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2008-10-25T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Phil Driscoll?

Rev. Phil Driscoll

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Background Information

Employment History

Phillips Craig & Dean

Life House Church

Ordained Minister

Baylor University

Trumpet Player and Teacher

The Freedom Center

Musician, Trumpet

Tulsamusic.com

Affiliations

Member
The Spurrlows

Founder
Mighty Horn Ministries

Founder
PHIL DRISCOLL 5046

Education

Baylor University

Web References (193 Total References)


MightyHorn Ministries

mightyhorn.com [cached]

Phil Driscoll, a 15-year-old Central High School trumpet player, won the Tulsa State Fair Talent Show contest Friday night, adding $500 to the large semifinalist trophy he won the night before.

Driscoll competed with 35 acts, selected as best from 294 which appeared in nine performances during the fair.
Driscoll, the first place winner, is first chair trumpeter in the recently organized Tulsa Philharmonic Youth Symphony, and has won solo prizes in various competitions. He has been playing about five years, and was in the band at Bell Junior High School.
...
Central's whirlwind trumpeter, Phil Driscoll, tooted his name up the ladder of fame at a 12-state musical contest sponsored by Youth For Christ this summer. Wowing spectators, judges, and fellow contestants, Phil captured the first prize award in the brass division, after a grueling test of elimination.
Compounding this tremendous feat is the fact that he had done exactly the same thing twice before. Discounting one of the performances, since it was in duet, this was the first time anyone had ever won first prize more than once.
On July 2, having overcome numerous city, district, and state opponents, Phil was sent to Burlington, Iowa for the semifinals. Coming out on top in his division, Phil and the second place winner journeyed to Winona Lake, Indiana to play in the finals. It didn't take long to eliminate the three others. The judges were not the only ones who liked Phil. The victorious musician was plied with 42 scholarships from, he said, "Oh, shucks, I don't know who all."
The contest was concluded by July 15, and immediately after, Phil, along with seven others, went on a musical tour of the Great Lakes region. This was sponsored by Voice for Christian Youth, and included appearances at the Blue Water Festival in Michigan, a steamship cruise through the Great Lakes, and numerous concerts along the beaches. Claimed Phil, "It was just fantastic."
Phil arrived home Aug. 3, triumphant, but tired, and not quite certain if he were ready for another school year at Central.
"Tulsan National Champ In YFC Trumpet Contest"
When it comes to the trumpet, Phil Driscoll doesn't have to toot his own horn, everybody else is doing it for him. Competing against juniors and seniors from high school throughout the United States and Canada, Phil, this week, won the national championship in the Youth for Christ instrumental musicians' competition for his work on the trumpet. Phil will be a 10th grader this fall at Will Rogers High School.
Winning music contests is not new to him. As a junior high school, he competed against students in the 7th through 12th grades in the annual Music Educators' competition and was given a "superior plus" rating in Tulsa, the district, state, and tri-state contests.
He also won the Elks Club contest for instrumental musicians and a $100 war bond.
A number of scholarship possibilities were attached to his YFC championship. Phil hasn't decided which he will accept, but he has made up his mind to become a professional trumpet player.
Young Driscoll, the son of Rev. and Mrs. James A. Driscoll, 3212 E. 4th St., "sort of stumbled into" playing the trumpet when he found as old instrument his father had formerly played and "decided he would learn."
He began taking lessons in school when he was a fifth grade student at Lancaster, near Dallas, Texas. His family moved to Tulsa in 1959 and he studied trumpet in the regular classes at Bell Junior High School and as a private student of Roger Fenn.
Phil also plays the Hawaiian steel guitar, and was able to play this instrument before he could read. "I heard one in church," he recalls, "and I thought the sound was so pretty I decided I was going to learn to play one." This was before Phil entered school.
He plays both the guitar and the trumpet at the Community Four Square Gospel Church, 1130 S. 119th East Ave., where his father is pastor. He accompanies the congregational song service and offers special numbers.
At Will Rogers, where he expects to major in Spanish and music, he will be in both the marching and concert bands. Phil also plays basketball and baseball.
Phil, who "had never heard of the Youth for Christ until a year ago," first was named YFC champion for Tulsa, then went on to place first in district and regional meets. As regional champion, he went to a 12-state meet at Omaha, where he won first prize, a gold cup and the opportunity to compete in the national contest.
...
Phil Driscoll, 18, of 1127 S. Birmingham Place, member of The Spurrlows, 30-piece orchestra and glee club traveling U.S. high schools on behalf of Chrysler Corporation's driver education program, will return to Oklahoma next week when the troupe presents its driver education production "Music for Modern Americans" to local high school students.
The Spurrlows, on a national tour which will take them over 60,000 miles this school year via station wagons, a 40-foot truck and Dodge Charger automobiles, will perform for teenagers in 25 states.
Phil, who played first trumpet with the Tulsa Youth Symphony, recently returned from Europe where he attended the World Music contest in Holland. He joined the Spurrlows this year.
...
On stage are Phil Driscoll and his trumpet. He sets his feet, sways his body back and raises the horn to his lips in a single, liquid motion. In the following moments, he and his trumpet become one wailing instrument of sound -- a sound that is commanding, simple and alive.Driscoll would be glad to know that his audiences usually consider his style unique. "I can't compare myself to anyone else. I try to sound as different as possible," he said.Driscoll was speaking after a band rehearsal, and musicians were trailing down the hall to an accompaniment of assorted instrumental squeaks and squawks. The easygoing , blonde freshman seemed right at home in such an atmosphere. Naturally, he has been in one band or another since "oh, I don't know, about the sixth grade, I guess."Driscoll didn't "catch on" to his talent until he began playing in the Tulsa, OK Youth Symphony. He hasn't stopped piling up honors since. In the ninth grade, Driscoll entered an international trumpet contest and won. Then he proceeded to win it for the next three years. "That means the most to me. I consider that my greatest feat," he said. Since high school, Driscoll has toured with two big bands. He left school last spring to tour with one, a Chrysler Corp. sponsored band.
...
Although Driscoll agrees that jazz hasn't been met with a good reception at Baylor so far, he thinks that "religious reasons might be one of the big problems.
...
Phil Driscoll doesn't just play the trumpet -- he lives it. The sound that comes from his silver horn is not just music, it's his thoughts, his dreams and his ambitions. I never play a solo the same way twice," Driscoll said, "I play it the way I feel and improvise as I go. That's what I like about it -- that's the challenge -- to make up my own arrangement as I play."Driscoll said his style probably came from playing on Sunday mornings, Sunday nights and Wednesday nights in his father's churches."I finally got tired of playing the melody of the same hymns over and over," he said, "so I started to improvise and I believe that helped me more than anything to develop my style.Driscoll plays in the symphony.""But it's a real sweat," he said, "because I know I have to hit the right note at the right time or that's it. When I play alone I never have to worry."Driscoll doesn't practice."I've never practiced much," he said. "I guess playing the trumpet for me is a God-given talent."
Besides that, he doesn't have the time and doesn't like to practice."I can't see myself cooped up in one of those little square practice rooms at Baylor and blowing at the four walls," he said.Driscoll likes to get up in front of an audience and blow. With his studies (he is carrying 16 hours at Baylor) and his weekend engagements it doesn't leave much time for practice. Driscoll is out of town almost every weekend playing generally for youth-oriented religious meetings. And he likes to stay in the religious field -- most of the time. About 75 per cent of what I do is in the religious field."I think that since my talent is God-given, I can do better in that field," Driscoll said. And his first album which has just been released by Word Records of Waco is made up of Driscoll calls "contemporary religious music."The album, entitled "A Touch of Trumpet" was recorded in Stockholm, Sweden, with the Stockholm Symphony Orchestra. It includes such old-time favorites as "When the Roll Is Called Up Yonder," "Sound of the Battle Cry," "When the Saints Go Marching In


MightyHorn Ministries

www.phildriscoll.com [cached]

Phil Driscoll, a 15-year-old Central High School trumpet player, won the Tulsa State Fair Talent Show contest Friday night, adding $500 to the large semifinalist trophy he won the night before.

Driscoll competed with 35 acts, selected as best from 294 which appeared in nine performances during the fair.
Driscoll, the first place winner, is first chair trumpeter in the recently organized Tulsa Philharmonic Youth Symphony, and has won solo prizes in various competitions.He has been playing about five years, and was in the band at Bell Junior High School.
...
Central's whirlwind trumpeter, Phil Driscoll, tooted his name up the ladder of fame at a 12-state musical contest sponsored by Youth For Christ this summer.Wowing spectators, judges, and fellow contestants, Phil captured the first prize award in the brass division, after a grueling test of elimination.
Compounding this tremendous feat is the fact that he had done exactly the same thing twice before.Discounting one of the performances, since it was in duet, this was the first time anyone had ever won first prize more than once.
On July 2, having overcome numerous city, district, and state opponents, Phil was sent to Burlington, Iowa for the semifinals.Coming out on top in his division, Phil and the second place winner journeyed to Winona Lake, Indiana to play in the finals.It didn't take long to eliminate the three others.The judges were not the only ones who liked Phil.The victorious musician was plied with 42 scholarships from, he said, "Oh, shucks, I don't know who all."
The contest was concluded by July 15, and immediately after, Phil, along with seven others, went on a musical tour of the Great Lakes region.This was sponsored by Voice for Christian Youth, and included appearances at the Blue Water Festival in Michigan, a steamship cruise through the Great Lakes, and numerous concerts along the beaches.Claimed Phil, "It was just fantastic."
Phil arrived home Aug. 3, triumphant, but tired, and not quite certain if he were ready for another school year at Central.
"Tulsan National Champ In YFC Trumpet Contest"
When it comes to the trumpet, Phil Driscoll doesn't have to toot his own horn, everybody else is doing it for him.Competing against juniors and seniors from high school throughout the United States and Canada, Phil, this week, won the national championship in the Youth for Christ instrumental musicians' competition for his work on the trumpet.Phil will be a 10th grader this fall at Will Rogers High School.
Winning music contests is not new to him.As a junior high school, he competed against students in the 7th through 12th grades in the annual Music Educators' competition and was given a "superior plus" rating in Tulsa, the district, state, and tri-state contests.
He also won the Elks Club contest for instrumental musicians and a $100 war bond.
A number of scholarship possibilities were attached to his YFC championship.Phil hasn't decided which he will accept, but he has made up his mind to become a professional trumpet player.
Young Driscoll, the son of Rev. and Mrs. James A. Driscoll, 3212 E. 4th St., "sort of stumbled into" playing the trumpet when he found as old instrument his father had formerly played and "decided he would learn."
He began taking lessons in school when he was a fifth grade student at Lancaster, near Dallas, Texas.His family moved to Tulsa in 1959 and he studied trumpet in the regular classes at Bell Junior High School and as a private student of Roger Fenn.
Phil also plays the Hawaiian steel guitar, and was able to play this instrument before he could read."I heard one in church," he recalls, "and I thought the sound was so pretty I decided I was going to learn to play one."This was before Phil entered school.
He plays both the guitar and the trumpet at the Community Four Square Gospel Church, 1130 S. 119th East Ave., where his father is pastor.He accompanies the congregational song service and offers special numbers.
At Will Rogers, where he expects to major in Spanish and music, he will be in both the marching and concert bands.Phil also plays basketball and baseball.
Phil, who "had never heard of the Youth for Christ until a year ago," first was named YFC champion for Tulsa, then went on to place first in district and regional meets.As regional champion, he went to a 12-state meet at Omaha, where he won first prize, a gold cup and the opportunity to compete in the national contest.
...
Phil Driscoll, 18, of 1127 S. Birmingham Place, member of The Spurrlows, 30-piece orchestra and glee club traveling U.S. high schools on behalf of Chrysler Corporation's driver education program, will return to Oklahoma next week when the troupe presents its driver education production "Music for Modern Americans" to local high school students.
The Spurrlows, on a national tour which will take them over 60,000 miles this school year via station wagons, a 40-foot truck and Dodge Charger automobiles, will perform for teenagers in 25 states.
Phil, who played first trumpet with the Tulsa Youth Symphony, recently returned from Europe where he attended the World Music contest in Holland.He joined the Spurrlows this year.
...
On stage are Phil Driscoll and his trumpet.He sets his feet, sways his body back and raises the horn to his lips in a single, liquid motion.In the following moments, he and his trumpet become one wailing instrument of sound -- a sound that is commanding, simple and alive.Driscoll would be glad to know that his audiences usually consider his style unique."I can't compare myself to anyone else.I try to sound as different as possible," he said.Driscoll was speaking after a band rehearsal, and musicians were trailing down the hall to an accompaniment of assorted instrumental squeaks and squawks.The easygoing , blonde freshman seemed right at home in such an atmosphere.Naturally, he has been in one band or another since "oh, I don't know, about the sixth grade, I guess."Driscoll didn't "catch on" to his talent until he began playing in the Tulsa, OK Youth Symphony.He hasn't stopped piling up honors since.In the ninth grade, Driscoll entered an international trumpet contest and won.Then he proceeded to win it for the next three years."That means the most to me.I consider that my greatest feat," he said.Since high school, Driscoll has toured with two big bands.He left school last spring to tour with one, a Chrysler Corp. sponsored band.
...
Although Driscoll agrees that jazz hasn't been met with a good reception at Baylor so far, he thinks that "religious reasons might be one of the big problems.
...
Phil Driscoll doesn't just play the trumpet -- he lives it.The sound that comes from his silver horn is not just music, it's his thoughts, his dreams and his ambitions.I never play a solo the same way twice," Driscoll said, "I play it the way I feel and improvise as I go.That's what I like about it -- that's the challenge -- to make up my own arrangement as I play."Driscoll said his style probably came from playing on Sunday mornings, Sunday nights and Wednesday nights in his father's churches."I finally got tired of playing the melody of the same hymns over and over," he said, "so I started to improvise and I believe that helped me more than anything to develop my style.Driscoll plays in the symphony.""But it's a real sweat," he said, "because I know I have to hit the right note at the right time or that's it.When I play alone I never have to worry."Driscoll doesn't practice."I've never practiced much," he said."I guess playing the trumpet for me is a God-given talent."
Besides that, he doesn't have the time and doesn't like to practice."I can't see myself cooped up in one of those little square practice rooms at Baylor and blowing at the four walls," he said.Driscoll likes to get up in front of an audience and blow.With his studies (he is carrying 16 hours at Baylor) and his weekend engagements it doesn't leave much time for practice.Driscoll is out of town almost every weekend playing generally for youth-oriented religious meetings.And he likes to stay in the religious field -- most of the time.About 75 per cent of what I do is in the religious field."I think that since my talent is God-given, I can do better in that field," Driscoll said.And his first album which has just been released by Word Records of Waco is made up of Driscoll calls "contemporary religious music."The album, entitled "A Touch of Trumpet" was recorded in Stockholm, Sweden, with the Stockholm Symphony Orchestra.It includes such old-time favorites as "When the Roll Is Called Up Yonder," "Sound of the Battle Cry," "When the Saints Go Marching In


MightyHorn Ministries

www.mightyhorn.com [cached]

Phil Driscoll, a 15-year-old Central High School trumpet player, won the Tulsa State Fair Talent Show contest Friday night, adding $500 to the large semifinalist trophy he won the night before.

Driscoll competed with 35 acts, selected as best from 294 which appeared in nine performances during the fair.
Driscoll, the first place winner, is first chair trumpeter in the recently organized Tulsa Philharmonic Youth Symphony, and has won solo prizes in various competitions. He has been playing about five years, and was in the band at Bell Junior High School.
...
Central's whirlwind trumpeter, Phil Driscoll, tooted his name up the ladder of fame at a 12-state musical contest sponsored by Youth For Christ this summer. Wowing spectators, judges, and fellow contestants, Phil captured the first prize award in the brass division, after a grueling test of elimination.
Compounding this tremendous feat is the fact that he had done exactly the same thing twice before. Discounting one of the performances, since it was in duet, this was the first time anyone had ever won first prize more than once.
On July 2, having overcome numerous city, district, and state opponents, Phil was sent to Burlington, Iowa for the semifinals. Coming out on top in his division, Phil and the second place winner journeyed to Winona Lake, Indiana to play in the finals. It didn't take long to eliminate the three others. The judges were not the only ones who liked Phil. The victorious musician was plied with 42 scholarships from, he said, "Oh, shucks, I don't know who all."
The contest was concluded by July 15, and immediately after, Phil, along with seven others, went on a musical tour of the Great Lakes region. This was sponsored by Voice for Christian Youth, and included appearances at the Blue Water Festival in Michigan, a steamship cruise through the Great Lakes, and numerous concerts along the beaches. Claimed Phil, "It was just fantastic."
Phil arrived home Aug. 3, triumphant, but tired, and not quite certain if he were ready for another school year at Central.
"Tulsan National Champ In YFC Trumpet Contest"
When it comes to the trumpet, Phil Driscoll doesn't have to toot his own horn, everybody else is doing it for him. Competing against juniors and seniors from high school throughout the United States and Canada, Phil, this week, won the national championship in the Youth for Christ instrumental musicians' competition for his work on the trumpet. Phil will be a 10th grader this fall at Will Rogers High School.
Winning music contests is not new to him. As a junior high school, he competed against students in the 7th through 12th grades in the annual Music Educators' competition and was given a "superior plus" rating in Tulsa, the district, state, and tri-state contests.
He also won the Elks Club contest for instrumental musicians and a $100 war bond.
A number of scholarship possibilities were attached to his YFC championship. Phil hasn't decided which he will accept, but he has made up his mind to become a professional trumpet player.
Young Driscoll, the son of Rev. and Mrs. James A. Driscoll, 3212 E. 4th St., "sort of stumbled into" playing the trumpet when he found as old instrument his father had formerly played and "decided he would learn."
He began taking lessons in school when he was a fifth grade student at Lancaster, near Dallas, Texas. His family moved to Tulsa in 1959 and he studied trumpet in the regular classes at Bell Junior High School and as a private student of Roger Fenn.
Phil also plays the Hawaiian steel guitar, and was able to play this instrument before he could read. "I heard one in church," he recalls, "and I thought the sound was so pretty I decided I was going to learn to play one." This was before Phil entered school.
He plays both the guitar and the trumpet at the Community Four Square Gospel Church, 1130 S. 119th East Ave., where his father is pastor. He accompanies the congregational song service and offers special numbers.
At Will Rogers, where he expects to major in Spanish and music, he will be in both the marching and concert bands. Phil also plays basketball and baseball.
Phil, who "had never heard of the Youth for Christ until a year ago," first was named YFC champion for Tulsa, then went on to place first in district and regional meets. As regional champion, he went to a 12-state meet at Omaha, where he won first prize, a gold cup and the opportunity to compete in the national contest.
...
Phil Driscoll, 18, of 1127 S. Birmingham Place, member of The Spurrlows, 30-piece orchestra and glee club traveling U.S. high schools on behalf of Chrysler Corporation's driver education program, will return to Oklahoma next week when the troupe presents its driver education production "Music for Modern Americans" to local high school students.
The Spurrlows, on a national tour which will take them over 60,000 miles this school year via station wagons, a 40-foot truck and Dodge Charger automobiles, will perform for teenagers in 25 states.
Phil, who played first trumpet with the Tulsa Youth Symphony, recently returned from Europe where he attended the World Music contest in Holland. He joined the Spurrlows this year.
...
On stage are Phil Driscoll and his trumpet. He sets his feet, sways his body back and raises the horn to his lips in a single, liquid motion. In the following moments, he and his trumpet become one wailing instrument of sound -- a sound that is commanding, simple and alive.Driscoll would be glad to know that his audiences usually consider his style unique. "I can't compare myself to anyone else. I try to sound as different as possible," he said.Driscoll was speaking after a band rehearsal, and musicians were trailing down the hall to an accompaniment of assorted instrumental squeaks and squawks. The easygoing , blonde freshman seemed right at home in such an atmosphere. Naturally, he has been in one band or another since "oh, I don't know, about the sixth grade, I guess."Driscoll didn't "catch on" to his talent until he began playing in the Tulsa, OK Youth Symphony. He hasn't stopped piling up honors since. In the ninth grade, Driscoll entered an international trumpet contest and won. Then he proceeded to win it for the next three years. "That means the most to me. I consider that my greatest feat," he said. Since high school, Driscoll has toured with two big bands. He left school last spring to tour with one, a Chrysler Corp. sponsored band.
...
Although Driscoll agrees that jazz hasn't been met with a good reception at Baylor so far, he thinks that "religious reasons might be one of the big problems.
...
Phil Driscoll doesn't just play the trumpet -- he lives it. The sound that comes from his silver horn is not just music, it's his thoughts, his dreams and his ambitions. I never play a solo the same way twice," Driscoll said, "I play it the way I feel and improvise as I go. That's what I like about it -- that's the challenge -- to make up my own arrangement as I play."Driscoll said his style probably came from playing on Sunday mornings, Sunday nights and Wednesday nights in his father's churches."I finally got tired of playing the melody of the same hymns over and over," he said, "so I started to improvise and I believe that helped me more than anything to develop my style.Driscoll plays in the symphony.""But it's a real sweat," he said, "because I know I have to hit the right note at the right time or that's it. When I play alone I never have to worry."Driscoll doesn't practice."I've never practiced much," he said. "I guess playing the trumpet for me is a God-given talent."
Besides that, he doesn't have the time and doesn't like to practice."I can't see myself cooped up in one of those little square practice rooms at Baylor and blowing at the four walls," he said.Driscoll likes to get up in front of an audience and blow. With his studies (he is carrying 16 hours at Baylor) and his weekend engagements it doesn't leave much time for practice. Driscoll is out of town almost every weekend playing generally for youth-oriented religious meetings. And he likes to stay in the religious field -- most of the time. About 75 per cent of what I do is in the religious field."I think that since my talent is God-given, I can do better in that field," Driscoll said. And his first album which has just been released by Word Records of Waco is made up of Driscoll calls "contemporary religious music."The album, entitled "A Touch of Trumpet" was recorded in Stockholm, Sweden, with the Stockholm Symphony Orchestra. It includes such old-time favorites as "When the Roll Is Called Up Yonder," "Sound of the Battle Cry," "When the Saints Go Marching In


enews/Parade of Stars e-NEWS - June 2006

www.paradeofstars.com [cached]

We reported the legal problems of trumpeter/singer Phil Driscoll a while back in our regular Parade issue.

...
As a youngster and a student at Baylor Univ., Phil won many awards for his trumpet playing.He began recording and touring with several pop acts in the 1970s including Joe Cocker, Stephen Stills, Blood Sweat & Tears and Leon Russell.Phil Driscoll is a strong Christian and an absolute master of the trumpet.The government's case was built around Phil's purchase of houses, etc., for his personal use and charging them off on his not-for-profit ministries.Phil has been a friend for many years and we hope he can come through this.He may become stronger because of it.Phil has been a friend for years.


Phil ...

phildriscoll.com [cached]

Phil Driscoll

...
Phil Driscoll founded Mighty Horn Ministries, a non-profit organization, in 1982. Since then he has travelled the world, bringing the Good News of the Gospel to those near and far and spreading the knowledge and revelation of the power of sound to affect your world.
Phil has been blessed to be able to take the message and the music to many prisons, churches, crusades, and numerous other mission fields across the globe.
Sow a seed today and help Phil continue to do all that God has called him to do--to touch and change lives and empower men and women of every age with revelation of the power of sound.

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