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Wrong Philip Cornwel-Smith?

Philip Cornwel-Smith

Founding Editor

Bangkok's Metro Magazine

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Employment History

Ultimate Library


Web References(85 Total References)


Utopia Awards 2001 for Gay and Lesbian Pioneers in Asia

www.utopia-asia.com [cached]

Philip Cornwel-Smith of Bangkok's Metro Magazine, with emcee Natayada.


www.verythai.com

Philip Cornwel-Smith text & photographs John Goss photographs
by Philip Cornwel-Smith Alex Face describing his graffiti with film director Kongdej Jaturanrasmee and Dudesweet party organiser Pongsuang 'Note' Kunprasop, moderated by Philip Cornwel-Smith On Feb 14 at 1-2pm, Very Thai author Philip Cornwel-Smith will host one of the panel discussions, 'Where is Bangkok's Leading Edge', with three Thai figures who are moving the culture forward. the talk will be at the Rachini School venue in the Tha Tien festival enclave. Philip will look at how Thai trends emerge, become hip and then get accepted into the mainstream. Among all the talks and events, look out for Very Thai author Philip Cornwel-Smith, who will head a panel on the 'leading edge' of Bangkok's popular culture on Sunday Feb 14 at 1-pm. The podcast is an interview with author Philip Cornwel-Smith by journalist Trevor Ranges and Scott Coates, who was co-founder of the bespoke travel agency Smiling Albino. Philip gave a talk to the bloggers about the famous Hindu shrines located around the Ratchaprasong Intersection where Gaysorn is located. The bloggers later visited the shrines, now with some background knowledge to understand the dynamics of the shrines, which are an internationally-famous draw for tourists, especially Asians. Philip will give further talks as part of the TBEX Asia conference. Its impact on film, music, fashion, media and the arts have been tracked throughout by writer/editor Philip Cornwel-Smith, in Bangkok Metro Magazine, Time Out Bangkok guidebook and his book Very Thai: Everyday Popular Culture. The 'From T-Pop to Indy' chapter from Very Thai was reproduced in a book by MTV about Cool Asia; the chapter's revision in Very Thai's 2nd edition shows how indy has changed over time. In this talk, Philip addresses the status of Thai indy as a cultural movement, and questions whether it has declined or matured. Philip Cornwel-Smith will speak at the Creative Bangkok international symposium on October 15. His talk will look at how streetlife, everyday pop and even some cultural taboos have gone mainstream and even become regarded as heritage. The Creative Bangkok event runs Oct 12-17 with 50 talks, 10 workshops, 6 creative team challenges, and related events. Philip will speak on Oct 15, the day focusing on Creativity in Tourism and Heritage. Philip Cornwel-Smith will give a talk on July 1 at Thammasat University to the students of its to the International Programme. Very Thai is one of their set texts. The talk will be a variation on the phases of Thai popular culture that Philip has witnessed during the past two decades in Bangkok. Bangkok's oldest Rotary Club hosted a talk by Philip Cornwel-Smith called 'Very Thai Thai: How Pop Became Culture'. A twenty-year veteran of Thailand, Philip Cornwel-Smith recently released the second edition of Very Thai, a celebration of Thai pop, retro, street and folk culture. The re-release covers the many cultural changes that have swept through Thailand since the first book hit store shelves to considerable success nearly a decade ago. Through vivid photographs, sharply rendered illustrations and insightful observations, the author pinpoints some of the biggest changes he's witnessed over the years. One of the most dramatic changes, Cornwel-Smith notes, is the way politics has come to infuse daily life in Thailand, from fashion to soap operas. The new edition features more than 200 striking images and four original chapters, including a fascinating exploration of the rise and global popularity of the retro 'Thai Thai' culture. "Magical tattoos, herbal whisky, Morlam folk music and street food have evolved from low-status taboo into mainstream trends with export appeal," the author says. What's more, Cornwel-Smith notes, is that Thai pop culture itself, long dismissed by traditionalists as urban trivia, has acquired social legitimacy and is regularly celebrated int eh media, at museums and at galleries in Thailand and elsewhere. Philip Cornwel-Smith holds anniversary party in [Space] Bangkok On 21 March 1994, Philip started a new job, with a new visa and a new home - and a new life. Exactly 2 decades after his first day as founding editor of Bangkok Metro magazine, he marked the occasion with a reunion party of friends. And colleagues from throughout the Intervening years. He chose Space as the venue because the journalist-run volunteer event space has the kind of impromptu bohemian bars for which Bangkok was famous back in the 1990s. It overlooks the river from the floor above a 7/11 in Khlongsan Market. What could be more Thai Thai? Among the Space volunteers, Nym, Yvan and Scott helped manage the party, while Craig Knowles acted as a cheeky MC by delivering messages from absent friends, which ran to many pages and with plenty of rubbing and roasting of Philip. Philip said a few words to thank all those present, and the many friends and colleagues who couldn't be there. Philip Cornwel-Smith will give a talk on 6 March 2014 at The National Museum for the National Museum Volunteers' postponed Lecture Series. The talk was about the phases of Thai popular culture that Philip has witnessed during the past two decades in Bangkok. Presenter/producer Basil Gelpke interviewed Philip Cornwel-Smith about the state of Bangkok and its popular culture during the height of the 'Bangkok Shutdown' protests. Author Philip Cornwel-Smith to be dubbed into German Among the people from different walks of life featured in the show, Gelpke and his Malaysian and Croatian crew interviewed Philip Cornwel-Smith on 1 February 2014, at his home, and in the Samsen area of old Bangkok. The updated and extended second edition of Philip Cornwel-Smith's popular and influential 2004 original is just as much a must-have resource, thanks to his encyclopaedic knowledge and charming explanations about all the sights and experiences you encounter in Thailand. Again, it's replete with hundreds of great photos by John Goss, Cornwel-Smith and others. But clearly it was badly in need of updating, Cornwel-Smith writes. Cornwel-Smith displays a keen if subtle passion for the country's politics, at least in the way it affects popular culture. By Philip Cornwel-Smith and John Goss "Very Thai by Philip Cornwel-Smith is an excellent that helps to orientate the reader to everyday popular Thai culture; it is an insightful and intriguing read" 'Philip Cornwel-Smith is writing in a way that I like, with an electric eye for the streets. Sixty four more pages, for starters, says its author, long-time resident and cultural historian Philip Cornwel-Smith. "We wanted to increase the type font and the size, which was always a bit small," he says speaking to us at Bangkok 101 HQ. Why? Because even they, Cornwel-Smith explains, have their usefulness, offer us a conduit, a prism through which modernisation and social change can be viewed. For example, the chapter on pleng phua chiwit (Songs for Life), a socially-consciousfolk-music movement that now seems littlemore than a quaint reminder of the deeplypoliticised and bloody seventies, has beenkept in. "Now it's a vehicle for talking aboutpolitical changes over the past seven years,"he says, "as like much of the country themovement got split between the red and theyellow shirts." For other topics, the only thing that has really changed is their social context. "Thai tattoos, for example, used to be something that was looked down on and a bit improper," he says. "But it's been ungraded in the public perception… nowadays every second celebrity has a haa taew tattoo on her shoulder and the pronouncements are about foreigners who don't understand traditional Thai heritage getting them." Changes in public perceptions of the motorcycle taxi driver are another phenomenon he singles out ("they have become a bit like the tuk-tuk - cultural emblems, safe for public consumption"). So, too, is Thailand's beach culture, which has changed so radically that he now sees the chapter on it as a "barometer of social change". Then I found Very Thai: Everyday Popular Culture, by Philip Cornwel-Smith. To get all the lastest news about Very Bangkok and Very Thai, follow Philip on Facebook at VeryThaiBook or on twitter @verybangkok, or bookmark his website: Very Thai. Philip has a passion for hunting down the tiny details of the popular culture and history of Thailand and it shows in the book. One of the best books about Thai culture and life, Very Thai by Philip Cornwel-Smith, now has a photo exhibition in front of ZEN in Bangkok. The exhibition runs from now until 6th December 2012. A book written by Philip Cornwel-Smith and


www.verythai.com

Philip Cornwel-Smith text & photographs John Goss photographs
The text is well written by Cornwel-Smith who has lived in Thailand for several years, writing and editing for over a decade. He started as editor of Bangkok Metro magazine. As the publicity blurb states, eight years of press conference buffets later, he moved on to edit Time Out Bangkok Guide. He also has several international writing and editorial credits under his belt. © Copyright Philip Cornwel-Smith


News & Events Detail

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Philip Cornwel-Smith is the author of Very Thai: Everyday Popular Culture, and writer-editor of the Time Out Bangkok guidebook.
Born in England and based in Bangkok since 1994, he was founding editor of Bangkok Metro Magazine, contributes to international publications and is currently writing Very Bangkok, a book about the city's neighbourhoods, networks and social scenes.


ISAN FOOD & WINE MASTERCLASS: PRESENTERS

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PHILIP CORNWEL-SMITH
Philip is the author of bestselling Very Thai: Everyday Popular Culture, and editor of Time Out Bangkok. An English expat based in Bangkok for nearly 20 years, he writes for both domestic and international publications, plus lectures widely. He was founding editor of Bangkok Metro Magazine.


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