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This profile was last updated on 3/1/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. Paul Gittelsohn

Wrong Dr. Paul Gittelsohn?

Owner

VIDEOsyncracies Production & Duplication
Phone: (802) ***-****  HQ Phone
Email: p***@***.com
Local Address: Burlington, Vermont, United States
Videosyncracies Inc
Click For Map And Directions To 4 Laurel Hill Drive
South Burlington, Vermont 05403
United States

 
Background

Employment History

Education

  • film production
    San Francisco State University
  • bachelors degree , Mass Communication
    UVM
11 Total References
Web References
Burlington video producer Paul ...
www.vermontguides.com, 1 Mar 2014 [cached]
Burlington video producer Paul Gittelsohn, the owner of VIDEOSyncracies Inc., announced that his 28-minute documentary, The Story of Banjo Dan and the Mid-Nite Plowboys, was chosen to be screened at the 7th Annual International Bluegrass Music and Museum Film Festival in Redwood City, Calif. Will Lindner, a writer for Business People-Vermont, was a member of the Bluegrass group, which disbanded in 2012.
VIDEOsyncracies, Paul ...
businesspeoplevermont.com, 28 Jan 2013 [cached]
VIDEOsyncracies, Paul Gittelsohn Business People-Vermont: VIDEOsyncracies, Paul Gittelsohn
NEW THIS MONTH | RECENT ARTICLES | BIBLIOGRAPHY | MEDIA KIT | SUBSCRIBE
...
Since the mid-1980s, Paul Gittelsohn has produced hundreds of instructional, promotional, and educational videos, duplicated CDs and DVDs, and transferred images and sound to CDs and DVDs from aging media like VHS, 8-millimeter film, and reel-to-reel audio tape. He is the owner of VIDEOsyncracies Production & Duplication in Burlington.
You gotta have fun," says videographer Paul Gittelsohn, proprietor of VIDEOsyncracies Production & Duplication in Burlington.
Gittelsohn's characteristic expression is a wry smile, and when he's telling stories - obviously a favorite pastime - he's apt to interrupt himself and rewind his tale to the beginning so he can add a funny detail he'd forgotten.
...
Gittelsohn has spent years accumulating equipment that enables him to provide these services efficiently and with high quality. He recalls stringing VCRs together in a "daisy chain," laboriously duplicating video products five at a time.
Now, though, he has modern duplicating equipment and 25-plus years' worth of work - 24 metal drawers of DVD and CD masters; a wall 12 feet wide and 8 feet high filled with videotape masters; and 1,000 or more mini DV video tapes stored in former library card catalog boxes.
"It's my life's work," he says, "like the warehouse archives. For example, in 1991 a New York state woman with an affinity for camelids had written a book on llama and alpaca training and handling, and wanted to make an instructional video to sell as another product. She had no budget, but Gittelsohn journeyed to her farm and launched a partnership with her that has lasted through seven videos and more than 20 years.
She's still selling those videos from her website, and Gittelsohn gets 35 percent of each sale. He can reproduce them at will from the masters he has saved.
...
Primarily, though, the fun for Gittelsohn is in video production, a creative outlet that keeps him constantly learning new things as he works with his clients to figure out how to convey their specialized information. Fun does not preclude long, hard, meticulous work at editing.
"Paul is like a mad scientist," says Francis (Rich) Finigan, a sometimes resident of Randolph and the founder of Environmental Safeguard Professionals.
...
"Paul's a highly intelligent guy with a dry sense of humor that he can use to break the tension during those long hours of editing."
...
All this accessibility, and Paul was really, always, my first choice."
Since starting VIDEOsyncracies in 1987, Gittelsohn has produced hundreds of instructional, promotional, and educational videos. His projects fall into three categories: videos he is paid to produce; videos he produces on spec (llama training was one of these); and "event" videos for hire, such as a dance recitals and performances. "Never, ever, a wedding!
...
Levine shot the footage, but hired Gittelsohn for the editing.
...
"'Genius!'" Gittelsohn exclaims, "with 10 exclamation points!"
Now 54, Gittelsohn spent most of his youth in a residential neighborhood in Baltimore, but his ties to Vermont formed early. His father, Alan, was a professor of biostatistics at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, where he formed a personal and professional relationship with renowned healthcare researcher Jack Wennberg.
The Wennbergs moved to Waterbury in the mid-1960s, and the Gittelsohns began spending summers here. In the early 1970s Dr. Gittelsohn and Dr. Wennberg formed a private health-statistics office in Burlington.
...
From then on, young Gittelsohn had one foot in Baltimore and the other in Burlington. He attended high schools in both cities.
Playing with the Wennbergs' children at their 50 acres in Waterbury Center planted the seeds of Gittelsohn's future career. "Someone had a super-8 camera," he recalls. "We would make tons of corny kid films - jumping out of the barn, making chickens disappear."
In 1974, still in high school, he landed a summer job in Burlington as a projectionist for a college film study class and took a course in basic filmmaking, which gave him an opportunity to make his own movie. He elected to animate his kitchen.
"I made everything come to life," he says. "It was stop-motion animation. You take two frames, 'click-click,' then move the object a quarter of an inch and go 'click-click.' Very painstaking. The kitchen objects had a little funeral around a broken glass, and then there was a revolt. I emptied the cupboard and the refrigerator and had them marching out the door."
Next stop was the University of Vermont, where Gittelsohn pursued a parallel interest in folk and bluegrass music. "That was extracurricular," he says.
He had a radio show on the college station, WRUV, and in selecting records from the station's vast library, he stumbled upon The Cats & the Fiddle, a black jive/swing vocal quartet from the '30s and '40s who accompanied themselves on guitar, bass, and tiple. That sent Gittelsohn over the edge. He bought a tiple (an obscure, 10-string instrument) and moved to San Francisco to play on the streets.
"I did that for eight months," he says, "and then got into this trio doing Cats & the Fiddle songs. I earned my living doing that for a year."
He enrolled at San Francisco State film school, earning, he says, "about a year's worth of credits," but returned to UVM to finish his bachelor's degree in mass communication.
His first real job behind a camera was with WCAX-TV as a news videographer and editor for a year and a half. He left to teach video production at Harwood Union High School and Middle School in South Duxbury.
...
Gittelsohn found himself shooting from rooftops at two in the morning and editing with borrowed equipment when he could steal the time.
This seems an unlikely beginning for a successful company, but it was a harbinger of the varied and unusual projects VIDEOsyncracies has taken on since then.
Gittelsohn lives in Queen City Park in Burlington with his wife, Ellen, a part-time librarian who helps with marketing at VIDEOsyncracies.
Their son, Isaac, is in 10th grade, and Gittelsohn has two grown children from a previous marriage: Claire, 22, who recently graduated from UVM, and Elliott, 24, a - drum roll, please! - professional contortionist in San Francisco.
Gittelsohn collects oddball instruments like tiple, tenor banjos, and banjo-mandolins, and has played with the Onion River Dixieland Jazz Band since the '80s.
Things are changing in the video world. "Everything's being put on the Internet," he says, "and people are used to getting things for free."
Someone of a different personality might feel threatened, but Gittelsohn is taking it in stride.
production
www.vidsync.com, 10 Jan 2011 [cached]
VIDEOSyncracies president, Paul Gittelsohn, made his first Super 8 films at age 10. He went on to study film production at San Francisco State University and graduated from UVM with a bachelors degree in Mass Communication.
After gaining experience as a news photographer and editor at CBS affiliate Channel 3 News in Burlington, Vermont he taught video production and animation at Harwood Union High School. Paul founded VIDEO Syncracies in 1987 and has completed hundreds of video productions for a diverse clientele.
Paul works closely with clients through all phases of a production to insure clients information, concepts or products are presented on video how they want them to be presented.
...
Paul Gittelsohn 4 Laurel Hill Drive, South Burlington, Vermont 05403 1-800-559-0000 (802) 861-6161
VIDEOsyncracies, Paul ...
www.vermontguides.com, 31 July 2012 [cached]
VIDEOsyncracies, Paul Gittelsohn Business People-Vermont: VIDEOsyncracies, Paul Gittelsohn
NEW THIS MONTH | RECENT ARTICLES | BIBLIOGRAPHY | MEDIA KIT | SUBSCRIBE
...
Since the mid-1980s, Paul Gittelsohn has produced hundreds of instructional, promotional, and educational videos, duplicated CDs and DVDs, and transferred images and sound to CDs and DVDs from aging media like VHS, 8-millimeter film, and reel-to-reel audio tape. He is the owner of VIDEOsyncracies Production & Duplication in Burlington.
You gotta have fun," says videographer Paul Gittelsohn, proprietor of VIDEOsyncracies Production & Duplication in Burlington.
Gittelsohn's characteristic expression is a wry smile, and when he's telling stories - obviously a favorite pastime - he's apt to interrupt himself and rewind his tale to the beginning so he can add a funny detail he'd forgotten.
...
Gittelsohn has spent years accumulating equipment that enables him to provide these services efficiently and with high quality. He recalls stringing VCRs together in a "daisy chain," laboriously duplicating video products five at a time.
Now, though, he has modern duplicating equipment and 25-plus years' worth of work - 24 metal drawers of DVD and CD masters; a wall 12 feet wide and 8 feet high filled with videotape masters; and 1,000 or more mini DV video tapes stored in former library card catalog boxes.
"It's my life's work," he says, "like the warehouse archives. For example, in 1991 a New York state woman with an affinity for camelids had written a book on llama and alpaca training and handling, and wanted to make an instructional video to sell as another product. She had no budget, but Gittelsohn journeyed to her farm and launched a partnership with her that has lasted through seven videos and more than 20 years.
She's still selling those videos from her website, and Gittelsohn gets 35 percent of each sale. He can reproduce them at will from the masters he has saved.
...
Primarily, though, the fun for Gittelsohn is in video production, a creative outlet that keeps him constantly learning new things as he works with his clients to figure out how to convey their specialized information. Fun does not preclude long, hard, meticulous work at editing.
"Paul is like a mad scientist," says Francis (Rich) Finigan, a sometimes resident of Randolph and the founder of Environmental Safeguard Professionals.
...
"Paul's a highly intelligent guy with a dry sense of humor that he can use to break the tension during those long hours of editing."
...
All this accessibility, and Paul was really, always, my first choice."
Since starting VIDEOsyncracies in 1987, Gittelsohn has produced hundreds of instructional, promotional, and educational videos. His projects fall into three categories: videos he is paid to produce; videos he produces on spec (llama training was one of these); and "event" videos for hire, such as a dance recitals and performances. "Never, ever, a wedding!
...
Levine shot the footage, but hired Gittelsohn for the editing.
...
"'Genius!'" Gittelsohn exclaims, "with 10 exclamation points!"
Now 54, Gittelsohn spent most of his youth in a residential neighborhood in Baltimore, but his ties to Vermont formed early. His father, Alan, was a professor of biostatistics at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, where he formed a personal and professional relationship with renowned healthcare researcher Jack Wennberg.
The Wennbergs moved to Waterbury in the mid-1960s, and the Gittelsohns began spending summers here. In the early 1970s Dr. Gittelsohn and Dr. Wennberg formed a private health-statistics office in Burlington.
...
From then on, young Gittelsohn had one foot in Baltimore and the other in Burlington. He attended high schools in both cities.
Playing with the Wennbergs' children at their 50 acres in Waterbury Center planted the seeds of Gittelsohn's future career. "Someone had a super-8 camera," he recalls. "We would make tons of corny kid films - jumping out of the barn, making chickens disappear."
In 1974, still in high school, he landed a summer job in Burlington as a projectionist for a college film study class and took a course in basic filmmaking, which gave him an opportunity to make his own movie. He elected to animate his kitchen.
"I made everything come to life," he says. "It was stop-motion animation. You take two frames, 'click-click,' then move the object a quarter of an inch and go 'click-click.' Very painstaking. The kitchen objects had a little funeral around a broken glass, and then there was a revolt. I emptied the cupboard and the refrigerator and had them marching out the door."
Next stop was the University of Vermont, where Gittelsohn pursued a parallel interest in folk and bluegrass music. "That was extracurricular," he says.
He had a radio show on the college station, WRUV, and in selecting records from the station's vast library, he stumbled upon The Cats & the Fiddle, a black jive/swing vocal quartet from the '30s and '40s who accompanied themselves on guitar, bass, and tiple. That sent Gittelsohn over the edge. He bought a tiple (an obscure, 10-string instrument) and moved to San Francisco to play on the streets.
"I did that for eight months," he says, "and then got into this trio doing Cats & the Fiddle songs. I earned my living doing that for a year."
He enrolled at San Francisco State film school, earning, he says, "about a year's worth of credits," but returned to UVM to finish his bachelor's degree in mass communication.
His first real job behind a camera was with WCAX-TV as a news videographer and editor for a year and a half. He left to teach video production at Harwood Union High School and Middle School in South Duxbury.
...
Gittelsohn found himself shooting from rooftops at two in the morning and editing with borrowed equipment when he could steal the time.
This seems an unlikely beginning for a successful company, but it was a harbinger of the varied and unusual projects VIDEOsyncracies has taken on since then.
Gittelsohn lives in Queen City Park in Burlington with his wife, Ellen, a part-time librarian who helps with marketing at VIDEOsyncracies.
Their son, Isaac, is in 10th grade, and Gittelsohn has two grown children from a previous marriage: Claire, 22, who recently graduated from UVM, and Elliott, 24, a - drum roll, please! - professional contortionist in San Francisco.
Gittelsohn collects oddball instruments like tiple, tenor banjos, and banjo-mandolins, and has played with the Onion River Dixieland Jazz Band since the '80s.
Things are changing in the video world. "Everything's being put on the Internet," he says, "and people are used to getting things for free."
Someone of a different personality might feel threatened, but Gittelsohn is taking it in stride.
You gotta have fun," says videographer ...
www.vermontguides.com, 3 Jan 2012 [cached]
You gotta have fun," says videographer Paul Gittelsohn, proprietor of VIDEOsyncracies Production & Duplication in Burlington.
Gittelsohn's characteristic expression is a wry smile, and when he's telling stories - obviously a favorite pastime - he's apt to interrupt himself and rewind his tale to the beginning so he can add a funny detail he'd forgotten.
...
Gittelsohn has spent years accumulating equipment that enables him to provide these services efficiently and with high quality. He recalls stringing VCRs together in a "daisy chain," laboriously duplicating video products five at a time.
Now, though, he has modern duplicating equipment and 25-plus years' worth of work - 24 metal drawers of DVD and CD masters; a wall 12 feet wide and 8 feet high filled with videotape masters; and 1,000 or more mini DV video tapes stored in former library card catalog boxes.
"It's my life's work," he says, "like the warehouse archives. For example, in 1991 a New York state woman with an affinity for camelids had written a book on llama and alpaca training and handling, and wanted to make an instructional video to sell as another product. She had no budget, but Gittelsohn journeyed to her farm and launched a partnership with her that has lasted through seven videos and more than 20 years.
She's still selling those videos from her website, and Gittelsohn gets 35 percent of each sale. He can reproduce them at will from the masters he has saved.
...
Primarily, though, the fun for Gittelsohn is in video production, a creative outlet that keeps him constantly learning new things as he works with his clients to figure out how to convey their specialized information. Fun does not preclude long, hard, meticulous work at editing.
"Paul is like a mad scientist," says Francis (Rich) Finigan, a sometimes resident of Randolph and the founder of Environmental Safeguard Professionals.
...
"Paul's a highly intelligent guy with a dry sense of humor that he can use to break the tension during those long hours of editing."
...
All this accessibility, and Paul was really, always, my first choice."
Since starting VIDEOsyncracies in 1987, Gittelsohn has produced hundreds of instructional, promotional, and educational videos. His projects fall into three categories: videos he is paid to produce; videos he produces on spec (llama training was one of these); and "event" videos for hire, such as a dance recitals and performances. "Never, ever, a wedding!
...
Levine shot the footage, but hired Gittelsohn for the editing.
...
"'Genius!'" Gittelsohn exclaims, "with 10 exclamation points!"
Now 54, Gittelsohn spent most of his youth in a residential neighborhood in Baltimore, but his ties to Vermont formed early. His father, Alan, was a professor of biostatistics at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, where he formed a personal and professional relationship with renowned healthcare researcher Jack Wennberg.
The Wennbergs moved to Waterbury in the mid-1960s, and the Gittelsohns began spending summers here. In the early 1970s Dr. Gittelsohn and Dr. Wennberg formed a private health-statistics office in Burlington.
...
From then on, young Gittelsohn had one foot in Baltimore and the other in Burlington. He attended high schools in both cities.
Playing with the Wennbergs' children at their 50 acres in Waterbury Center planted the seeds of Gittelsohn's future career. "Someone had a super-8 camera," he recalls. "We would make tons of corny kid films - jumping out of the barn, making chickens disappear."
In 1974, still in high school, he landed a summer job in Burlington as a projectionist for a college film study class and took a course in basic filmmaking, which gave him an opportunity to make his own movie. He elected to animate his kitchen.
"I made everything come to life," he says. "It was stop-motion animation. You take two frames, 'click-click,' then move the object a quarter of an inch and go 'click-click.' Very painstaking. The kitchen objects had a little funeral around a broken glass, and then there was a revolt. I emptied the cupboard and the refrigerator and had them marching out the door."
Next stop was the University of Vermont, where Gittelsohn pursued a parallel interest in folk and bluegrass music. "That was extracurricular," he says.
He had a radio show on the college station, WRUV, and in selecting records from the station's vast library, he stumbled upon The Cats & the Fiddle, a black jive/swing vocal quartet from the '30s and '40s who accompanied themselves on guitar, bass, and tiple. That sent Gittelsohn over the edge. He bought a tiple (an obscure, 10-string instrument) and moved to San Francisco to play on the streets.
"I did that for eight months," he says, "and then got into this trio doing Cats & the Fiddle songs. I earned my living doing that for a year."
He enrolled at San Francisco State film school, earning, he says, "about a year's worth of credits," but returned to UVM to finish his bachelor's degree in mass communication.
His first real job behind a camera was with WCAX-TV as a news videographer and editor for a year and a half. He left to teach video production at Harwood Union High School and Middle School in South Duxbury.
...
Gittelsohn found himself shooting from rooftops at two in the morning and editing with borrowed equipment when he could steal the time.
This seems an unlikely beginning for a successful company, but it was a harbinger of the varied and unusual projects VIDEOsyncracies has taken on since then.
Gittelsohn lives in Queen City Park in Burlington with his wife, Ellen, a part-time librarian who helps with marketing at VIDEOsyncracies.
Their son, Isaac, is in 10th grade, and Gittelsohn has two grown children from a previous marriage: Claire, 22, who recently graduated from UVM, and Elliott, 24, a - drum roll, please! - professional contortionist in San Francisco.
Gittelsohn collects oddball instruments like tiple, tenor banjos, and banjo-mandolins, and has played with the Onion River Dixieland Jazz Band since the '80s.
Things are changing in the video world. "Everything's being put on the Internet," he says, "and people are used to getting things for free."
Someone of a different personality might feel threatened, but Gittelsohn is taking it in stride.
...
Since the mid-1980s, Paul Gittelsohn has produced hundreds of instructional, promotional, and educational videos, duplicated CDs and DVDs, and transferred images and sound to CDs and DVDs from aging media like VHS, 8-millimeter film, and reel-to-reel audio tape. He is the owner of VIDEOsyncracies Production & Duplication in Burlington.
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