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This profile was last updated on 3/16/11  and contains information from public web pages.

Paul A. Chromey

Wrong Paul A. Chromey?

Owner

Northeast Pedorthic Services
 
Background

Employment History

7 Total References
Web References
Paul Chromey, 56, has agreed to ...
www.timesleader.com, 16 Mar 2011 [cached]
Paul Chromey, 56, has agreed to plead guilty to theft in connection with health care.
By Terrie Morgan-Beseckertmorgan@timesleader.com Law & Order Reporter
In the latest case, (Paul) Chromey has admitted he illegally billed Medicare for $764,758 in goods.
SCRANTON - A former podiatrist has been charged with bilking Medicare out of more than $700,000 for accepting payments in connection with items for which he was not authorized to bill the insurance program.
Paul Chromey, 56, of Plains Township, has agreed to plead guilty to one count of theft in connection with health care, according to a plea agreement filed Monday in federal court.
Chromey, the owner of Northeast Pedorthic Services in Plains Township, illegally billed Medicare for diabetic shoes, inserts and other items from Jan. 1, 2006, to July 10, 2009, according to a press release issued Tuesday by U.S. Attorney Peter J. Smith.
...
Smith said Chromey had been barred from billing Medicare and all other federal health care benefit programs for a period of 10 years beginning in December 2000.
...
The press release does not say why Chromey was barred from billing Medicare, but it appears it is related to a 1999 case in which Chromey was charged with Medicare fraud.
In that case, authorities said Chromey, who served as business manager for a podiatrist who had offices in Old Forge and Exeter, billed Medicare $89,260 for services that were not performed. The podiatrist in that case was not charged with any crime.
Chromey pleaded guilty in July 1999 to one count of mail fraud in connection with that case. He was later sentenced to three years probation and ordered to pay $29,725 in restitution.
In the latest case, Chromey has admitted he illegally billed Medicare for $764,758 in goods. He has agreed to reimburse the program the full amount, with the first $100,000 to be paid at the time of his plea.
Although PTTD develops over time, the ...
www.oandpbiznews.com, 1 Aug 2008 [cached]
Although PTTD develops over time, the actual rupture will show pathological signs, said Paul A. Chromey, DPM, CPed, pedorthic educator, anatomy instructor in pedorthics at Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine in Philadelphia, and owner/operator of Northeast Pedorthic Services. When the tendon ruptures, the talus bone plantarflexes, adducts and moves anteriorly, collapsing the longitudinal arch.
“This places tremendous tension on the spring ligament,” he said.
The tension then causes the joint to abduct and the calcaneus bone to evert, resulting in a flatfoot.
It is rare, however, to have an actual spontaneous rupture on the tibialis posterior muscle, Chromey said.
...
All images reprinted with permission of Paul A. Chromey, DPM, CPed.
By the time patients enter stage three, they already have experienced considerable deformity and weakness in their feet, accompanied by significant pain, explained Erick Janisse, CO, CPed, vice president of National Pedorthic Services Inc. in St. Louis.
According to Chromey, patients in this classification will have a rigid flatfoot on the hindfoot. Radiographs in this stage show arthritic changes in the tarsal joints.
Stage 4 of PTTD — which is now severe flatfoot — signals the dysfunction’s end stage. Radiographs reveal a complete valgus collapse of the talus bone, Chromey said, possibly resulting in necrotic ulcerations along that mid-arch collapse.
...
Paul A. Chromey, DPM, CPed, pedorthic educator and instructor of cadaver lab at Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine in Philadelphia and owner/operator of Northeast Pedorthic Services in Wilkes-Barre, Pa.
Research over the years
Chromey’s research and literary review have demonstrated that PTTD dates back to discussion in the early 1970s, although the four categories were not determined until 1984 by Mueller. Johnson and Strom linked the tendon pathology to both clinical and radiograph findings 5 years later; and, in 1992, Holmes and Mann realized that more than half of patients with an adult acquired flatfoot had diabetes, hypertension or obesity, or some combination of those.
In 2004, Chromey and pedorthic alumni at Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Cadaver Lab linked PTTD incidence to patients who developed at least a one-half inch shorter leg over the course of their lifetimes.
...
Chromey follows the school of thought that as long as the foot remains flexible, the patient should be treated with a functional orthotic. In the first two stages of PTTD, the traditional orthosis controls the foot in stance phase, which indirectly stabilizes the ankle on the tibia.
Once the foot becomes rigid, however, Chromey believes it is necessary to graduate to an ankle-foot orthosis (AFO). He employs various AFOs to directly control the ankle and the tibia, assisting the foot from stance phase through swing phase.
...
Whether an orthotic or orthosis is prescribed, the treatment is only as good as the footwear that they wear, Chromey insists.
“We emphasize the proper extra-wide, extra-depth orthopedic footwear with a rocker sole,” he said.
...
Chromey and his team linked PTTD incidence to patients who developed at least a ½" shorter leg during the course of their lifetimes.
...
Practitioners should remember that treating PTTD is as easy as looking for the patients’ symptoms, Chromey said.
“We need to listen to our patients, look at the abnormal [wear patterns] on the soles of their shoes, and we need to start measuring legs to see just how much shorter they are,” he said.
Earlier this month, a federal judge ...
www.wnep.com, 27 Sept 2011 [cached]
Earlier this month, a federal judge sentenced Paul Chromey, the owner of a Plains Township orthotics footwear firm, to a year in prison for fraudulently billing Medicare. Prosecutors said when he ran the scam, in Luzerne County, he stole $750,000.
Paul Chromey, 55 a Plains ...
zalma.com, 30 Mar 2011 [cached]
Paul Chromey, 55 a Plains Township, Pennsylvania man accused of stealing from Medicare has agreed to pay back more than $700,000 as part of a plea agreement reached with federal prosecutors. Chromey was charged Monday with one count of theft in connection with health care. Chormey's plea agreement says the total loss was $764,758, but the U.S. Attorney's Office reduced the amount of the loss to just $100 for purposes of the plea, which means the charge is classified as a misdemeanor, as opposed to a felony.
The plea agreement, which was signed February 1, was filed in federal court on in March. Neither the agreement nor the charge filed against Chromey provide any details of the crime. he case marks the second time Chromey has been charged with Medicare fraud. In 1999, he was charged with fraudulently billing the federal health care fund $89,260.
Authorities said Chromey, who served as business manager for a podiatrist who had offices in Old Forge and Exeter, billed for services that were not performed. The podiatrist in that case was not charged with any crime. Chromey pleaded guilty in July 1999 to one count of mail fraud in connection with that case. He was later sentenced to three years probation and ordered to pay $29,725 in restitution.
In the latest case, the charges against Chromey say the crimes were committed between January 2006 and July 2009. The plea deal says Chromey has agreed to pay $764,758 in restitution. The first $100,000 of that sum must be paid at the time of his plea.
Paul Chromey will pay back more ...
www.timesleader.com, 15 Mar 2011 [cached]
Paul Chromey will pay back more than $700,000 as part of the agreement.
...
Paul Chromey, 55, was charged Monday with one count of theft in connection with health care. Chormey's plea agreement says the total loss was $764,758, but the U.S. Attorney's Office reduced the amount of the loss to just $100 for purposes of the plea, which means the charge is classified as a misdemeanor, as opposed to a felony.
The plea agreement, which was signed Feb. 1, was filed in federal court on Monday. Neither the agreement nor the charge filed against Chromey provide any details of the crime. The U.S. Attorney's Office did not immediately respond to request for additional information as of Monday evening.
The case marks the second time Chromey has been charged with Medicare fraud. In 1999, he was charged with fraudulently billing the federal health care fund $89,260.
Authorities said Chromey, who served as business manager for a podiatrist who had offices in Old Forge and Exeter, billed for services that were not performed. The podiatrist in that case was not charged with any crime.
Chromey pleaded guilty in July 1999 to one count of mail fraud in connection with that case. He was later sentenced to three years probation and ordered to pay $29,725 in restitution.
In the latest case, the charges against Chromey say the crimes were committed between January 2006 and July 2009. The plea deal says Chromey has agreed to pay $764,758 in restitution.
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