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Wrong Peter Milner?

Peter M. Milner

Dorothy J. Killam Professor

Montreal Neurological Institute

HQ Phone:  (514) 398-1931

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Montreal Neurological Institute

3801 University Street

Montreal, Quebec,H3A 2B4

Canada

Company Description

October 2009 marks the 75th anniversary of the MNI. The MNI is a McGill University research and teaching institute, dedicated to the study of the nervous system and neurological diseases. Founded in 1934 by the renowned Dr. Wilder Penfield, the MNI is one of t...more

Background Information

Employment History

Graduate Student

Hebb


Affiliations

McGill University

Professor Emeritus


Education

PhD

physiological psychology


Web References(28 Total References)


The Frontal Lobes Supercharge - Neil Slade's Amazing Brain Music Adventure

www.neilslade.com [cached]

The location of pre-existing neural circuits for intense pleasure and exceptionally peaceful states of mind in the brains of mammals and humans was first established in the scientific community by brain researchers Jose Delgado of Yale University, James Olds and Peter Milner of the Montreal Neurological Institute, and Dr. Robert Heath of Tulane University Medical School.


Brenda Milner | Canadian Association for Neuroscience

can-acn.org [cached]

In 1944, Peter was invited to Canada to work on a project.
The two married and left England two weeks later, headed for Montreal. In Montreal, Milner began work as an instructor at the Institut de Psychologie at the Université de Montreal. A couple of years after arriving in Canada, she began to participate in the seminars of Robert MacLeod at McGill University. When Donald Hebb returned to McGill in 1947, Milner was attended his seminar that discussed his manuscript of The Organization of Behavior. Hebb arranged for Milner to do her thesis research with Wilder Penfield's patients at the Montreal Neurological Institute. Milner received her PhD in physiological psychology in 1952. Patient H.M. and Memory While working with some of Penfield's surgery patients, Milner discovered that those with temporal lobe lesions often complained of poor verbal memory post-operation. Penfield and Milner presented their findings on two patients who had had left temporal lobectomies - which had included parts of the hippocampus - and were suffering from anterograde amnesia following the surgeries. Milner was invited to work with and study H.M. and his intellectual and memory abilities post-operation. The two met for the first time in 1955, and Milner would make the trip to Hartford from Montreal numerous times over the next 30 years. She discovered that although his memory had been severely impaired, his actual intelligence had not been affected. If anything, his IQ had actually shown improvement, likely because he was no longer suffering from frequent seizures. H.M.'s severe impairment in remembering anything new raised questions about the importance of the medial temporal lobe for memory formation. Although H.M. could not remember instructions after one exposure, Milner decided to test whether he could master a task through extensive repetition. She gave him a mirror-drawing task, where he had to trace a star while only looking in the mirror at the image he was tracing. Surprisingly, H.M. improved after many trials spaced over three days, despite the fact that he had no memory of attempting the task previously. This was ground-breaking as it indicated that there was more than one type of memory and learning system. Milner speculated that other motor skills were also acquired outside of the medial temporal lobe. This type of learning is now known as procedural and include skills such as swimming, riding a bike, or speaking a language where you are just able to do it but find it very difficult to explain how you are doing it or learnt it. Milner's work facilitated a huge growth in interest in human memory over past 40 years. Other Work Milner also did research in the role of the frontal lobe in intelligence and memory processing. She found that patients with frontal lobe damage were impaired in their ability to change their way of solving a task even when it has shown to be incorrect, despite the fact that these patients showed normal scores on the typical intelligence tests. She contributed to the early understanding of the lateralization of function - especially speech - and how the two hemispheres of the brain interact with each other. Milner has continued to work on cognitive and memory function in the temporal and frontal lobes of the human brain. She has been investigating bilingualism and the different pathways that are used to acquire native and new languages. She has also used neuroimaging to identify the brain regions and mechanisms involved in language processing in both healthy control subjects and subjects with brain lesions. Milner is currently the Dorothy J. Killam Professor at the MNI. She continues to conduct research and teach as a professor in the Neurology and Neurosurgery department at McGill.


Our Amygdala: The Astral Projection Switch? - Astral Voyage

www.astralvoyage.com [cached]

It was first established in the scientific community by brain researchers Jose Delgado of Yale University, James Olds and Peter Milner of the Montreal Neurological Institute, and Dr. Robert Heath of Tulane University Medical School.


can-acn.org

In 1944, Peter was invited to Canada to work on a project.
The two married and left England two weeks later, headed for Montreal. In Montreal, Milner began work as an instructor at the Institut de Psychologie at the Université de Montreal. A couple of years after arriving in Canada, she began to participate in the seminars of Robert MacLeod at McGill University. When Donald Hebb returned to McGill in 1947, Milner was attended his seminar that discussed his manuscript of The Organization of Behavior. Hebb arranged for Milner to do her thesis research with Wilder Penfield's patients at the Montreal Neurological Institute. Milner received her PhD in physiological psychology in 1952. Patient H.M. and Memory While working with some of Penfield's surgery patients, Milner discovered that those with temporal lobe lesions often complained of poor verbal memory post-operation. Penfield and Milner presented their findings on two patients who had had left temporal lobectomies - which had included parts of the hippocampus - and were suffering from anterograde amnesia following the surgeries. Milner was invited to work with and study H.M. and his intellectual and memory abilities post-operation. The two met for the first time in 1955, and Milner would make the trip to Hartford from Montreal numerous times over the next 30 years. She discovered that although his memory had been severely impaired, his actual intelligence had not been affected. If anything, his IQ had actually shown improvement, likely because he was no longer suffering from frequent seizures. H.M.'s severe impairment in remembering anything new raised questions about the importance of the medial temporal lobe for memory formation. Although H.M. could not remember instructions after one exposure, Milner decided to test whether he could master a task through extensive repetition. She gave him a mirror-drawing task, where he had to trace a star while only looking in the mirror at the image he was tracing. Surprisingly, H.M. improved after many trials spaced over three days, despite the fact that he had no memory of attempting the task previously. This was ground-breaking as it indicated that there was more than one type of memory and learning system. Milner speculated that other motor skills were also acquired outside of the medial temporal lobe. This type of learning is now known as procedural and include skills such as swimming, riding a bike, or speaking a language where you are just able to do it but find it very difficult to explain how you are doing it or learnt it. Milner's work facilitated a huge growth in interest in human memory over past 40 years. Other Work Milner also did research in the role of the frontal lobe in intelligence and memory processing. She found that patients with frontal lobe damage were impaired in their ability to change their way of solving a task even when it has shown to be incorrect, despite the fact that these patients showed normal scores on the typical intelligence tests. She contributed to the early understanding of the lateralization of function - especially speech - and how the two hemispheres of the brain interact with each other. Milner has continued to work on cognitive and memory function in the temporal and frontal lobes of the human brain. She has been investigating bilingualism and the different pathways that are used to acquire native and new languages. She has also used neuroimaging to identify the brain regions and mechanisms involved in language processing in both healthy control subjects and subjects with brain lesions. Milner is currently the Dorothy J. Killam Professor at the MNI. She continues to conduct research and teach as a professor in the Neurology and Neurosurgery department at McGill.


www.withington.manchester.sch.uk

When Peter was invited to help initiate atomic energy research in Canada, the pair were married and sailed North America aboard the zigzagging (to avoid German U-boats) Queen Elizabeth.
In 1950, already doing her PhD at McGill, Milner began studying the epilepsy patients of famed neurosurgeon, Wilder Penfield at the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI). "I fell in love with the place and the work right away," recalls Milner. It was during this time Milner met and began her seminal work with H.M., an epilepsy patient in Hartford, Conn. who suffered severe memory impairment following the removal of the medial temporal lobe on both sides of his brain. Although Milner worked with H.M. over the course of several decades, he never remembered having met her from one day to the next. Having H.M. complete a series of learning tasks, Milner noticed that the only one in which he made progress through practice (virtually impossible for someone who forgets everything they did five minutes ago) was a simple motor coordination task in which he had to trace a large star while looking in a mirror. H.M. improved his performance steadily over a three-day trial, even though he had no recollection of ever having done it in the first place. The findings lead Milner to speculate that certain motor skills can be developed independently of the medial temporal-lobe system. Milner's breakthrough proved that the brain was not just governed by a solitary memory system, a revolutionary concept in the 1950s. Milner has been blazing trails over the last 50 years, making her name as one of the most important neuroscientists of the twentieth century. Along with the accolades have come the awards. She's been inducted into the National Academy of Sciences (USA) and the Royal Societies of London and Canada and is a Companion of the Order of Canada, to name but a few of her honours. All the while, Milner has been carefully socking away the prize money along with her life's savings. "It's funny, because I never had any money. I mean I really never had any money," says Milner. On Oct. 1, Milner took that "little bit of money" and, in conjunction with the launch of the MNI's ‘Thinking Ahead' Campaign announced the formation of the $1 million Brenda Milner Foundation to support postdoctoral fellowships in cognitive neuroscience at the MNI. "[Postdocs] are in a difficult spot," she says. "It is getting harder and harder to get your first academic position." The gift is perfect Milner, someone who says "I have no children except for my students." Although she no longer conducts as much research as before, it is clear Milner is enthusiastic about teaching and about keeping her hand in the game. "I like to be part of things," she says.


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