, Yulia Fedorova, Richard C. Gray, William Hanlon, Petra Huntemeyer, Benjamin Jones, Kiyoung Kim, the late Eugene Loh, Melissa Maestas, Kai Martens, John N. Matthews, Steffanie Moore, Kevin Reil, Robertson Riehle, Douglas Rodriguez, Jeremy D. Smith, R. Wayne Springer, Benjamin Stokes, Stanton Thomas, Jason Thomas and Lawrence Wiencke.


www.ScienceCitizen.com

"It has been the goal of much of ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray physics for the past 40 years to find this cutoff or disprove it," says physics Professor Pierre Sokolsky, dean of the University of Utah College of Science and leader of the study by a collaboration of 60 scientists from seven research institutions.Last November, the Auger observatory collaboration - to which Sokolsky also belongs - published a study suggesting that the highest-energy cosmic rays come from active galactic nuclei or AGNs, or the hearts of extremely active galaxies believed to harbor supermassive black holes."We still don't know where they're coming from, but they're coming from far away," Sokolsky says."Quite apart from arcane physics, we are talking about understanding the origin of the most energetic particles produced by the most energetic acceleration process in the universe," Sokolsky says.Sokolsky and University of Utah physicist George Cassiday won the prestigious 2008 Panofsky Prize for developing the method.Sokolsky says there is debate over whether the "ankle" represents cosmic rays that run out of "oomph" after being spewed by exploding stars in our galaxy, or the loss of energy predicted to occur when ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays from outside our galaxy collide with the big bang's afterglow, generating electrons and antimatter positrons.The Telescope Array and Auger observatories will keep looking for the source of rare ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays that evade the big bang afterglow and reach Earth."The most reasonable assumption is they are coming from a class of active galactic nuclei called blazars," Sokolsky says.Such a galaxy center is suspected to harbor a supermassive black hole with the mass of a billion or so suns.As matter is sucked into the black hole, nearby matter is spewed outward in the form of a beam-like jet.When such a jet is pointed at Earth, the galaxy is known as a blazar. "It's like looking down the barrel of a gun," Sokolsky says.


www.eurekalert.org

"It has been the goal of much of ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray physics for the past 40 years to find this cutoff or disprove it," says physics Professor Pierre Sokolsky, dean of the University of Utah College of Science and leader of the study by a collaboration of 60 scientists from seven research institutions.Last November, the Auger observatory collaboration - to which Sokolsky also belongs - published a study suggesting that the highest-energy cosmic rays come from active galactic nuclei or AGNs, or the hearts of extremely active galaxies believed to harbor supermassive black holes."We still don't know where they're coming from, but they're coming from far away," Sokolsky says."Quite apart from arcane physics, we are talking about understanding the origin of the most energetic particles produced by the most energetic acceleration process in the universe," Sokolsky says."It's a question of how much energy the universe can pack into these extraordinarily tiny particles known as cosmic rays. ... He adds: "Looking at energy processes at the very edge of what's possible in the universe is going to tell us how well we understand nature."Sokolsky and University of Utah physicist George Cassiday won the prestigious 2008 Panofsky Prize for developing the method.Sokolsky says there is debate over whether the "ankle" represents cosmic rays that run out of "oomph" after being spewed by exploding stars in our galaxy, or the loss of energy predicted to occur when ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays from outside our galaxy collide with the big bang's afterglow, generating electrons and antimatter positrons.The Telescope Array and Auger observatories will keep looking for the source of rare ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays that evade the big bang afterglow and reach Earth."The most reasonable assumption is they are coming from a class of active galactic nuclei called blazars," Sokolsky says.Such a galaxy center is suspected to harbor a supermassive black hole with the mass of a billion or so suns.As matter is sucked into the black hole, nearby matter is spewed outward in the form of a beam-like jet.When such a jet is pointed at Earth, the galaxy is known as a blazar. "It's like looking down the barrel of a gun," Sokolsky says."Those guys are the most likely candidates for the source of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays."###The new study's 60 co-authors include Sokolsky, Jui and 31 other University of Utah faculty members, postdoctoral fellows and students: Rasha Abbasi, Tareq Abu-Zayyad, Monica Allen, Greg Archbold, Konstantin Belov, John Belz, S. Adam Blake, Olga Brusova, Gary W. Burt, Chris Cannon, Zhen Cao, Weiran Deng, Yulia Fedorova, Richard C. Gray, William Hanlon, Petra Huntemeyer, Benjamin Jones, Kiyoung Kim, the late Eugene Loh, Melissa Maestas, Kai Martens, John N. Matthews, Steffanie Moore, Kevin Reil, Robertson Riehle, Douglas Rodriguez, Jeremy D. Smith, R. Wayne Springer, Benjamin Stokes, Stanton Thomas, Jason Thomas and Lawrence Wiencke.


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