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This profile was last updated on 5/2/06  and contains information from public web pages.
 
Background

Employment History

Web References
Times Community Newspapers - Five Bealeton bypass options offered
www.timescommunity.com, 2 May 2006 [cached]
This Thursday work session followed a $35,000 county allotment that allowed Joe Mehra, local transportation consultant, and Paul Templeton, chief of highway design for HNTB Corporation in Arlington, to research how best to develop the road.
...
Differences among the plans, as provided on a summary sheet from Templeton, are noted in the road's development toward U.S. 17.
...
The first alternative is five and one-tenth miles long, Templeton told commissioners.The second and third options run five-and-a-half and four-and-a-half miles long, respectively; the fourth is six miles long and the final option is six-and-a-half miles long.
The next phase of roadway study will include specifics about cost.
"We haven't really done (cost estimates)," Templeton said.
Springfield Mixing Bowl Tosses Up A Medly of Challenges
www.enr.com, 7 June 2002 [cached]
HNTB Corp, Kansas City, started preliminary design in 1993, says Paul Templeton, HNTB chief of highway design."We had 12 concepts" for what to do with the route in the beginning, he recalls.Suggestions included sinking I-95 underground, reminiscent of the Boston Central/Artery project."This [chosen design] was No. 12," he says.The mission is to eliminate the weaves with improved local roads, high-occupancy vehicle lanes and improved ramps."It's like building three projects in one," within existing right-of-way, he says.
Martinez notes that the controversial project received lots of "doom and gloom" media coverage.Templeton concurs, saying "the first predictions were that traffic was going to collapse" as the first two major contracts of the seven-step program began in 1999.Those contracts, awarded to Shirley Contracting Corp., Lorton, Va., for a total of $90 million, entailed building 15 new bridges and widening four miles of arterial roads at I-95's intersection with Route 644, just south of the I-95/395/295 interchange.Shirley completed the work nearly a year ahead of schedule, netting a $10-million bonus, and now is working on Phase 4 (ENR 5/14/01 p. 14).
FLYOVER New ramps will ease interchange transitions. (Photo courtesy of the Virginia Department of Transportation/Tom Saunders)
McGraw-Hill Construction | ENR - Springfield Mixing Bowl Tosses Up A Medly of Challenges
enr.construction.com, 6 May 2002 [cached]
HNTB Corp, Kansas City, started preliminary design in 1993, says Paul Templeton, HNTB chief of highway design."We had 12 concepts" for what to do with the route in the beginning, he recalls.Suggestions included sinking I,95 underground, reminiscent of the Boston Central/Artery project."This [chosen design] was No. 12," he says.The mission is to eliminate the weaves with improved local roads, high,occupancy vehicle lanes and improved ramps."It's like building three projects in one," within existing right,of,way, he says.
Martinez notes that the controversial project received lots of "doom and gloom" media coverage.Templeton concurs, saying "the first predictions were that traffic was going to collapse" as the first two major contracts of the seven,step program began in 1999.
Springfield Mixing Bowl Tosses Up A Medly of Challenges
www.enr.com, 2 May 2002 [cached]
HNTB Corp, Kansas City, started preliminary design in 1993, says Paul Templeton, HNTB chief of highway design."We had 12 concepts" for what to do with the route in the beginning, he recalls.Suggestions included sinking I-95 underground, reminiscent of the Boston Central/Artery project."This [chosen design] was No. 12," he says.The mission is to eliminate the weaves with improved local roads, high-occupancy vehicle lanes and improved ramps."It's like building three projects in one," within existing right-of-way, he says.
Martinez notes that the controversial project received lots of "doom and gloom" media coverage.Templeton concurs, saying "the first predictions were that traffic was going to collapse" as the first two major contracts of the seven-step program began in 1999.Those contracts, awarded to Shirley Contracting Corp., Lorton, Va., for a total of $90 million, entailed building 15 new bridges and widening four miles of arterial roads at I-95's intersection with Route 644, just south of the I-95/395/295 interchange.Shirley completed the work nearly a year ahead of schedule, netting a $10-million bonus, and now is working on Phase 4 (ENR 5/14/01 p. 14).
FLYOVER New ramps will ease interchange transitions. (Photo courtesy of the Virginia Department of Transportation/Tom Saunders)
Civil Engineering Magazine - June 2006
www.pubs.asce.org, 1 June 2006 [cached]
Paul Templeton, the chief of highway design in the Arlington, Virginia, office of HNTB Corporation, began his civil engineering career in 1958 with the Virginia highway department.At that time, the interstates represented a stunning increase in the scale of highway construction.Before the interstates were constructed, Templeton says, he routinely dealt with road projects with cross sections of 50 to 100 ft (15 to 30 m)."All of a sudden we had these three hundred to four hundred foot wide sections," he recalls.
...
Templeton says that, beginning in the early 1970s, state highway departments also worked to improve safety on interstate roads and bridges, for example, by widening shoulders on bridges.He recalls that bridges that were longer than 200 ft (61 m) initially had shoulders of just 3 to 5 ft (1 to 1.5 m), depending on when they had been designed.To improve safety, those shoulders were increased to 6 ft (1.8 m) on the left and 12 ft (3.6 m) on the right for bridges with two lanes in the same direction; the shoulders on bridges with three or more lanes in the same direction were increased to 12 ft (3.7 m) on each side, Templeton says.
Guardrail systems also were strengthened.Spacings that had been 12 ft 6 in. (3.8 m) on center were tightened to 6 ft 3 in. (1.9 m) or even less to reduce deflection.Even shorter spacings were used at bridges and concrete barriers to help prevent a vehicle from breaking through the guardrail on impact, and ground-mounted signs were fitted with breakaway bases, Templeton says.
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