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This profile was last updated on 2/26/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Program Systems Engineer

Local Address: Florida, United States
NASA
 
Background

Employment History

40 Total References
Web References
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www.linsgroup.com, 12 April 2005 [cached]
Paul Mogan, a legally blind electronic engineer at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, says JORDY is best suited to stationary tasks like reading. He wants to help create the next incarnation, special sunglasses linked to a wireless computer that can fit on a belt or in a pocket.
With a voice chip, GPS and image processors, the visor could serve as a sort of on-board navigation system for the blind, calling out hazards, announcing nearby shops, even reading signs that say what's on sale.
NASA has a compatible goal: The space agency wants a wearable wireless computer that would help technicians work independently outside a spacecraft.
"NASA has this initiative to go to the moon and Mars, and you're not going to be able to take a ton of crew, so you're going to have to be very efficient in what you're going to do," Mogan says.
Find Device Manager Electronics Portal BR
electronicsdir.montreal.qc.ca, 7 Sept 2007 [cached]
Paul Mogan, Project Manager, Operational Spaceport Project Office, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
Enhanced Vision News - Press Release Page
www.enhancedvision.com, 8 April 2004 [cached]
Legally blind for more than 22 years, Paul Mogan, a Spaceport Engineering and Technology Project Manager at KSC, isn't going to let his blindness stop him from helping NASA achieve its vision for the future.
Mogan and a team of research partners are working to create visual aids for people with sight disabilities.The device they plan to create would help millions of people worldwide and further advance NASA's progress in science and technology. The invention is being designed to resemble a pair of sunglasses that would enlarge and enhance images and provide wayfinding, hazard warnings and much more.
"The ideal ‘ultimate visual aid' would recognize speech, speak text to the user, and use a combination of these features with GPS and wireless Internet services to guide visually impaired people, place phone calls and magnify images," said Mogan."It would be stylish, easy to use, very versatile, portable and reasonably priced."
Mogan and his primary research partners, West Virginia University and Georgia Institute of Technology, have been working on the project for more than a year.The innovations also would help Mogan, who has Stargardt's Syndrome, a form of macular dystrophy that begins early in life.
...
"We are trying to ‘ride the wave' of technology currently being pushed by the large consumer market," said Mogan.
A Second Set Of Eyes
www.spacedaily.com, 4 Nov 2005 [cached]
Paul Mogan once struggled with tasks people with sight often take for granted.Visually impaired since the age of 19, Mogan couldn't read the engineering reference books he needed for his job; they were too heavy to hold up close to his face.And filling out paper forms wasn't easy, because once his magnifying glass was close enough to the paper for him to read it, there usually wasn't room for the pen.
But that was life before JORDY.
In 1999, Mogan became one of the first to use the device, also known as the Joint Optical Reflective Display, which is based on NASA technology.Normally, his vision is only about five percent of the average person's sight.When he first tried JORDY, he immediately noticed the difference.
...
Mogan, a NASA engineer at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, has benefited so greatly from this technology that he now contributes to the device's continued improvement.
After he began using JORDY 1, he contacted the company with some suggestions, including adding image stabilization.This relationship continued as later versions of the device were released.
"I have personally made trips to see the lead designer at Enhanced Vision Systems on several occasions and am part of their Beta test group," he explains.
Technology Discussion: The blind struggle as gadgets proliferate
www.indyevents.com, 18 July 2004 [cached]
Paul Mogan, a legally blind electronic engineer at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, says JORDY is best suited to stationary tasks like reading.He wants to help create the next incarnation, special sunglasses linked to a wireless computer that can fit on a belt or in a pocket.
With a voice chip, GPS and image processors, the visor could serve as a sort of on-board navigation system for the blind, calling out hazards, announcing nearby shops, even reading signs that say what's on sale.
NASA has a compatible goal: The space agency wants a wearable wireless computer that would help technicians work independently outside a spacecraft.
"NASA has this initiative to go to the moon and Mars, and you're not going to be able to take a ton of crew, so you're going to have to be very efficient in what you're going to do," Mogan says.
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