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2017-03-22T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Pavel Khodorkovskiy?

Pavel Khodorkovskiy

Chief Technology Officer, Co-Founder

Enertiv Inc

Direct Phone: (646) ***-****       

Email: p***@***.com

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Enertiv Inc

320 W. 37th St., 15th Floor

New York City, New York 10018

United States

Company Description

Enertiv is a leading energy data and analytics company. We're revolutionizing the way energy is collected, visualized and analyzed in buildings. Our platform transforms real-time energy data into actionable insights. We're taking the mystery out of energy ... more

Find other employees at this company (39)

Background Information

Employment History

President

Institute of Modern Russia, Inc.

One of the Creators

The Russian Visionaries

French Ambassador

Human Rights Fran├žois Zimeray

Education

business administration

Babson College

Web References (79 Total References)


WAC Event Calendar Page - World Affairs Council of Dallas/Fort Worth

www.dfwworld.org [cached]

Featuring Pavel Khodorkovsky, President, Institute of Modern Russia

...
Pavel Khodorkovsky
The U.S. and Russia have long been at odds with one another due to a fundamental gap in government philosophy. Not many have experienced both sides of this cultural divide quite as vividly as Pavel Khodorkovsky, the 27-year-old co-founder of an American-based energy monitoring firm called Enertiv. Born in Russia, Pavel was raised in a family that was critical of their government. His father, Mikhail, was an outspoken advocate of private property rights and modern democracy, so much so that his father was forcefully imprisoned, and his company's assets seized, while Pavel was attending university in the U.S. Unable to return to his homeland for fear of being imprisoned himself, Pavel has become dedicated to raising his own profile to influence change in Russia, namely to improve the power of law, promote democracy and to improve relations between Russia and other nations.
Join Pavel for a glass of wine at Times Ten Cellars this November and hear about his thoughts on the Russian government and his hopes for the future.


theARCHIVES | www.peggysmedleyshow.com

www.peggysmedleyshow.com [cached]

Pavel Kodorkovskiy, CTO and cofounder, Enertiv, talks about Enertiv's energy efficiency solutions and the need for greater transparency in energy usage.


The Washington-based Institute of ...

www.imrussia.org [cached]

The Washington-based Institute of Modern Russia, founded by Mikhail Khodorkovsky's son Pavel, has welcomed the decision of the president of the Russian Federation, Vladimir Putin, to pardon the former owner and head of the Yukos oil company.

...
Pavel Khodorkovsky, the son of Mikhail Khodorkovsky, lives in the United States and says he is in touch with his father-who has been in prison in Russia for almost a decade-at least every other week.
...
The last time Pavel Khodorkovsky, 28, saw his father was in September 2003 when Mikhail stopped by Babson College near Boston to see how his son was doing with business management studies.
...
Pavel showed him around the campus, and Mikhail went on to a business meeting in Washington D.C.
...
The phone rang one month later (Pavel remembers it was a Saturday morning), and his mother told him that his father had been arrested.
I am meeting Pavel Khodorkovsky at the Institute of Modern Russia, which is located in the Garment District of Manhattan. Entering the building, I sidestep a rack of dark brown fur coats glittering in the New York autumn sun. "Good place with a reasonable price," Pavel explains the practical choice of the office's location.
The office of the think tank Pavel founded three years ago is an ordinary, ascetic space-the walls are white, the furniture black, the coffee machine in one corner, the restroom around the corner down the hall. The two young ladies and the young man clattering on the keyboards are obviously used to hearing Mikhail Khodorkovsky being discussed in the corner of their office.
Pavel is a chip off the old block, his dark eyes sparkling when he shakes my hand with a friendly smile. He is well-versed, his talking accompanied by vivid gesticulation, and only a hint of a sore throat occasionally breaks his flow.
...
Pavel runs an energy-monitoring company called Enertiv, where he is also a partner. If he is not on a business trip to France, Belgium, the United Kingdom, or Germany, he works out of the business office located next door to the institute. He likes to walk there from his Chelsea home. And the evenings he spends with his wife and three-year-old daughter.
...
Critiquing Russia gives Pavel a feeling of kinship with his father, he says. He does get to talk to his father, once every two weeks when his phone rings and it is his dad on the other end.


Pavel Khodorkovsky, the son of ...

www.imrussia.org [cached]

Pavel Khodorkovsky, the son of Mikhail Khodorkovsky, lives in the United States and says he is in touch with his father-who has been in prison in Russia for almost a decade-at least every other week.

...
The last time Pavel Khodorkovsky, 28, saw his father was in September 2003 when Mikhail stopped by Babson College near Boston to see how his son was doing with business management studies.
...
Pavel showed him around the campus, and Mikhail went on to a business meeting in Washington D.C.
...
The phone rang one month later (Pavel remembers it was a Saturday morning), and his mother told him that his father had been arrested.
I am meeting Pavel Khodorkovsky at the Institute of Modern Russia, which is located in the Garment District of Manhattan. Entering the building, I sidestep a rack of dark brown fur coats glittering in the New York autumn sun. "Good place with a reasonable price," Pavel explains the practical choice of the office's location.
The office of the think tank Pavel founded three years ago is an ordinary, ascetic space-the walls are white, the furniture black, the coffee machine in one corner, the restroom around the corner down the hall. The two young ladies and the young man clattering on the keyboards are obviously used to hearing Mikhail Khodorkovsky being discussed in the corner of their office.
Pavel is a chip off the old block, his dark eyes sparkling when he shakes my hand with a friendly smile. He is well-versed, his talking accompanied by vivid gesticulation, and only a hint of a sore throat occasionally breaks his flow.
...
Pavel runs an energy-monitoring company called Enertiv, where he is also a partner. If he is not on a business trip to France, Belgium, the United Kingdom, or Germany, he works out of the business office located next door to the institute. He likes to walk there from his Chelsea home. And the evenings he spends with his wife and three-year-old daughter.
...
Critiquing Russia gives Pavel a feeling of kinship with his father, he says. He does get to talk to his father, once every two weeks when his phone rings and it is his dad on the other end.


NEW YORK - Pavel Khodorkovsky, ...

www.themoscowtimes.com [cached]

NEW YORK - Pavel Khodorkovsky, the eldest son of imprisoned tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky, keeps a Boston-Moscow plane ticket in his closet in his New York apartment as a memento.

...
Seven years later, Pavel said he never expected to live in self-imposed exile for so long.
"I never thought that I would stay here. I had another plan initially," Pavel said in a rare interview over a cup of black coffee in a New York cafe.
His father probably couldn't have said it better himself.
The arrest of Russia's once-wealthiest businessman in 2003 changed the plans of many people, ranging from his immediate family to the scores of investors linked to his now-bankrupt Yukos oil company or simply interested in investing in Russia.
But for Pavel, whose parents divorced when he was 3, the change of plans is purely a personal loss. His father missed his wedding last year and the birth of his first granddaughter in December. While the two remain in contact through letters, his father has little opportunity to assist in the development of his first business, an energy monitoring company.
...
Pavel, 25, said he felt optimistic about the trial's outcome but did not expect an outright acquittal because that would allow his father to be freed when his current sentence ends next year.
...
Pavel Khodorkovsky denied the murder allegation.
In the New York cafe, Pavel, dressed in jeans and a black T-shirt, looks very much like his father, especially when he smiles. His smiles were frequent during a recent interview, and he constantly forgot his coffee, sipping it only after being reminded.
Pavel was just 18 when he moved to the United States in fall 2003 to study business administration at Babson College near Boston after graduating from a high school in Switzerland. He said he chose to study in the United States on his own and his decision was not connected with what was going on with Yukos.
"Father just advised me to study at a university abroad. ... I decided to go to the United States, but Dad didn't influence my decision," he said.
Pavel, Khodorkovsky's son from his first marriage, said he had an "excellent" relationship with his father as a boy but complained that he seldom saw him because his father worked long hours. He said his mother, who lives in Moscow and calls him almost daily, never forbade him from seeing his father.
...
Pavel said he missed his father and regretted only growing especially close to him in the months before his arrest.
"The most painful thing is that we started communicating the most after I graduated from high school," he said, adding that he saw his father frequently during the 10 weeks that he spent in Moscow in summer 2003 before leaving for college in the United States.
Pavel said, however, that it was clear at the time that the situation over Yukos was heating up.
"When I was leaving, the company was under pressure, but it was unclear how serious the attack against the management would be," he said.
He said his father seemed to sense his looming arrest when he visited his son in Boston in September 2003.
"I asked him how things were going, and he said that imprisoning him was the only thing left to do," he said.
...
Mikhail Khodorkovsky had been financing opposition parties before State Duma elections in December 2003, and Pavel said Putin might have feared that his father's support would result in the creation of a "serious political force.
...
"He never told me about this," Pavel said. "When he said that he planned to leave the business, turning to politics, at the age of 45, he didn't mean running in presidential elections."
He said his father had wanted to develop democracy and civil society through Open Russia, a public organization founded by Yukos shareholders to implement charity and educational programs.
Pavel said he had planned to return to Russia after graduating from college. "But when Father got imprisoned, coming to Moscow made no sense anymore," he said.
After getting a bachelor's degree, he moved to New York in 2007 and started working with New Media Internet, a New York-based company owned by self-exiled media tycoon Vladimir Gusinsky. The company oversees technical support for web sites, including Russia's Newsru.com and Inopressa.ru.
"It was my first job," said Pavel, who continues to work for the company as a project manager.
He said he likes the job but longed to run his own business. So earlier this year he founded Enertiv, which makes equipment and software to remotely monitor energy consumption. The company's products allow clients - private businesses and institutions - to monitor online the amount of electricity consumed by every circuit in a building, Pavel said, adding that the system helps to reduce energy consumption costs.
He said Enertiv had no rivals on the U.S. market and has yet to post a profit.
After leaving Russia, Pavel has remained in touch with his father's parents, relying on them for the latest news.
...
"My dad has expressed many times in his letters to me his regret that he is not able to hold his granddaughter and how much he is looking forward to it," Pavel said.

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