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This profile was last updated on 2/3/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Paul W. Davenport

Wrong Paul W. Davenport?
 
Background

Employment History

Education

  • Ph.D.
26 Total References
Web References
Bicycling Magazine - Powerful Lungs
www.bicycling.com, 1 Aug 2002 [cached]
But you can train your respiratory strength, says Paul Davenport, Ph.D., pulmonary researcher and professor at University of Florida in Gainesville."Conditioning the muscles that support your breathing makes it easier to take deeper breaths and thereby exchange more oxygen in your lungs."In a study of 10 healthy men and women, Davenport found that by blowing into a special "inspiratory muscle trainer" 24 breaths a day, 5 days a week for 4 weeks, the volunteers increased their respiratory muscle strength by 50 percent.That gain probably equals a performance edge of about 2 percent to 5 percent, says Davenport.
:: American Parkinson Disease Association ::Fellowship And Grants
www.apdaparkinson.org, 7 Dec 2007 [cached]
Paul Davenport, Ph.D. University of Florida
Paul ...
www.frontiersin.org, 25 July 2010 [cached]
Paul Davenport University of Florida
10NBC / WHEC TV-10
www.whec.com, 27 Jan 2004 [cached]
"So in the future where this will have great application will be in those patients that have some dysfunction either in the larynx or in the upper airway in terms of needing to have a better pressure support in order to produce the sounds that are required for communication," said Paul Davenport, PhD, physiologist, University of Florida.
Racing
www.sbclub.org, 25 Dec 2002 [cached]
But you can train your respiratory strength, says Paul Davenport, Ph.D., pulmonary researcher and professor at University of Florida in Gainesville."Conditioning the muscles that support your breathing makes it easier to take deeper breaths and thereby exchange more oxygen in your lungs."In a study of 10 healthy men and women, Davenport found that by blowing into a special "inspiratory muscle trainer" 24 breaths a day, 5 days a week for 4 weeks, the volunteers increased their respiratory muscle strength by 50 percent.That gain probably equals a performance edge of about 2 percent to 5 percent, says Davenport.
...
Even during exercise, when we need more oxygen, we tend to get it by breathing faster--huffing and puffing--not by breathing deeper, says Davenport.
Mostly, our shallow breathing is habit--it's what our body is accustomed to doing to meet our oxygen needs.We also unconsciously resist breathing deeply because, for most of us, it's less efficient, says Davenport.
...
Your body position affects how much air you can easily take in. "When you're stretched out, like on a road bike, you have a better distribution of oxygen across your lungs," says Davenport.
...
"You can achieve a small increase in performance by synchronizing your breathing to your pedal stroke," says Davenport.
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