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This profile was last updated on 5/21/2017 and contains contributions from the  Zoominfo Community.

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Aaron J. Newman

Associate Professor

Dalhousie University

HQ Phone:  (902) 292-1123

Direct Phone: (902) ***-****direct phone

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Dalhousie University

1355 Oxford Street

Halifax, Nova Scotia,B3H 4J1

Canada

Company Description

Dalhousie University is Atlantic Canada's leading research-intensive university and a driver of the region's intellectual, social and economic development. Located in the province of Nova Scotia, Dalhousie's 18,500 students and 6,000 faculty and staff foster a...more

Background Information

Employment History

Graduate Program Coordinator

Neuroscience Research Australia


Affiliations

Brain Repair Centre

Member


Life Sciences PA

Assistant Professor, Undergraduate Program Advisor


Queen

Member of the Recreational Sailing Club


University of Oregon

Doctoral Student


Peer Support Centre

Volunteer


University of Rochester

Research Associate


Education

Education

University of Toronto


BA


MSc


Masters of Teaching

U of T


Ph.D.

Psychology

University of Oregon


undergraduate degree

University of Winnipeg


Web References(76 Total References)


Our People - Department of Psychology and Neuroscience - Dalhousie University

www.dal.ca [cached]

Aaron Newman
aaron.newman@dal.ca (902) 494-1911


Brain Processes Sign Language Similar to Spoken Language - Language Testing International

www.languagetesting.com [cached]

American Sign Language, or even simple gestures are processed by deaf people in the part of the brain that is used for spoken language, according to a recent international research study headed up by a neuroscientist from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), Aaron Newman, Associate Professor with the university's Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, and collaborators Ted Supalla and Elissa Newport from Georgetown University, student Nina Fernandez, and Daphne Bavelier from the Universities of Geneva and Rochester, were able to show those who are congenitally deaf process signs and gestures in the left hemisphere of the brain.
"It is a basic science study, with no immediate implications for people in the area of health," Newman said in an interview. However, it does give credence and stature to the importance of American Sign Language and supports the idea that it is a language. "There is research going back to the '60s showing that ASL is not universally appreciated, and it touches on issues concerning the idea it is not a language," Newman said. Since most people typically think of sound when language is employed or view language as something that can be written down, there has been some argument from some individuals suggesting sign language is not an actual language. "Sign language uses space (as opposed to sound or writing), and it looks like a gesture but behaves like a language. Brains really can adapt to different forms of expression and still impose rules," Newman said. "This research confirms sign language is treated by the brain as a language. The study, which employed 19 deaf and 19 hearing subjects, is further proof of the adaptability of the brain. "Brains are so adaptable, as soon as something looks like a language, the brain uses it that way," Newman said.


HRC Brain Research - Research Canada

rc-rc.ca [cached]

Dr. Aaron Newman
Associate Professor - Psychology, Psychiatry, Surgery, & Pediatrics (Div. of Neurology), Dalhousie University


NCIL People

www.ncilab.ca [cached]

Aaron Newman
Lab Director - Aaron is an Associate Professor in Psychology, Psychiatry, Surgery, and Pediatrics at Dalhousie University. He is a member of the Brain Repair Centre, and is on the Scientific Staff of the QEII Hospital and the IWK Health Centre. Now a graduate student in Aaron Newman's lab, Lyam's primary research interests are focussed on exploring individual differences in language processing and potential barriers to new language acquisition, using both EEG and MEG. Supervised by Dr. Newman, he is conducting a study to determine whether playing certain computer games can improve adult cochlear implant and hearing aid users' memory, attention, and hearing. Web Design by Aaron Newman and Diane Waligura


Graduate Students - Department of Psychology

psychology.dal.ca [cached]

Supervisor: Aaron Newman
Supervisors: Aaron Newman and Ryan D'Arcy Supervisor: Aaron Newman and Gail Eskes


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