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This profile was last updated on 4/4/16  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. Peter S. Watson Jr.

Wrong Dr. Peter S. Watson Jr.?

Research Associate

Phone: +44 ***********  
University of Cambridge
Downing Street
Cambridge , Cambridgeshire CB2 3EH
United Kingdom

Company Description: The University of Cambridge is one of the oldest universities in the world, and one of the largest in the United Kingdom. It has a worldwide reputation for...   more
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Secretary Treasurer, Aviation Historian
    Mr Mervyn Prime
  • Intellectual Historian, Journalist and the Author
    The German Genius
  • Board Member
    Shaker Musuem
  • Assess Committee
    Assess Commitee

Education

  • PhD
179 Total References
Web References
paul mitchinson.com » Jumping Around in the Twentieth Century, Without Pop Music
paulmitchinson.com [cached]
A Terrible Beauty : The People and Ideas That Shaped the Modern Mind - A History, by Peter Watson
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Peter Watson's A Terrible Beauty is an early sign of the deluge to come. (We're not counting cheaters such as Sir Martin Gilbert, who published the first volume of his History of the Twentieth Century back in 1997.) Watson, a British journalist now working as a research associate at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research at the University of Cambridge, offers a peculiarly sunny view of the past century.
...
Peter Watson's A Terrible Beauty is an early sign of the deluge to come. (We're not counting cheaters such as Sir Martin Gilbert, who published the first volume of his History of the Twentieth Century back in 1997.) Watson, a British journalist now working as a research associate at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research at the University of Cambridge, offers a peculiarly sunny view of the past century.
...
In telling his tale of the "people and ideas that shaped the modern mind," Watson is working with a staggering cast of characters. Even had he restricted his account to scientists proper, Watson would have set himself a daunting task. But he goes much, much further, sketching the lives of artists and theologians, composers and civil rights activists. "Great works of religion, literature, music, painting, and sculpture fit into this narrative," he writes, since "all cultures have been attempts to come to terms with both the natural and the supernatural world, to create beauty, produce knowledge and get at the truth.
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But to his credit, Watson does not shy away from offences committed, however fraudulently, in science's name. Two of the book's Big Ideas - genetic inheritance and Darwinian evolution - have together sired countless bastard offspring, odious pseudo-scientific theories about racial hierarchies and eugenics.
Does Watson miss anything? Inevitably. But he heads off any criticism by declaring flatly that his book is not intended to be "a definitive intellectual history of the twentieth century - who would dare attempt to create such an entity?
...
Watson faults modern art for its "obsession with novelty for its own sake," and for speaking "with less and less confidence" as the century progressed. But perhaps it is Watson's lack of confidence that is the real issue. His discussion of music is particularly derivative and unassured. He ends with serialism and aleatory music in the 1950s, with barely a passing nod to pop music, and nary a whisper about anything else.
...
Watson, meanwhile, has created an exquisite mess. His book jumps from story to story, with only the briefest nod to narrative coherence. In a characteristic transitional device, Watson writes that "T.S. Eliot, James Joyce and Adolf Hitler, so different in many ways, had one thing in common - a love of the classical world. He says that the painter Gustav Klimt was, "like [philosopher Otto] Weininger, the son of a goldsmith. But there the similarity ended. On literature, he tells us that "the form of Joyce's Ulysses could not be more different from The Waste Land or Virginia Woolf's Jacob's Room," then adds, "But there are similarities.
Dr Rebecca Jacob. CLAHRC Fellow 2012 | Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care Cambridgeshire and Peterborough
clahrc-cp.nihr.ac.uk [cached]
Dr Peter Watson, Senior Statistician, MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, University of Cambridge
BMJ Open - Editorial Board
bmjopen.bmj.com [cached]
Peter Watson University of Cambridge
Robin Straus Agency | Authors
www.robinstrausagency.com [cached]
Peter Watson Robin Straus Agency | Authors Robin Straus Agency
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Peter Watson
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Peter Watson
Peter Watson has written for the New York Times, the London Sunday Times, Observer, and the Spectator. In June 1997, he was appointed Research Associate at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research at the University of Cambridge. He is the author of fourteen books including Ideas, The Modern Mind, The Caravaggio Conspiracy, From Manet to Manhattan, Sotheby's: The Inside Story, The Medici Conspiracy, The German Genius and most recently, The Great Divide: Nature and Human Nature in the Old World and the New.
News
Peter Watson's The Great Divide: Nature and Human Nature in the Old World and the New is now available.
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Peter Watson's hugely ambitious and stimulating history of ideas from deep antiquity to the present day-from the invention of writing, mathematics, science, and philosophy to the rise of such concepts as the law, sacrifice, democracy, and the soul-offers an illuminated path to a greater understanding of our world and ourselves.
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Peter Watson, a former investigative journalist for the London Sunday Times and author of two previous exposés of art world scandals, names the key figures in this network that has depleted Europe's classical artifacts.
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In this absorbing cultural history, Peter Watson goes back through time to explore the origins of the German genius, how it flourished, and how it continues to shape our world. As he convincingly demonstrates, while we may hold other European cultures in higher esteem, it was German thinking--from Bach to Nietzsche to Freud--that actually shaped modern America and Britain in ways that resonate today.
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In this fascinating and erudite history, Peter Watson ponders these questions central to the human story. By 15,000 BC, humans had migrated from northeastern Asia across the frozen Bering land bridge to the Americas.
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Watson identifies three major differences between the two worlds - climate, domesticable mammals, and hallucinogenic plants - that combined to produce very different trajectories of civilization in the two hemispheres.
People | Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit
www.mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk [cached]
Peter Watson
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