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Wrong Nicholas Griseto?

Nicholas Griseto

President

Bradford Dyeing Association , Inc.

Direct Phone: (401) ***-****direct phone

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Bradford Dyeing Association , Inc.

Company Description

Bradford Dyeing Association, Inc. is a privately held Textile Finishing Plant Established in 1911 as a commissioned dyer and printer and is housed in over 500,000 square feet of manufacturing space. Bradford's primary production commitment is to the Military ...more

Background Information

Employment History

President and Chief Executive Officer

Bradford Printing & Finishing LLC


Web References(14 Total References)


www.shorepublishing.com

Bradford Printing & Finishing CEO Nick Griseto talks about his willingness to work with unions to create a contract for his employees at the factory in Bradford, R.I., on Wednesday.
Now, Nick Griseto, the former BDA executive who kept the century-old business going, is hoping he's not the one who presides over its demise, a fate he says could result from management's bargaining impasse with a labor union he insists his production workers don't want. "I'm being put into a position where I can't survive," the 54-year-old Griseto, Bradford's president and chief executive officer, said Wednesday in an interview at the plant. "I can't continue to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on legal bills. If (employees) want a union, I have no problem with it. My proposal is on the table." At this point, Griseto has no choice but to negotiate. In a decision that came down last week, the National Labor Relations Board ruled that the company had "unlawfully refused to recognize and bargain with the incumbent union," the New England Joint Board/UNITE HERE. A three-member panel upheld an administrative law judge who discounted a 2009 petition signed by employees who opposed continued union representation. Judge Raymond Green, in his ruling last April, found the petition had been "tainted" by Griseto's "unlawful formation" of a "Guiding Coalition" - a group of managers and employees who were supposed to deal with labor matters at the plant. Even before the decision, the NLRB's regional director in Boston sought an injunction against Griseto in federal court in Rhode Island. While Griseto said the "well-thought-out" proposal he's offered the union places the ball in the union's court, the union disagrees. "The (NLRB) decision says he must recognize the union and bargain in good faith," Warren Pepicelli, the New England Joint Board's manager, said Wednesday, referring to Griseto. The union has continued to file complaints against the company with the NLRB's Boston office, even objecting to the "unilateral" way in which Griseto granted employees a 10 percent raise around the first of the year. Then, when delays in approving the defense budget held up apparel manufacturers' orders for fabric, Bradford's business slowed "to a trickle," Griseto said, forcing him to lay off 11 people. He kept the raises in place, he said, but had to roll them back a couple of weeks later when he laid off eight more workers. "Our business is off 60 to 70 percent," Griseto said. "We should be producing 25,000 yards of fabric a day, but we're down to 10,000 yards a day. ... Up to the day of the flood (a year ago), we were making money." Griseto walked a reporter through the cavernous, fire-scarred plant Wednesday, encouraging conversation with employees.


www.theday.com

Bradford Printing & Finishing CEO Nick Griseto talks about his willingness to work with unions to create a contract for his employees at the factory in Bradford, R.I., on Wednesday.
Now, Nick Griseto, the former BDA executive who kept the century-old business going, is hoping he's not the one who presides over its demise, a fate he says could result from management's bargaining impasse with a labor union he insists his production workers don't want. "I'm being put into a position where I can't survive," the 54-year-old Griseto, Bradford's president and chief executive officer, said Wednesday in an interview at the plant. "I can't continue to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on legal bills. If (employees) want a union, I have no problem with it. My proposal is on the table." At this point, Griseto has no choice but to negotiate. In a decision that came down last week, the National Labor Relations Board ruled that the company had "unlawfully refused to recognize and bargain with the incumbent union," the New England Joint Board/UNITE HERE. A three-member panel upheld an administrative law judge who discounted a 2009 petition signed by employees who opposed continued union representation. Judge Raymond Green, in his ruling last April, found the petition had been "tainted" by Griseto's "unlawful formation" of a "Guiding Coalition" - a group of managers and employees who were supposed to deal with labor matters at the plant. Even before the decision, the NLRB's regional director in Boston sought an injunction against Griseto in federal court in Rhode Island. While Griseto said the "well-thought-out" proposal he's offered the union places the ball in the union's court, the union disagrees. "The (NLRB) decision says he must recognize the union and bargain in good faith," Warren Pepicelli, the New England Joint Board's manager, said Wednesday, referring to Griseto. The union has continued to file complaints against the company with the NLRB's Boston office, even objecting to the "unilateral" way in which Griseto granted employees a 10 percent raise around the first of the year. Then, when delays in approving the defense budget held up apparel manufacturers' orders for fabric, Bradford's business slowed "to a trickle," Griseto said, forcing him to lay off 11 people. He kept the raises in place, he said, but had to roll them back a couple of weeks later when he laid off eight more workers. "Our business is off 60 to 70 percent," Griseto said. "We should be producing 25,000 yards of fabric a day, but we're down to 10,000 yards a day. ... Up to the day of the flood (a year ago), we were making money." Griseto walked a reporter through the cavernous, fire-scarred plant Wednesday, encouraging conversation with employees.


www.statewidecoalition.com

Nick Griseto, president and CEO of Bradford Printing and Finishing, said he can't even tell yet what kind of damage the water surrounding his factory has wrought.
"Most of it is still uncertain," he said Thursday. "It difficult to even get in and assess the damage." Griseto said the four feet of water that surrounded his plant after Tuesday's rains receded only two inches in the interim. If the water goes down by two feet, he said, he will still need a boat to get to the building but at least he'll be able to get inside see what, if anything, the storm did.


www.projo.com

Nick Griseto, chief executive officer and president of the new company, said production will start today.
Bradford Dyeing had operated since 1911 and printed 15 million yards of fabric each year, mostly for the U.S. military. Griseto, formerly executive vice president for sales and marketing at Bradford Dyeing, said the new entity is buying the old company's property, building and equipment from former owner, Michael Grills. Griseto said the new company already has production contracts in place.


www.projo.com

Nick Griseto, chief executive officer and president of the new company, said he hopes to have an opening ceremony at the old Bradford Dyeing plant in Westerly on Jan. 5 and begin production Jan. 6.
He said the company was looking to hire about 80 people to start, with the possibility of more to come. "It's good news in a bad-news environment," he said. Griseto said he needed to move quickly — company staffers would go over applications this week and notify the new hires by Dec. 30. Griseto said the new entity is buying the old company's property, building and equipment from former owner Michael Grills, but declined to name the price. Griseto, who had been executive vice president for sales and marketing at the Bradford association, has partnered with former Bradford colleague Vasco Ferreira, who will be chief financial officer. Griseto and Jackson said about half the people filling out applications at the armory had been employees of Bradford Dyeing and about half were new faces. Griseto said the new company already has production contracts in place. By law, he said, material for U.S military uniforms has to be manufactured in the United States. It feels kind of foolish, actually," said Penny Deniger, 27, of Westerly, who was holding her seven-month-old son, Nicholas. Griseto said the feelings of former Bradford employees are understandable, but everyone had to realize that this was now a new company. The Bradford Dyeing Association had operated in Westerly since 1911. We're anxious to get it started, and then we'll go from there," Griseto said.


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