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Nurit Kalderon

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Background Information

Employment History

Lead Researcher

Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research


Lead Researcher


Web References(12 Total References)


www.aarogya.com

"This research opens the door to developing a clinical protocol for curing human spinal cord injuries using conventional therapies," said lead researcher Nurit Kalderon, Ph.D. Conducted at Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research in New York City, the research was supported by a grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).The hallmark of spinal cord injury is progressive tissue decay at the damage size.Kalderon's previous research indicated that the spinal cord is able to repair itself in the early days after injury but is thwarted in its efforts during the second or third week by certain cells that block the repair process. In earlier research on rats with cords that were completely severed, Kalderon was able to show that radiation therapy, similar to that used in cancer treatment, given localized at the lesion site during the third week following injury helped the spinal cord heal itself by eliminating the cells that interfere with its natural repair processes. Kalderon and her colleagues at Sloan-Kettering then made longitudinal micro-incisions down the centre of the injured cord within the first 24 hours after injury to release the fluid build-up."This research provides hope for spinal cord injury victims that paralysis can indeed be prevented or repaired with a combination of conventional therapies at the time of injury," said Kalderon.


www.eurekalert.org

Contact: Nurit Kalderonkalderon@spinalcordcure.org212-564-9498Public Library of Science "This research opens the door to developing a clinical protocol for curing human spinal cord injuries using conventional therapies," said lead researcher Nurit Kalderon, Ph.D. Conducted at Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research in New York City, the research was supported by a grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).The hallmark of spinal cord injury is progressive tissue decay at the damage size.Kalderon's previous research indicated that the spinal cord is able to repair itself in the early days after injury but is thwarted in its efforts during the second or third week by certain cells that block the repair process. In earlier research on rats with cords that were completely severed, Kalderon was able to show that radiation therapy, similar to that used in cancer treatment, given localized at the lesion site during the third week following injury helped the spinal cord heal itself by eliminating the cells that interfere with its natural repair processes.Kalderon and her colleagues at Sloan-Kettering then made longitudinal micro-incisions down the center of the injured cord within the first 24 hours after injury to release the fluid buildup."This research provides hope for spinal cord injury victims that paralysis can indeed be prevented or repaired with a combination of conventional therapies at the time of injury," according to Kalderon. The research was conducted at Sloan-Kettering Institute by Nurit Kalderon, Manickam Muruganandham, Jason A. Koutcher and Melissa Potuzac.Kalderon is currently with the Spinal Cord Injury Repair Laboratory in New York City, Muruganandham is with the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, and Potuzak is with the University of Pennsylvania."Therapeutic Strategy for Acute Spinal Cord Contusion Injury: Cell Elimination Combined with Microsurgical Intervention," published July 18, 2007 in PLoS ONE can be found online at www.plosone.org.Contact:Nurit Kalderon (corresponding author)Tel: +1 (212) 564-9498Email: kalderon@spinalcordcure.org Citation: Kalderon N, Muruganandham M, Koutcher JA, Potuzak M (2007) Therapeutic Strategy for Acute Spinal Cord Contusion Injury: Cell Elimination Combined with Microsurgical Intervention.PLoS ONE 2(7): e565. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0000565


animedream.org

"This research opens the door to developing a clinical protocol for curing human spinal cord injuries using conventional therapies," said lead researcher Nurit Kalderon, Ph.D. Conducted at Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research in New York City, the research was supported by a grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).
The hallmark of spinal cord injury is progressive tissue decay at the damage size. Kalderon's previous research indicated that the spinal cord is able to repair itself in the early days after injury but is thwarted in its efforts during the second or third week by certain cells that block the repair process. In earlier research on rats with cords that were completely severed, Kalderon was able to show that radiation therapy, similar to that used in cancer treatment, given localized at the lesion site during the third week following injury helped the spinal cord heal itself by eliminating the cells that interfere with its natural repair processes. Kalderon and her colleagues at Sloan-Kettering then made longitudinal micro-incisions down the center of the injured cord within the first 24 hours after injury to release the fluid buildup. "This research provides hope for spinal cord injury victims that paralysis can indeed be prevented or repaired with a combination of conventional therapies at the time of injury," according to Kalderon. The research was conducted at Sloan-Kettering Institute by Nurit Kalderon, Manickam Muruganandham, Jason A. Koutcher and Melissa Potuzac. Kalderon is currently with the Spinal Cord Injury Repair Laboratory in New York City, Muruganandham is with the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, and Potuzak is with the University of Pennsylvania. "Therapeutic Strategy for Acute Spinal Cord Contusion Injury: Cell Elimination Combined with Microsurgical Intervention," published July 18, 2007 in PLoS ONE can be found online at plosone. Source: Nurit Kalderon (corresponding author) Public Library of Science Posted inUncategorized | Leave a reply


www.nrrfr.com

This research opens the door to developing a clinical protocol for curing human spinal cord injuries using conventional therapies, said lead researcher Nurit Kalderon, Ph.D. Conducted at Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research in New York City, the research was supported by a grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).The hallmark of spinal cord injury is progressive tissue decay at the damage size.Kalderon's previous research indicated that the spinal cord is able to repair itself in the early days after injury but is thwarted in its efforts during the second or third week by certain cells that block the repair process. In earlier research on rats with cords that were completely severed, Kalderon was able to show that radiation therapy, similar to that used in cancer treatment, given localized at the lesion site during the third week following injury helped the spinal cord heal itself by eliminating the cells that interfere with its natural repair processes.Kalderon and her colleagues at Sloan-Kettering then made longitudinal micro-incisions down the center of the injured cord within the first 24 hours after injury to release the fluid buildup.This research provides hope for spinal cord injury victims that paralysis can indeed be prevented or repaired with a combination of conventional therapies at the time of injury, according to Kalderon.


www.grc.org [cached]

Nurit Kalderon (Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research)


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