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Wrong Patricia deGogorza?

Patricia deGogorza

Teacher

University of Vermont

HQ Phone:  (802) 847-8200

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

University of Vermont

111 Colchester Avenue

Burlington, Vermont,05401

United States

Company Description

We are the tertiary referral center for Vermont, areas of New Hampshire, and upstate New York. Our patients represent the entire range of socioeconomic diversity and we serve large refugee populations from Africa, Eastern Europe, Southeast Asia, and the Balkan...more

Web References(1 Total References)


Times Argus

www.timesargus.com [cached]

Patricia deGogorza: Master of contradictionsTimes ArgusPatricia deGogorza: Master of contradictions"Patricia deGogorza: Sculptures for a New Year" is on view at the Julian Scott Memorial Gallery at the Dibden Center for the Arts at Johnson State College through Feb. 5.Patricia deGogorza's magnificent wooden sculptures are full of contradictions.The forms seem simple, but they're really sophisticated multi-faceted objects.Her carving isn't fussy or overpolished, and yet the sculptures are beautifully made.The shapes tend toward abstraction, but they often include the most difficult sort of representational imagery - variations on the human face.All this is to say, deGogorza is a master of the medium, and for the first time in years she has embarked on not just one but two, almost simultaneous solo exhibitions.She is showing her work at a private gallery in Northampton, Mass., this month, and there is an extensive display of her sculptures, monoprints, charcoal sketches and watercolors at Johnson State College through Feb. 5.DeGogorza is a pioneering Vermont artist and teacher who has had an incalculable impact on the state's art scene.Her first visual language was printmaking, and she began making her bold rough-hewn forms when she came to Vermont in 1964 with her husband, abstract expressionist James Gahagan.The pair founded their own fine art school in the early 1970s, which lasted about three years.Afterward, Gahagan and deGogorza continued to exert their influence on Vermont artists, Gahagan as chair of the art department at Goddard College, and deGogorza as a teacher at the Vermont Studio Center, Goddard College, the University of Vermont, Studio Place Arts, and the Carving Studio & Sculpture Center.Afterward, Gahagan and deGogorza continued to exert their influence on Vermont artists, Gahagan as chair of the art department at Goddard College, and deGogorza as a teacher at the Vermont Studio Center, Goddard College, the University of Vermont, Studio Place Arts, and the Carving Studio & Sculpture Center."I do sculpture to find things out, not to assert things," deGogorza says.But like all of deGogorza's sculptures, there isn't a front and back to the form, merely a front and a front."Art is almost an abstraction, and it has references, too," DeGogorza says.In another departure from convention, deGogorza often paints her sculptures as a way of manipulating planes, often using color to create optical illusions that enhance aspects of a given piece.She sees the colored portions of a sculpture as separate planes.She also creates voids in large sculptures that serve the same purpose: they deceive the eye into thinking that a hole or negative space is a part of the sculpture.DeGogorza is so confident in her work that these experiments are masterfully executed - part of her sensual rather than cerebral artistic vision.


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