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This profile was last updated on 7/20/2016 and contains contributions from the  Zoominfo Community.

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Wrong Nicolas Berryessa?

Nicolas Berryessa

Internal Medicine Specialist

Blue Pearl Georgia Veterinary Specialists

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Employment History

Clinical Instructor - Small Animal Internal Medicine

Iowa State University


Small Animal Internal Medicine Resident

University of California , Davis


Intern

Georgia Veterinary Specialists


Web References(9 Total References)


GVS Home Page

www.gvsvets.com [cached]

Nicolas Berryessa, DVM, ACVIM | Mark Dorfman, DVM, MS, ACVIM | Derek Duval, VMD, ACVIM | Lisa Langs, DVM, ACVIM | Meri Miller, DVM, ACVIM | Alysa B. Cook, DVM
Nicolas Berryessa joined the GVS Internal Medicine service in 2008 from Iowa State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, where he served as a clinical instructor in small animal internal medicine. He grew up on the West Coast and received his undergraduate degree from the University of California Davis, but moved to the East Coast where he obtained his DVM from Cornell University.


GVS Home Page

www.gvsvets.com [cached]

Mark Dorfman, DVM, MS, ACVIM | Derek Duval, VMD, ACVIM | Lisa Langs, DVM, ACVIM | Meri Miller, DVM, ACVIM | Nicolas Berryessa, DVM, ACVIM | Alysa B. Cook, DVM
Nicolas Berryessa joined the GVS Internal Medicine service in 2008 from Iowa State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, where he served as a clinical instructor in small animal internal medicine. He grew up on the West Coast and received his undergraduate degree from the University of California Davis, but moved to the East Coast where he obtained his DVM from Cornell University.


GVS Home Page

www.gvsvets.com [cached]

Nicolas Berryessa joined the GVS Internal Medicine service in 2008 from Iowa State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, where he served as a clinical instructor in small animal internal medicine.
He grew up on the West Coast and received his undergraduate degree from the University of California Davis, but moved to the East Coast where he obtained his DVM from Cornell University.


Georgia puppy dog swallows a spoon I BluePearl Newsroom

bluepearlvet.com [cached]

Dr. Nicolas Berryessa, a BluePearl veterinarian who is board-certified in internal medicine, examined Zeus at the hospital.
He ordered X-rays which left no doubt that Zeus really did have a spoon in his stomach - with the handle sticking partly into the esophagus. Berryessa knew that without removing the spoon, Zeus would have suffered from repeated vomiting and other digestive problems. So Zeus was put under anesthesia. Berryessa then used an endoscope, which allowed him to view the spoon through a tiny camera. He pulled the spoon out of Zeus' stomach and through the throat using the same endoscope, with a snare attachment. Zeus was released back into Chang's hands after the procedure on Oct. 25. Although he was a bit woozy from anesthesia, Zeus was still the same friendly and playful pup, with an expression that seemed to say "Oh, nothing's wrong," Chang said. She said she was pleased her dog was treated quickly and is now recovering well. Berryessa said it's a good reminder of the mishaps dogs get themselves into. BluePearl clinicians frequently treat pets who eat a variety of things they shouldn't, including corncobs, toys, pacifiers, socks and more. "They're quick and they'll eat all kinds of things, especially when they're puppies," Berryessa said.


Emergency veterinarian saves dog from ducky I BluePearl Newsroom

bluepearlvet.com [cached]

As Dr. Nicolas Berryessa attempted to remove the toy, a new mystery presented itself.
Why wouldn't the ducky budge out of Boost's stomach? Boost Berryessa is board-certified in veterinary internal medicine and has wide expertise in such things as infectious diseases, immune-mediated disorders and also the strange tendency of dogs to eat just about anything. With Boost under anesthesia, he inserted a long narrow device called an endoscope into Boost's mouth, all the way down to the stomach. He grabbed the ducky with the snare on the end of the scope, but for some reason it wouldn't move. Berryessa pulled, but not too hard - too much force could have caused damage. "I could not figure out why we couldn't get it out," he said.


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