Share This Profile
Share this profile on Facebook.
Link to this profile on LinkedIn.
Tweet this profile on Twitter.
Email a link to this profile.
See other services through which you can share this profile.
This profile was last updated on 4/20/13  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Patricia Greenberg

Wrong Patricia Greenberg?

Owner

Local Address: Los Angeles, California, United States
The Fitness Gourmet
 
Background

Employment History

Education

  • bachelor's degree , nutrition and food science
  • BS , Nutrition
51 Total References
Web References
For those of you who want ...
www.thefitnessgourmet.com [cached]
For those of you who want more than recipes from a cookbook, author Patricia Greenberg provides suggestions for getting the optimum nutrition from soy following today's accepted standards for a healthy diet.
...
Greenberg also incorporates the use of meat and dairy substitutes in many of the recipes such as Soy Sausage Rolls, Soy Sausage Tortilla Pizzas, Soy Sloppy Joes, Country Soy Sausage Stew, and Soy Meatloaf.
...
by Patricia Greenberg
...
Patricia Greenberg explains the many healthful benefits of soy and reveals how even the most decadent of desserts can be turned into a healthy treat using nature's healthiest bean.
...
Patricia Greenberg
...
Patricia Greenberg, a nutritionist and chef who serves as spokeswomen for the association, relayed some advice for soy virgins and aficionados alike.
Rule #1: Just try it. Pick your favorite recipe and try swapping in tofu for half the protein, Greenberg said. Spaghetti and meatballs? Proceed as usual, but sub in "ground round" soy substitute for half the ground meat.
Rule #2: Think sweet, think soy. If you're making a pudding, smoothie or milkshake and you want to eliminate some of the milk, yogurt or ice cream, puree some tofu in the blender first and then add the additional ingredients. But choose which style of tofu you use carefully. "When you're doing sweet desserts, custards, desserts, use silken tofu," Greenberg said.
...
Many people think tofu tastes bad and that its texture is unappealing, Greenberg said.
...
Patricia Greenberg is not one of those people.
...
"Each time I do one, I say I'll do one more and then I'm done, but I just keep going," Greenberg said. "I've actually gotten faster, stronger, more adept at what I do. And as a nutrition teacher, I've put a tremendous amount of research into all the different components that go into it. So I've been able to keep it up all these years, with the same enthusiasm I might add."
Greenberg is an ACE- (American Council on Exercise) certified trainer, a certified culinary professional with the International Association of Culinary Arts, and has a bachelor's degree in nutrition and food science.
Combining her training, she runs The Fitness Gourmet - an education consulting firm that presents nutrition and fitness seminars nationwide.
...
Generally, for first-time marathon runners, Greenberg suggests a training program that starts out with 3- to 5-mile runs four days a week and adding mileage as you go.
"About three or four weeks out (from) the marathon, you should do a 20-mile run. ... We consider that to be a significant run and a good training run for a full marathon," Greenberg said "People who do a full marathon prior to the (actual) marathon are too tired and too wiped out and become somewhat injury prone," she said. "So it's best not to do - especially for a beginner - the full mileage before you get to the marathon. Greenberg also recommends the marathon-training regimen include cross-training such as cycling, swimming or weight training, to avoid overworking specific parts of the body.
Closer to the run: Two weeks prior to the race, Greenberg recommends runners start to bulk up nutritionally with an increase in complex carbohydrates, including whole grain bread, pasta salad, sweet potatoes, rice and whole fruits.
"Refrain or have minimal amounts of alcohol because, contrary to popular belief, it is good for you but it does make you a little sluggish, and you don't want anything that will make you even more tired two weeks out," Greenberg said.
"If you are accustomed to drinking coffee or any kind of stimulants, then you can continue," she said. "If it's not something you're accustomed to, I wouldn't take it up for the sake of energy because you might not react well to it on the day of the race."
Two weeks out from the race is also when runners tend to partake in what Greenberg compares to holiday eating. She says people tend to overeat because they rationalize that they will burn it off during the run, but they actually gain weight instead.
Also in the weeks leading up to the marathon, Greenberg says sleep becomes an important issue. "Wherever you can get sleep in, that's critical, because sleep deprivation will slow your metabolism down, which in turn will slow your energy down," Greenberg said. "Even if you are not fully asleep, you're resting. That's a critical, critical part of the success of the marathon and of course keeping you from feeling really wiped out the day of. That also contributes to dehydration - not enough sleep."
One week to go: For the week of the Sunday race, Greenberg offers these tips:
...
"I wouldn't do any hard workout Friday and Saturday before the race, of any sort," Greenberg said. "You know when you push yourself a little too much at the gym and you get a muscle ache or a sore? It's exacerbated during the run. You feel it 10 times more when you're in the middle of a race, especially with that degree of mileage, if you've done something a little tough on Friday or Saturday."
Race day: On the day of the race, Greenberg again says to eat a breakfast you are accustomed to, though she recommends light granola, yogurt, fresh fruit, hard-boiled eggs or instant oatmeal.
Throughout the marathon, sponsors will provide water, sports drinks, snacks and medical assistance, so it's not necessary for runners to carry anything with them during the race. "While you're running, it is important also to keep yourself hydrated," Greenberg said. "You don't have to stop at every single water station. I understand why people do that, but the more you stop and start and stop and start, that really will drain your energy. So I like to recommend taking it easy the first couple miles and maybe stopping at every other water and energy-drink station."
Once you stop at a station, she says, it is important to keep walking as you sip your drink. One big mistake people make, including herself, Greenberg says, is starting out at too fast of a pace, because then you wear yourself out quickly. She recommends starting out with a 10- to 12-minute mile and then working your way up to your goal pace.
She also wants first-time runners to know that it is OK to walk the race and that there is nothing to feel ashamed about.
"For anybody running their first marathon, you're a winner just for doing it. The accomplishment alone is phenomenal," Greenberg said. "Do what's good for you and remember that you will get to the end and you will be fine. ... Just do it for yourself."
Find out more
For more information on the LA Marathon, go towww.lamarathon.com. To learn more about Patricia Greenberg, go towww.thefitnessgourmet.com.
...
By Patricia Greenberg
...
Health and wellness expert and best-selling author Patricia Greenberg has completed 11 marathons and 30 half-marathons. She is president of The Fitness Gourmet, an education consulting firm that specializes in teaching nutrition and fitness programs nationwide. For more information, www.TheFitnessGourmet.com. Patricia is also running in the Ventura Marathon.
...
Greenberg has completed 11 marathons and 29 half marathons do not add up until much later in life, said the marathon runner. “I look at staying fit and eating well as preventative medicine. The fear of aging is very valid, but what’s the alternative?†she muses. So, while turning 50 may be traumatic for some, “I was just so happy,†she said of her recent birthday. “My husband and I looked at each other and said ‘we’re so thankful that we’re healthy.’â€
...
For a tour of the nibbles table, I approached Patricia Greenberg, a chef and cookbook author (example, “The Whole Soy Cookbookâ€) who assists the organization with menu planning and recipes, including this special event.
...
And for dessert, a multi-tiered tray held aloft coin-size chocolate chip cookies with soy nuts. “They have more oomph than walnuts and pecans,†said Greenberg.
...
"What's really important is to understand what the child likes, combined with what's good for them," said nutritionist Patricia Greenberg, also known as The Fitness Gourmet.
Greenberg said it takes some planning, but one of the best ways to start is to make them part of the process.
"It's just so much simpler, I know, to throw it in the bag, but what I do is I try to give her some time ahead, we sit at the kitchen table," Greenberg said.
...
Same with chips," Greenberg said.
Containers with durable fruit, whole grain carbs are best, and sugar wise, even kids need to drink responsibly by using a 50-50 mix of juice, lemonade or sports beverage with water.
"She gets a nice little flavor and enjoys it, but the caloric level isn't too high and the sugars not too high," Greenberg said.
...
"For children who aren't hungry in the morning, I like to do to-go foods that are fun, nutritious and easy for them to eat," Greenberg said.
...
"Everyone in the family in our house participates in meal planning for that reason," Green
For those of you who want ...
www.thefitnessgourmet.com [cached]
For those of you who want more than recipes from a cookbook, author Patricia Greenberg provides suggestions for getting the optimum nutrition from soy following today's accepted standards for a healthy diet.
...
Greenberg also incorporates the use of meat and dairy substitutes in many of the recipes such as Soy Sausage Rolls, Soy Sausage Tortilla Pizzas, Soy Sloppy Joes, Country Soy Sausage Stew, and Soy Meatloaf.
...
by Patricia Greenberg
...
Patricia Greenberg explains the many healthful benefits of soy and reveals how even the most decadent of desserts can be turned into a healthy treat using nature's healthiest bean.
...
Patricia Greenberg
...
"What's really important is to understand what the child likes, combined with what's good for them," said nutritionist Patricia Greenberg, also known as The Fitness Gourmet.
Greenberg said it takes some planning, but one of the best ways to start is to make them part of the process.
"It's just so much simpler, I know, to throw it in the bag, but what I do is I try to give her some time ahead, we sit at the kitchen table," Greenberg said.
Get ready to cut produce, spread toppings and count snacks to avoid portion distortion.
"If the pretzel bag said 10 pretzels per portion, we count out the 10 pretzels and put it in her bag. Same with chips," Greenberg said.
Containers with durable fruit, whole grain carbs are best, and sugar wise, even kids need to drink responsibly by using a 50-50 mix of juice, lemonade or sports beverage with water.
"She gets a nice little flavor and enjoys it, but the caloric level isn't too high and the sugars not too high," Greenberg said.
Another fun idea is to pour juice in ice cube trays. Put a handful in with cold water, and by lunch, the 50-50 drink is ready to go.
"For children who aren't hungry in the morning, I like to do to-go foods that are fun, nutritious and easy for them to eat," Greenberg said.
...
"Everyone in the family in our house participates in meal planning for that reason," Greenberg said.
...
Patricia Greenberg, a nutritionist and chef who serves as spokeswomen for the association, relayed some advice for soy virgins and aficionados alike.
Rule #1: Just try it. Pick your favorite recipe and try swapping in tofu for half the protein, Greenberg said. Spaghetti and meatballs? Proceed as usual, but sub in "ground round" soy substitute for half the ground meat.
Rule #2: Think sweet, think soy. If you're making a pudding, smoothie or milkshake and you want to eliminate some of the milk, yogurt or ice cream, puree some tofu in the blender first and then add the additional ingredients. But choose which style of tofu you use carefully. "When you're doing sweet desserts, custards, desserts, use silken tofu," Greenberg said.
...
Many people think tofu tastes bad and that its texture is unappealing, Greenberg said.
...
Patricia Greenberg is not one of those people.
...
"Each time I do one, I say I'll do one more and then I'm done, but I just keep going," Greenberg said. "I've actually gotten faster, stronger, more adept at what I do. And as a nutrition teacher, I've put a tremendous amount of research into all the different components that go into it. So I've been able to keep it up all these years, with the same enthusiasm I might add."
Greenberg is an ACE- (American Council on Exercise) certified trainer, a certified culinary professional with the International Association of Culinary Arts, and has a bachelor's degree in nutrition and food science.
Combining her training, she runs The Fitness Gourmet - an education consulting firm that presents nutrition and fitness seminars nationwide.
...
Generally, for first-time marathon runners, Greenberg suggests a training program that starts out with 3- to 5-mile runs four days a week and adding mileage as you go.
"About three or four weeks out (from) the marathon, you should do a 20-mile run. ... We consider that to be a significant run and a good training run for a full marathon," Greenberg said "People who do a full marathon prior to the (actual) marathon are too tired and too wiped out and become somewhat injury prone," she said. "So it's best not to do - especially for a beginner - the full mileage before you get to the marathon. Greenberg also recommends the marathon-training regimen include cross-training such as cycling, swimming or weight training, to avoid overworking specific parts of the body.
Closer to the run: Two weeks prior to the race, Greenberg recommends runners start to bulk up nutritionally with an increase in complex carbohydrates, including whole grain bread, pasta salad, sweet potatoes, rice and whole fruits.
"Refrain or have minimal amounts of alcohol because, contrary to popular belief, it is good for you but it does make you a little sluggish, and you don't want anything that will make you even more tired two weeks out," Greenberg said.
"If you are accustomed to drinking coffee or any kind of stimulants, then you can continue," she said. "If it's not something you're accustomed to, I wouldn't take it up for the sake of energy because you might not react well to it on the day of the race."
Two weeks out from the race is also when runners tend to partake in what Greenberg compares to holiday eating. She says people tend to overeat because they rationalize that they will burn it off during the run, but they actually gain weight instead.
Also in the weeks leading up to the marathon, Greenberg says sleep becomes an important issue. "Wherever you can get sleep in, that's critical, because sleep deprivation will slow your metabolism down, which in turn will slow your energy down," Greenberg said. "Even if you are not fully asleep, you're resting. That's a critical, critical part of the success of the marathon and of course keeping you from feeling really wiped out the day of. That also contributes to dehydration - not enough sleep."
One week to go: For the week of the Sunday race, Greenberg offers these tips:
...
"I wouldn't do any hard workout Friday and Saturday before the race, of any sort," Greenberg said. "You know when you push yourself a little too much at the gym and you get a muscle ache or a sore? It's exacerbated during the run. You feel it 10 times more when you're in the middle of a race, especially with that degree of mileage, if you've done something a little tough on Friday or Saturday."
Race day: On the day of the race, Greenberg again says to eat a breakfast you are accustomed to, though she recommends light granola, yogurt, fresh fruit, hard-boiled eggs or instant oatmeal.
Throughout the marathon, sponsors will provide water, sports drinks, snacks and medical assistance, so it's not necessary for runners to carry anything with them during the race. "While you're running, it is important also to keep yourself hydrated," Greenberg said. "You don't have to stop at every single water station. I understand why people do that, but the more you stop and start and stop and start, that really will drain your energy. So I like to recommend taking it easy the first couple miles and maybe stopping at every other water and energy-drink station."
Once you stop at a station, she says, it is important to keep walking as you sip your drink. One big mistake people make, including herself, Greenberg says, is starting out at too fast of a pace, because then you wear yourself out quickly. She recommends starting out with a 10- to 12-minute mile and then working your way up to your goal pace.
She also wants first-time runners to know that it is OK to walk the race and that there is nothing to feel ashamed about.
"For anybody running their first marathon, you're a winner just for doing it. The accomplishment alone is phenomenal," Greenberg said. "Do what's good for you and remember that you will get to the end and you will be fine. ... Just do it for yourself."
Find out more
For more information on the LA Marathon, go towww.lamarathon.com. To learn more about Patricia Greenberg, go towww.thefitnessgourmet.com.
Ventura County Reporter, February 2011
Nutrition Tips for the Ventura half-marathon and 5K By Patricia Greenberg
...
Health and wellness expert and best-selling author Patricia Greenberg has completed 11 marathons and 30 half-marathons. She is president of The Fitness Gourmet, an education consulting firm that specializes in teaching nutrition and fitness programs nationwide. For more information, www.TheFitnessGourmet.com. Patricia is also running in the Ventura Marathon.
...
Greenberg has completed 11 marathons and 29 half marathons do not add up until much later in life, said the marathon runner.
...
For a tour of the nibbles table, I approached Patricia Greenberg, a chef and cookbook author (example, "The Whole Soy Cookbook") who assists the organization with menu planning and recipes, including this special event. The 50-year-old Los Angeleno with flawless skin, shiny hair and a marathon runner's physique starte
Patricia Greenberg, a ...
www.thefitnessgourmet.com [cached]
Patricia Greenberg, a nutritionist and chef who serves as spokeswomen for the association, relayed some advice for soy virgins and aficionados alike.
Rule #1: Just try it. Pick your favorite recipe and try swapping in tofu for half the protein, Greenberg said. Spaghetti and meatballs? Proceed as usual, but sub in "ground round" soy substitute for half the ground meat.
Rule #2: Think sweet, think soy. If you're making a pudding, smoothie or milkshake and you want to eliminate some of the milk, yogurt or ice cream, puree some tofu in the blender first and then add the additional ingredients. But choose which style of tofu you use carefully. "When you're doing sweet desserts, custards, desserts, use silken tofu," Greenberg said.
...
Many people think tofu tastes bad and that its texture is unappealing, Greenberg said.
...
Patricia Greenberg is not one of those people.
...
"Each time I do one, I say I'll do one more and then I'm done, but I just keep going," Greenberg said. "I've actually gotten faster, stronger, more adept at what I do. And as a nutrition teacher, I've put a tremendous amount of research into all the different components that go into it. So I've been able to keep it up all these years, with the same enthusiasm I might add."
Greenberg is an ACE- (American Council on Exercise) certified trainer, a certified culinary professional with the International Association of Culinary Arts, and has a bachelor's degree in nutrition and food science.
Combining her training, she runs The Fitness Gourmet - an education consulting firm that presents nutrition and fitness seminars nationwide.
...
Generally, for first-time marathon runners, Greenberg suggests a training program that starts out with 3- to 5-mile runs four days a week and adding mileage as you go.
"About three or four weeks out (from) the marathon, you should do a 20-mile run. ... We consider that to be a significant run and a good training run for a full marathon," Greenberg said "People who do a full marathon prior to the (actual) marathon are too tired and too wiped out and become somewhat injury prone," she said. "So it's best not to do - especially for a beginner - the full mileage before you get to the marathon. Greenberg also recommends the marathon-training regimen include cross-training such as cycling, swimming or weight training, to avoid overworking specific parts of the body.
Closer to the run: Two weeks prior to the race, Greenberg recommends runners start to bulk up nutritionally with an increase in complex carbohydrates, including whole grain bread, pasta salad, sweet potatoes, rice and whole fruits.
"Refrain or have minimal amounts of alcohol because, contrary to popular belief, it is good for you but it does make you a little sluggish, and you don't want anything that will make you even more tired two weeks out," Greenberg said.
"If you are accustomed to drinking coffee or any kind of stimulants, then you can continue," she said. "If it's not something you're accustomed to, I wouldn't take it up for the sake of energy because you might not react well to it on the day of the race."
Two weeks out from the race is also when runners tend to partake in what Greenberg compares to holiday eating. She says people tend to overeat because they rationalize that they will burn it off during the run, but they actually gain weight instead.
Also in the weeks leading up to the marathon, Greenberg says sleep becomes an important issue. "Wherever you can get sleep in, that's critical, because sleep deprivation will slow your metabolism down, which in turn will slow your energy down," Greenberg said. "Even if you are not fully asleep, you're resting. That's a critical, critical part of the success of the marathon and of course keeping you from feeling really wiped out the day of. That also contributes to dehydration - not enough sleep."
One week to go: For the week of the Sunday race, Greenberg offers these tips:
...
"I wouldn't do any hard workout Friday and Saturday before the race, of any sort," Greenberg said. "You know when you push yourself a little too much at the gym and you get a muscle ache or a sore? It's exacerbated during the run. You feel it 10 times more when you're in the middle of a race, especially with that degree of mileage, if you've done something a little tough on Friday or Saturday."
Race day: On the day of the race, Greenberg again says to eat a breakfast you are accustomed to, though she recommends light granola, yogurt, fresh fruit, hard-boiled eggs or instant oatmeal.
Throughout the marathon, sponsors will provide water, sports drinks, snacks and medical assistance, so it's not necessary for runners to carry anything with them during the race. "While you're running, it is important also to keep yourself hydrated," Greenberg said. "You don't have to stop at every single water station. I understand why people do that, but the more you stop and start and stop and start, that really will drain your energy. So I like to recommend taking it easy the first couple miles and maybe stopping at every other water and energy-drink station."
Once you stop at a station, she says, it is important to keep walking as you sip your drink. One big mistake people make, including herself, Greenberg says, is starting out at too fast of a pace, because then you wear yourself out quickly. She recommends starting out with a 10- to 12-minute mile and then working your way up to your goal pace.
She also wants first-time runners to know that it is OK to walk the race and that there is nothing to feel ashamed about.
"For anybody running their first marathon, you're a winner just for doing it. The accomplishment alone is phenomenal," Greenberg said. "Do what's good for you and remember that you will get to the end and you will be fine. ... Just do it for yourself."
Find out more
For more information on the LA Marathon, go towww.lamarathon.com. To learn more about Patricia Greenberg, go towww.thefitnessgourmet.com.
Ventura County Reporter, February 2011
Nutrition Tips for the Ventura half-marathon and 5K By Patricia Greenberg
...
Health and wellness expert and best-selling author Patricia Greenberg has completed 11 marathons and 30 half-marathons. She is president of The Fitness Gourmet, an education consulting firm that specializes in teaching nutrition and fitness programs nationwide. For more information, www.TheFitnessGourmet.com. Patricia is also running in the Ventura Marathon.
...
Greenberg has completed 11 marathons and 29 half marathons do not add up until much later in life, said the marathon runner.
...
For a tour of the nibbles table, I approached Patricia Greenberg, a chef and cookbook author (example, "The Whole Soy Cookbook") who assists the organization with menu planning and recipes, including this special event. The 50-year-old Los Angeleno with flawless skin, shiny hair and a marathon runner's physique started from the left corner of the buffet, opposite the two-piece orchestra.
Pointing to a metal tray where meatballs bobbed in tomato sauce, she explained that the golfball-size orbs were half soy sausage, half real beef. "The 50/50 is a nice way to introduce soy" to non-soy eaters, said Greenberg, who suggested tossing the meatballs on spaghetti, in casseroles or between two halves of a sandwich roll and calling it a sloppy Joe.
She then moved on to a medley of aromatic basmati and wild rices mixed with steamed edamame, dried apricots and cranberries, and a drizzle of citrus vinaigrette. My heart felt healthier just looking at it. Fruit kabobs were paired with a soy yogurt spread, and in the spirit of DIY food, a make-your-own taco stand featured seasoned textured vegetable protein (TVP) chicken, soy sour cream and salsa, where a stray piece of shredded soy cheddar had jumped bowls. To save the group from washing one more dish, a dip of whipped tofu, red bell peppers and pimentos nestled inside a hollowed-out loaf of pumpernickel. And for dessert, a multi-tiered tray held aloft coin-size chocolate chip cookies with soy nuts. "They have more oomph than walnuts and pecans," said Greenberg.
Fitness Gourmet
www.thefitnessgourmet.com, 8 April 2009 [cached]
Patricia Greenberg, The Fitness Gourmet
Patricia Greenberg, Certified Culinary Professional, has 20 years of experience as a nutritionist and chef, who promotes wellness through food and fitness. She has a BS in Nutrition, a degree in Culinary Arts, and recently became an ACE Certified Trainer and Weight management Consultant. She runs the Fitness Gourmet, an education consulting firm that specializes in teaching nutrition and fitness seminars nationwide., and a 6 week nutrition and fitness makeover program in Los Angeles. She has a special interest in enhancing the education of the general public, providing accurate nutrition and health information to today's consumer. You can also hear Patricia Greenberg every Wednesday night at 6:30 PM, hosting a weekly radio show called The Fitness Gourmet on KSCN, 88.5 FM at Cal State Northridge, Los Angeles. She is married and has one daughter.
Patricia appeared on KABC on July 23, 2008 to speak about cost cutting measures to save money. Watch the video here.
Patricia Greenberg, the ...
www.thefitnessgourmet.com, 11 July 2006 [cached]
Patricia Greenberg, the Fitness Gourmet:
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , a Certified Culinary Professional with the IACP, has 20 years of experience as a nutritionist and chef, who promotes wellness through food and fitness. he has a BS in Nutrition, a degree in Culinary Arts, and is an ACE Certified Personal trainer.
She runs the Fitness Gourmet, an education consulting firm that specializes in teaching nutrition and fitness seminars nationwide. She has a special interest in enhancing the education of the general public, providing accurate nutrition and health information to today's consumer.
As a best selling cookbook author, host of anationally televised PBS series, and a frequent contributor of nutrition information on both television and radio programs in Los Angeles, she has had a impact on the lives and health of thousands of people.
A woman who practices what she preaches, Patricia is a working wife and mother who follows a rigorous fitness regime. Patricia believes that eating well, and regular fitness is the key to longevity. She has completed 12 marathons, and 41 half marathons, all over the age of 35.
Other People with the name "Greenberg":
Other ZoomInfo Searches
Accelerate your business with the industry's most comprehensive profiles on business people and companies.
Find business contacts by city, industry and title. Our B2B directory has just-verified and in-depth profiles, plus the market's top tools for searching, targeting and tracking.
Atlanta | Boston | Chicago | Houston | Los Angeles | New York
Browse ZoomInfo's business people directory. Our professional profiles include verified contact information, biography, work history, affiliations and more.
Browse ZoomInfo's company directory. Our company profiles include corporate background information, detailed descriptions, and links to comprehensive employee profiles with verified contact information.
zirhbt201304