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Prof. Paul A. Cantor

Professor of English

University of Virginia

HQ Phone: (434) 924-3900

Email: p***@***.edu

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University of Virginia

100 Darden Blvd.

Charlottesville, Virginia 22903

United States

Company Description

The University of Virginia will unveil its new world-class squash facility on Sept. 19, and the sport's elite ranks have begun lining up to offer their seals of approval. The $12.4 million McArthur Squash Center at the Boar's Head Sports Club opened its ... more

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Background Information

Affiliations

Emeritus Member
Ashbrook Center

Member, AHI Board
Academic Advisors

Education

A.B.

Harvard University

BA

Harvard University

Ph. D.

Ph.D

Harvard University

Ph.D.

English literature

Harvard

graduate degrees

Harvard

Web References (130 Total References)


Tikvah Fellowship » Faculty

tikvahfellowship.org [cached]

Paul Cantor

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Paul Cantor
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Paul Cantor
Paul Cantor is Professor of English at the University of Virginia and author of Gilligan Unbound: Pop Culture in the Age of Globalization (2001), Creature and Creator: Myth-Making and English Romanticism (1984), and Shakespeare's Rome: Republic and Empire (1976). In addition to his study of Elizabethan and Romantic literature, Cantor has a keen interest in the Austrian school of economics and the work of Ludwig von Mises.


Paul ...

tikvahfellowship.org [cached]

Paul Cantor Tikvah Fellowship > Faculty > Paul Cantor The Tikvah Fellowship

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Paul Cantor
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Paul Cantor
Paul Cantor is Professor of English at the University of Virginia and author of Gilligan Unbound: Pop Culture in the Age of Globalization (2001), Creature and Creator: Myth-Making and English Romanticism (1984), and Shakespeare's Rome: Republic and Empire (1976). In addition to his study of Elizabethan and Romantic literature, Cantor has a keen interest in the Austrian school of economics and the work of Ludwig von Mises.


Association for Core Texts and Courses & The ACTC Liberal Arts Institute » Annual Conference

www.actc-online.org [cached]

Paul Cantor, English, University of Virginia, 2007


Paul Cantor - Conversations with Bill Kristol

conversationswithbillkristol.org [cached]

Paul Cantor

Paul A. Cantor is Clifton Waller Barrett Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Virginia, where he has taught since 1977. Cantor received his BA in 1966 and his Ph.D. in 1971 from Harvard University, where he was an assistant professor of English from 1971 to 1977. From 1992 to 1999, Cantor served on the National Council on the Humanities, the governing board of the National Endowment for the Humanities. He has published extensively on Shakespeare, including his books Shakespeare's Rome: Republic and Empire (Cornell, 1976)-which deals with Coriolanus and Antony and Cleopatra-and the Hamlet volume in the Cambridge Landmarks of World Literature series (Cambridge University Press, 1989, 2004). He has also published essays on The Merchant of Venice, Henry V, As You Like It, Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, King Lear, Timon of Athens, Antony and Cleopatra,and The Tempest, as well as on general issues of Shakespeare criticism. In addition to Shakespeare, he has written about other English Renaissance dramatists, including Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, Cyril Tourneur, and John Ford. Among the other fields he has worked in are British Romantic literature and American popular culture. His bookGilligan Unbound: Pop Culture in the Age of Globalization (Rowman & Littlefield, 2001) was named one of the best non-fiction books of 2001 by the Los Angeles Times. In the Fall of 2007 and 2012, Cantor was a Visiting Professor of Government at Harvard and taught a course on Shakespeare and Politics, which he also taught in the Spring of 2015.


I'm very glad to be joined ...

conversationswithbillkristol.org [cached]

I'm very glad to be joined today by Paul Cantor, Professor of English at the University of Virginia and a previous conversant, whatever the right term is there.

CANTOR: Great to be back. "Interlocutor."
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CANTOR: I was a little worried with just talking about books in general because there'd be an awfully long list then. I thought I'd talk about works of literature - plays, novels, some short stories - that support liberty.
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CANTOR: There is some truth to that.
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CANTOR: There were the Spanish Scholastics, the School of Salamanca, which were defending the free market. Not too many people have heard of them.
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CANTOR: It's a defense of the marketplace, the dispersal of knowledge, and the other thing that's quite amazing is that the fair - it's corrupt, but it's innocent and nobody gets hurt.
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CANTOR: There's a bit of it in The Merchant of Venice.
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CANTOR: This is very unconventional play, and it's absolutely brilliant.
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CANTOR: Next on my list is Daniel Defoe's A Journal of the Plague Year, which is the first zombie novel.
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CANTOR: It's written in 1721.
KRISTOL: He's early 18th - a whole century after Jonson.
CANTOR: He was born in 1660 so he had actually experienced the plague as a child. This is very early in the history of the novel, really. The line between fiction and nonfiction was not clearly drawn. Most people thought Robinson Crusoe was a true account when he wrote that.
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CANTOR: Particularly Defoe who was basically a Whig, although he would write for the Tory press.
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CANTOR: We're going over to Germany now.
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CANTOR: 1830s, he died in 1837.
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CANTOR: I think it was some kind of disease although evidently his health wasn't that good. We have three plays; he wrote a fourth play that has been lost.
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CANTOR: Many translations. I've seen it in London.
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CANTOR: But efforts to represent it in literature have not turned out.
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CANTOR: Even there, there are some questions about how well that was done. It's a remarkable political play. Maybe the best political play for the 19th century.
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CANTOR: Büchner did not finish it.
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CANTOR: The movie is stunning.
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CANTOR: We're going to go back to Britain now to a novel that dates to 1854, Elizabeth Gaskell's North and South.
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CANTOR: This was not lost on the men who complained about it.
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CANTOR: Being a servant or working on farms.

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