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This profile was last updated on 5/15/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. Patrick J. Kilcarr

Wrong Dr. Patrick J. Kilcarr?

Director

Local Address: Washington D.C., District of Columbia, United States
Georgetown University
LL 3700 O Street NW"
Washington Dc , District of Columbia 20057
United States

Company Description: Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) is an internationally recognized academic medical center with a three-part mission of research, teaching and patient...   more
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

Education

  • Ph.D. Vice President
  • Doctorate , Developmental and Organizational Psychology
    Prestigious Institute for Child Study
  • Doctorate , Developmental and Organizational Psychology
    University of Maryland , College Park
  • Masters , Marriage and Family Therapy
    Prestigious Institute for Child Study
58 Total References
Web References
NCGI: National Center for Gender Issues and AD/HD
www.ncgiadd.org, 1 Aug 2008 [cached]
Patrick Kilcarr, Ph.D. Vice President
For the past 14 years, Dr. Kilcarr has been Director of Georgetown University's Center for Personal Development.He received a Masters in Marriage and Family Therapy (Systems Theory) and a Doctorate in Developmental and Organizational Psychology through the Prestigious Institute for Child Study: University of Maryland, College Park.
Dr. Kilcarr presents workshops both regionally and nationally on the multiple issues affiliated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Adult Children of Alcoholics (ACOA) and Post-Secondary issues related of alcohol and other drug use.Dr. Kilcarr co-authored a critically acclaimed book with Patricia Quinn, M.D. on the relationship that exists between fathers and their sons who have ADHD titled, Voices from Fatherhood: Fathers, Son, and AD/HD.
Program for Health and Higher Education | Sumner Symposium 2002 Participants List
www.aacu.org, 14 Jan 2004 [cached]
Dr. Patrick Kilcarr, Director, Center for Personal DevelopmentGeorgetown University
Patrick Kilcarr, Ph.D. ...
shoppe.chadd.org, 18 Nov 2004 [cached]
Patrick Kilcarr, Ph.D.
For the past eight years, Dr. Kilcarr has been Director of Georgetown University's Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.He is also the founder and executive director of the Georgetown Outdoor Adventure Leadership School (GOALS).GOALS trains a select group of Georgetown students to lead group-based outdoor adventure trips as well as facilitate team building and group initiative training throughout the university and in the surrounding community.Dr. Kilcarr received a Master's degree in Marriage and Family Therapy and a Doctorate in Developmental and Organizational Psychology through the University of Maryland, College Park.Currently, Dr. Kilcarr serves as a member of the CHADD National Board of Directors.
CHADD - Officers and Board of Directors
www.chadd.org, 20 Dec 2001 [cached]
Patrick Kilcarr
...
Patrick Kilcarr, Ph.D.
For the past eight years, Patrick J. Kilcarr, Ph.D., has been Director of Georgetown University's Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.He is also the founder and executive director of the Georgetown Outdoor Adventure Leadership School (G.O.A.L.S.).The Leadership school trains a select group of Georgetown students to lead group based outdoor adventure trips as well as facilitate teambuilding and group initiative training throughout the University and in the surrounding community.
Dr. Kilcarr received a Masters in Marriage and Family Therapy and a Doctorate in Developmental and Organizational Psychology through the Prestigious Institute For Child Study: University of Maryland, College Park.While maintaining a thriving corporate consulting practice on topics ranging from facilitating focus groups to multi-day teambuilding seminars, Dr. Kilcarr also presents workshops both regionally and nationally on the multiple issues affiliated with ADHD.Recent workshops have concentrated on the developmental impact of AD/HD as related to the individual who has AD/HD, the family and, most specifically, the father.
Along with his busy training schedule and responsibilities at Georgetown University, Dr. Kilcarr recently co-authored a book with Patricia Quinn, M.D. on the relationship that exists between fathers and their sons who have AD/HD.
"It's great that your other child ...
www.additudemag.com, 28 Mar 2007 [cached]
"It's great that your other child is doing well academically, but that success doesn't make up for a lack of attention and affirmation at home," says Patrick Kilcarr, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist at Georgetown University, who has written extensively on siblings and how they are affected by disabilities within the family."Kids want to feel prized in their home," he says.When you have one exceptionally needy child, it's tough to find time for your other kids.But Kilcarr believes parents should regularly evaluate the quantity and quality of time spent with the non-AD/HD child.
Here are some suggestions for making every moment count:
GIVE THE GIFT OF TIME.Set aside an hour or two after work or on the weekend to bond with your child, by taking a walk, going to an amusement park, or having dinner out.Attending her dance recital or soccer game, although important, doesn't qualify as bonding.Kilcarr, who's the father of two children with AD/HD, promises that spending time together is a powerful stress reliever for the parent and a benefit for the child.
...
Kilcarr does, however, caution against setting up an "us versus them" dynamic.It's fine for your child to express negative feelings about her brother or sister, but it shouldn't turn into a gripe session, with the AD/HD child as the target.
...
"A child who's out of control shouldn't be tolerated," says Kilcarr.With the success of medications in treating AD/HD, as well as behavior therapy, there's no reason that a child with this condition can't be held accountable."It's important that the sibling feel like he or she is in a safe, protected environment," adds Kilcarr.
TRY THIS: In his own household, Kilcarr has instituted a "no hands, no feet" rule, which stipulates that you're not allowed to touch your siblings unless they request, say, a hug.Once in place, there must be consistent (the magic word for kids with AD/HD) consequences if the rule is broken, such as immediate time-outs.
TEACH YOUR CHILD TO BE ASSERTIVE.Training a child to stand up for herself doesn't replace the parent's duty to protect her, but it empowers the child in difficult situations.Kilcarr creates cues in the home: The family discusses actions that aren't acceptable and comes up with a sign-holding up an index finger, for example-to signal that a bad behavior is about to, or has already begun to, happen.If your AD/HD child is starting to break a rule, his sibling can raise her index finger to let him know that he's about to get into trouble.She's taking control of the situation, and also helping her sibling avoid a time-out.
TRY THIS: Explain to siblings what's realistic to expect from a brother or sister-and have the AD/HD child follow the rules and take on chores and other responsibilities to the best of his ability.Rules should be consistent for all the kids in a household.
Remember, too, that sometimes the most unexpected (and unapparent) things can lie at the heart of your other child's anxiety.She may be embarrassed to invite her friends over for fear that her AD/HD sibling will act up.She might even worry about you.Kilcarr recalls a session with a father and a daughter in which he asked the girl to talk about what caused her the most tension at home.To the family's surprise, it wasn't her AD/HD sibling, but rather the fact that her dad had started drinking because of all the stress at home.
The moral of the story?
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