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Wrong Philip Otterbein?

Rev. Philip Otterbein William

Minister

Tulpehocken Area School District

HQ Phone: (717) 933-4611x2118

Tulpehocken Area School District

27 Rehrersburg Road

Bethel, Pennsylvania 19507

United States

Company Description

TVA is Tulpehocken's cyber school that was established in 2009-2010 school year. We offer full-time, part-time, and hybrid online programs for students in grades K-12. Full-time TVA students are offered a laptop, printer/scanner, and monthly internet stip... more

Find other employees at this company (159)

Background Information

Employment History

Scholarly Pastor
Dutch Reformed Church

Affiliations

Co-Founder
United Brethren

Founder
Church of the United Brethren

Web References (158 Total References)


The editors of Leben recount life ...

www.wnd.com [cached]

The editors of Leben recount life of Philip William Otterbein

...
Of the six, one of the ablest was Philip Otterbein, the young man from Hebron, who had been exposed to the Pietist movement and whose convictions soon chaffed under the oversight of the Dutch Calvinists. While the Dutch Reformed were by most assessments the most missionary minded of the European Protestants, they were also deeply committed to their confessions. The Germans, whose own German Reformed Church was destitute and unable to provide assistance, found common ground with the Dutch in the Heidelberg Catechism, the most ecumenical of the continental confessions, but the more rigorously Calvinistic Canons of Dordt were new to them, and with men such as Otterbein, did not sit well.
Philip Otterbein
Early in his ministry, Otterbein rejected the Canons Predestinarian view and embraced Arminianism, the free-will theology of Jacob Arminius that the Synod of Dordt had so strenuously opposed.
...
Into such a brew, Otterbein received a call from the Reformed congregation at Lancaster, which he accepted. His sermons were well-prepared and well-received, but it proved to be Otterbein himself who was not profiting from his own ministry. He recounts a case where, upon delivering a sermon one Sunday morning on faith and repentance, he was approached by a man who had been deeply affected by the Word.
...
While Otterbein was not connected to the Arminian group, he was clearly drawn to their emphasis on experience and practical sanctification. He differed, however, in a firm conviction that the subjective and objective elements of the faith needed to be present in equal measure. To this end, he maintained his alliance with the Reformed Church, remaining on the rolls of the Coetus until his death. He believed in church discipline and submission to one another among the brethren, but rejected the elements of formalism that suited neither his own temperament, nor that of the colonial mind.
...
Otterbein would minister for a time at Tulpehocken, where the extreme sectarian Conrad Beissel had found many recruits for his Ephrata Commune.
...
At Tulpehocken, Otterbein instituted the prayer meetings where he stressed the need to inquire into the state of one's soul. He also sought to interview congregants individually before communion, a practice which he had instituted at Lancaster and which was apparently unknown among the churches of that time.
Thus, while Otterbein demanded a liberty in the pulpit, he was no friend of license. Members of his congregation were expected to manifest Christian character and profession. Those who preferred outward ceremony alone found the path difficult with the pastor who was intent upon inquiring after their souls.
While the sectarians, in general, moved as far away from oversight and submission to the brethren as possible, Otterbein was actually more rigorous than some of his Reformed fellow pastors, requiring not only outward profession of the truth, but also the "hearty trust" demanded by the Heidelberg Catechism. A number of men in the Reformed Church were warm toward Otterbein, despite his irregular methods and preaching. They did not countenance what they considered his clearly unorthodox views of salvation, which they believed was based upon the idea that the will was not fallen in Adam's sin. Yet, they were charmed by his brotherly spirit and earnest desire to see people converted to Christ.
...
As the years progressed, Otterbein would evidence a broad ecumenicism in his contacts, embracing the Mennonite revivalist Martin Boehm at the seminal gathering at Isaac Long's barn and declaring, "We are brethren!"
...
Was Otterbein founding a new church denomination? Did he see the Brethren movement as a new ecclesiastical body? To the modern reader, the answer would appear to be "Yes," but such a conclusion does not fit well with either Otterbein's theology or certain elements of the historical record. Otterbein had accepted the position of bishop (after the Methodist manner) along with Boehm in the United Brethren church, so undoubtedly a new organization did exist.
...
Still, the disaffection was gradual and though de facto, it was not de jure, that is it was a practical reality without being formalized, for Otterbein never withdrew his German Reformed affiliation and the synod never excluded him.
...
Otterbein did not attend, at first, but when summoned and requested to address his brethren, he did so with great feeling, stressing the need to preach the new birth in terms that the people in the pews could apprehend.
...
As Otterbein arose and leaned upon his cane, he saluted his brethren and said, "Adieu, Brueder!"
One of those attending the synod records that he met one of his church members on the trip home who inquired, "Well, what have you done with Mr. O?"
...
Otterbein would live another seven years, never severing his relationship with the church of his birth, but practically speaking, his filial affections notwithstanding, his labors were entirely devoted to the United Brethren.
...
The church where Otterbein ministered in Baltimore still stands and is occupied by the Old Otterbein United Methodist Church.


The editors of Leben recount life ...

www.wnd.com [cached]

The editors of Leben recount life of Philip William Otterbein

...
Of the six, one of the ablest was Philip Otterbein, the young man from Hebron, who had been exposed to the Pietist movement and whose convictions soon chaffed under the oversight of the Dutch Calvinists. While the Dutch Reformed were by most assessments the most missionary minded of the European Protestants, they were also deeply committed to their confessions. The Germans, whose own German Reformed Church was destitute and unable to provide assistance, found common ground with the Dutch in the Heidelberg Catechism, the most ecumenical of the continental confessions, but the more rigorously Calvinistic Canons of Dordt were new to them, and with men such as Otterbein, did not sit well.
Philip Otterbein
Early in his ministry, Otterbein rejected the Canons Predestinarian view and embraced Arminianism, the free-will theology of Jacob Arminius that the Synod of Dordt had so strenuously opposed.
...
Into such a brew, Otterbein received a call from the Reformed congregation at Lancaster, which he accepted. His sermons were well-prepared and well-received, but it proved to be Otterbein himself who was not profiting from his own ministry. He recounts a case where, upon delivering a sermon one Sunday morning on faith and repentance, he was approached by a man who had been deeply affected by the Word.
...
While Otterbein was not connected to the Arminian group, he was clearly drawn to their emphasis on experience and practical sanctification. He differed, however, in a firm conviction that the subjective and objective elements of the faith needed to be present in equal measure. To this end, he maintained his alliance with the Reformed Church, remaining on the rolls of the Coetus until his death. He believed in church discipline and submission to one another among the brethren, but rejected the elements of formalism that suited neither his own temperament, nor that of the colonial mind.
...
Otterbein would minister for a time at Tulpehocken, where the extreme sectarian Conrad Beissel had found many recruits for his Ephrata Commune.
...
At Tulpehocken, Otterbein instituted the prayer meetings where he stressed the need to inquire into the state of one's soul. He also sought to interview congregants individually before communion, a practice which he had instituted at Lancaster and which was apparently unknown among the churches of that time.
Thus, while Otterbein demanded a liberty in the pulpit, he was no friend of license. Members of his congregation were expected to manifest Christian character and profession. Those who preferred outward ceremony alone found the path difficult with the pastor who was intent upon inquiring after their souls.
While the sectarians, in general, moved as far away from oversight and submission to the brethren as possible, Otterbein was actually more rigorous than some of his Reformed fellow pastors, requiring not only outward profession of the truth, but also the "hearty trust" demanded by the Heidelberg Catechism. A number of men in the Reformed Church were warm toward Otterbein, despite his irregular methods and preaching. They did not countenance what they considered his clearly unorthodox views of salvation, which they believed was based upon the idea that the will was not fallen in Adam's sin. Yet, they were charmed by his brotherly spirit and earnest desire to see people converted to Christ.
...
As the years progressed, Otterbein would evidence a broad ecumenicism in his contacts, embracing the Mennonite revivalist Martin Boehm at the seminal gathering at Isaac Long's barn and declaring, "We are brethren!"
...
Was Otterbein founding a new church denomination? Did he see the Brethren movement as a new ecclesiastical body? To the modern reader, the answer would appear to be "Yes," but such a conclusion does not fit well with either Otterbein's theology or certain elements of the historical record. Otterbein had accepted the position of bishop (after the Methodist manner) along with Boehm in the United Brethren church, so undoubtedly a new organization did exist.
...
Still, the disaffection was gradual and though de facto, it was not de jure, that is it was a practical reality without being formalized, for Otterbein never withdrew his German Reformed affiliation and the synod never excluded him.
...
Otterbein did not attend, at first, but when summoned and requested to address his brethren, he did so with great feeling, stressing the need to preach the new birth in terms that the people in the pews could apprehend.
...
As Otterbein arose and leaned upon his cane, he saluted his brethren and said, "Adieu, Brueder!"
One of those attending the synod records that he met one of his church members on the trip home who inquired, "Well, what have you done with Mr. O?"
...
Otterbein would live another seven years, never severing his relationship with the church of his birth, but practically speaking, his filial affections notwithstanding, his labors were entirely devoted to the United Brethren.
...
The church where Otterbein ministered in Baltimore still stands and is occupied by the Old Otterbein United Methodist Church.


In the Evangelical United ...

www.christumcknox.com [cached]

In the Evangelical United Brethren heritage, for example, Philip William Otterbein, the principal founder of the United Brethren in Christ, assisted in the ordination of Francis Asbury to the superintendency of American Methodist work.


In the Evangelical United Brethren ...

lebanonmemorialumc.org [cached]

In the Evangelical United Brethren heritage, for example, Philip William Otterbein, the principal founder of the United Brethren in Christ, assisted in the ordination of Francis Asbury to the superintendency of American Methodist work.


In the Evangelical United Brethren ...

www.hopelandumc.org:80 [cached]

In the Evangelical United Brethren heritage, for example, Philip William Otterbein, the principal founder of the United Brethren in Christ, assisted in the ordination of Francis Asbury to the superintendency of American Methodist work.

...
The first was founded by Philip William Otterbein (1726-1813) and Martin Boehm (1725-1812).
...
Otterbein, a German Reformed pastor, and Boehm, a Mennonite, preached an evangelical message and experience similar to the Methodists.
...
By the time of Asbury's death in March, 1816, Otterbein, Boehm, and Albright had also died.

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