Peter Jentsch, Research Entomologist At Cornell University's Hudson Valley Laboratory, Cornell University
Share This Profile
Share this profile on Facebook.
Link to this profile on LinkedIn.
Tweet this profile on Twitter.
Email a link to this profile.
See other services through which you can share this profile.
This profile was last updated on 1/22/14 and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.
User Verified.

Mr. Peter John Jentsch

Wrong Peter John Jentsch?

Research Entomologist At Cornell ...

Local Address: Highland, New York, United States
Cornell University
Cornell School of Hotel Administration 489
Statler Hall Ithaca, New York 14853
United States

Company Description: Founded in 1865, Cornell is the federal land-grant institution of New York State, a private endowed university, a member of the Ivy League, and a partner of the...   more
29 Total References
Web References
Peter Jentsch, Cornell ...
www.stopbmsb.org, 15 Sept 2013 [cached]
Peter Jentsch, Cornell University
...
Peter Jentsch, Cornell University
Untitled Document
www.organiclandcare.net, 1 Feb 2012 [cached]
A program designed to update green industry professionals about the early detection and integrated management of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) and Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) - invasive insects of importance that have made their way to the Lower Hudson Valley PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED BY FRIDAY FEBRUARY 24, 2012 Cornell University Entomologist and BMSB Specialist Peter Jentsch will outline the arrival, ID and management of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug and what it means for landscape professionals.
This was the first year that ...
vegetablegrowersnews.com, 1 Jan 2012 [cached]
This was the first year that New York growers experienced economic injury from BMSB, said Peter J. Jentsch, an Extension entomologist at Cornell University's Hudson Valley Laboratory.
"We found severe injury in Orange and Ulster counties this season in four orchard blocks," Jentsch said.
...
It wasn't just BMSB causing issues this past season, Jentsch said. The green stink bug moved into orchards very early in the season, and was found in very high levels by early August. It also injured crops, he said.
BMSB, which has two generations in the Hudson Valley, was observed to move into orchards at the onset of the second generation around mid-August. Fruit damage, first detected in Red Delicious apples in early August, was predominately attributed to green stink bugs. Yet feeding damage continued through mid-October, with BMSB found almost exclusively to be feeding on the fruit, Jentsch said.
Stink bugs are very elusive, and not easily seen in the field, Jentsch said. To determine the composition and density of the stink bug populations, researchers are using a combination of newly developed lures from USDA (USDA No. 10 in combination with the geometric isomer of methyl 2,4,6-decatrienoate), along with high-intensity light trapping, he said.
"Using these trapping methods, we found both species along the field edge and within the center of orchard blocks," he said.
Cornell University entomologist ...
www.poughkeepsiejournal.com, 17 May 2011 [cached]
Cornell University entomologist Peter Jentsch holds a brown-marmorated stink bug at the Cornell Extension's Hudson Valley labs in Highland last month. Jentsch and other entomologists are studying and monitoring the invasive insect because it poses a serious threat to area orchard crops such as apples, pears and peaches. Joe Larese/Gannett News Service Cornell University entomologist Peter Jentsch replaces a container containing brown-marmorated stink bugs in the screened-in colony at the Cornell Extension's Hudson Valley labs in Highland. Joe Larese/Gannett News Service
...
Cornell University entomologist Peter Jentsch holds a brown-marmorated stink bug at the Cornell Extension's Hudson Valley labs in Highland last month. Jentsch and other entomologists are studying and monitoring the invasive insect because it poses a serious threat to area orchard crops such as apples, pears and peaches. Joe Larese/Gannett News Service Cornell University entomologist Peter Jentsch replaces a container containing brown-marmorated stink bugs in the screened-in colony at the Cornell Extension's Hudson Valley labs in Highland. Joe Larese/Gannett News Service
...
Cornell University entomologist Peter Jentsch holds a brown-marmorated stink bug at the Cornell Extension's Hudson Valley labs in Highland last month. Jentsch and other entomologists are studying and monitoring the invasive insect because it poses a serious threat to area orchard crops such as apples, pears and peaches. Joe Larese/Gannett News Service Cornell University entomologist Peter Jentsch replaces a container containing brown-marmorated stink bugs in the screened-in colony at the Cornell Extension's Hudson Valley labs in Highland. Joe Larese/Gannett News Service
...
"They haven't had any documented cases of economic loss here, but Rutgers (University) has documented millions of dollars in peach crop losses in New Jersey," said Peter Jentsch, a veteran entomologist at Cornell University's Hudson Valley laboratory in Highland. "That's one of the reasons that we're gearing up for this - it's heading north."
The immigrant insect probably arrived in the mid-1990s in shipping crates and was first confirmed in Pennsylvania in 1998. It belongs to the insect family Pentatomidae and is a pest in China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan.
Since arriving on U.S. soil, Jentsch said, the six-legged bug has wiped out as much as 80 percent of fruit crops in some farms it has hit on its scurry through West Virginia, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware and New Jersey.
It has been found in 32 states.
"In Maryland, where they have soybean fields close to fruit orchards, they saw clouds or waves of these things just flying from the soybeans into an orchard," said Jentsch.
...
"It has this aggregation pheromone," Jentsch said.
...
Jentsch said the smell is used as a defense mechanism, primarily against birds.
...
"It's the safest and the most effective method," Jentsch said.
Peter Jentsch, Cornell ...
www.post-journal.com, 4 Feb 2012 [cached]
Peter Jentsch, Cornell University entomologist and BMSB specialist, will outline the arrival, identification and management of brown marmorated stink bug and what it means for landscape professionals.
Other People with the name "Jentsch":
Other ZoomInfo Searches
Accelerate your business with the industry's most comprehensive profiles on business people and companies.
Find business contacts by city, industry and title. Our B2B directory has just-verified and in-depth profiles, plus the market's top tools for searching, targeting and tracking.
Atlanta | Boston | Chicago | Houston | Los Angeles | New York
Browse ZoomInfo's business people directory. Our professional profiles include verified contact information, biography, work history, affiliations and more.
Browse ZoomInfo's company directory. Our company profiles include corporate background information, detailed descriptions, and links to comprehensive employee profiles with verified contact information.
zirhbt201304