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Wrong Paul Honigfort?

Paul Honigfort

Consumer Safety Officer

Food and Drug Administration

HQ Phone:  (888) 463-6332

Email: h***@***.gov

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Food and Drug Administration

10903 New Hampshire Ave

Silver Spring, Maryland,20993

United States

Company Description

China's Food and Drug Administration (SFDA) is now offering a reward of about 50,000 US dollars for relevant information on counterfeit drug production. The bounty aims to "encourage the public to report illegal activities so as to determine, control and elimi... more

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Web References(19 Total References)


Non-Stick Cookware Safety | Cookware Manufacturers Association

cookware.org [cached]

Commenting on the FDA research, Paul Honigfort, Ph.D., Consumer Safety Officer for FDA stated[8] that "[a]t this time, we have no reason to change our position that the use of ... perfluorocarbon resin ... [nonstick coatings] are safe for use in contact with food as described in the applicable regulations or notifications.
[1] Letter dated November 22, 2005, from Paul Honigfort, Ph.D., Consumer Safety Officer, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U.S. Food and Drug Administration to George G. Misko, Keller and Heckman, LLP, Washington, DC. [8] Letter dated November 22, 2005, from Paul Honigfort, Ph.D., Consumer Safety Officer, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U.S. Food and Drug Administration to George G. Misko, Keller and Heckman, LLP, Washington, DC.


Regulatory - IntertechPira

www.intertechpira.com [cached]

The final day started with an opening address from Dr Paul Honigfort of the FDA concerning regulatory requirements for paper and board, areas of development, as well as varying conditions of use.


www.intertechpira.com

The final day started with an opening address from Dr Paul Honigfort of the FDA concerning regulatory requirements for paper and board, areas of development, as well as varying conditions of use.


www.norellinc.com

What no one has yet researched is whether overheating these pans regularly for a prolonged period might have long-term effects. Outdated Fears If cookware is flaking, you might accidentally swallow a chip â€" but don't be concerned, says Paul Honigfort, Ph.D., a consumer safety officer with the Food and Drug Administration."A small particle would most likely just pass through the body, without being absorbed and without having any ill effect on the person's health," he says. Also of less concern than previously believed: the danger of nonstick pans exposing the family to PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid)."What we found was that the manufacturing process used to make those pans drives off the PFOA," says Honigfort, meaning that the chemical evaporates.Newer products may be harder to chip, "because the adhesion between the pan and the nonstick coating is better," says Honigfort.


www.norellinc.com

If cookware is flaking, you might accidentally swallow a chip â€" but don't be concerned, says Paul Honigfort, Ph.D., a consumer safety officer with the Food and Drug Administration."A small particle would most likely just pass through the body, without being absorbed and without having any ill effect on the person's health," he says."What we found was that the manufacturing process used to make those pans drives off the PFOA," says Honigfort, meaning that the chemical evaporates.Newer products may be harder to chip, "because the adhesion between the pan and the nonstick coating is better," says Honigfort.


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