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Wrong Philip Hestand?

Philip A. Hestand

Counseling Center Director

Arkansas State University

HQ Phone:  (870) 972-2100

Direct Phone: (870) ***-****direct phone

Email: p***@***.edu

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Arkansas State University

2105 Aggie Rd.

Jonesboro, Arkansas,72467

United States

Company Description

Arkansas State University enjoys a reputation as a quality regional institution of higher education, and is recognized for offering special services to the people of the Arkansas Delta. Dedicated to teaching, research, and service, the university provides stud... more.

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Web References(24 Total References)


www.jonesborosun.com

When talking crime among youth, Dr. Phil Hestand, director of Arkansas State University's Counseling Services, said they are typically talking about the average kid; there will always be a few who are committing the crime because they are more impulsive or from problems stemming from abuse or neglect.
Another problem is if the person does not want the help, Hestand and Davis said. Hestand said people are complicated, which means there is not an easy fix to stop crimes committed by children.


aggressionmanagement.com [cached]

Dr. Philip Hestand, Director of Counseling and Career Planning, Arkansas State University


www.nse.org [cached]

Dr. Phil Hestand
Career Services Center Arkansas State University P. O. Box 2490 State University, AR 72467-2490 (870) 972-3025 phestand@astate.edu Dr. Phil Hestand Career Services Center Arkansas State University P. O. Box 2490 State University, AR 72467-2490 (870) 972-3025 phestand@astate.edu


www.armstrongandassociates.org [cached]

Dr. Philip Hestand, Director of Counseling and Career Planning, Arkansas State University, Ak.


www.jonesborosun.com

Dr. Phil Hestand, director of counseling at Arkansas State University, said Friday that there are a number of places to find statistics on false rape allegations."There are lots of figures about how high incidents of this kind of thing is," he said."Therapists who work with them say 2 percent."Some police departments report 30 percent, and the FBI says 8 percent, he added."It's a low number of cases of assaults reported," Hestand said.But people should not have the idea that the validity of all reports of sexual assault should be questioned, he stressed.Filing a report with the police and all the things that go along with it are difficult things to do because of fear, embarrassment and victims blaming themselves, Hestand explained.A high percentage of sexual assaults -- including rape -- are never reported, he added.A small number of people who make false claims to police have delusional disorders.They might truly believe they have been assaulted, but they might think the pope or the president assaulted them, Hestand explained.Schizophrenics would fall into this category.Pathological lying is another reason people make false sexual assault claims, he said.People in this category lie to police for a specific purpose, such as revenge or financial gain.For example, a woman might blame a sexual assault on a professional athlete in an effort to get money."Those are usually easy to see through," Hestand said.They are seeking nurturing, attention, sympathy or kindness, Hestand said.A person with facticious disorder will not have anxiety or be depressed, he said.Lots of people with the disorder move from doctor to doctor, hospital to hospital or even city to city repeatedly making allegations.Another name for facticious disorder is Munchausen's, he said.Some people who have facticious disorder also have a personality disorder -- maybe a borderline personality disorder, Hestand said.And they sometimes inflict damage, cutting and bruising themselves, tying or taping themselves to a chair or ransacking their home in an attempt to make it look as if someone else was suspect.But Hestand maintained that the majority of reports filed with law enforcement agencies are genuine.When true reports are filed and appropriate action is taken, it might encourage other victims to contact authorities, Hestand noted.And Hestand said the important thing for people who have been assaulted is to report it, but that doesn't always happen."Lots don't report it," Hestand said.


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