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Wrong Mustapha Debboun?

Mustapha Col Ameddcs Debboun

Program Manager of the Department of Defense's Repellants and Personal Protection Program

Walter Reed Army Institute of Research

HQ Phone:  (301) 319-9657

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Walter Reed Army Institute of Research

503 Robert Grant Avenue Suite 2W78

Silver Spring, Maryland,20910

United States

Company Description

Headquartered in Silver Spring, Maryland, the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) dates back to 1893 and is the largest, most diverse biomedical research laboratory in the Department of Defense. WRAIR provides unique research capabilities and innova... more

Find other employees at this company (528)

Background Information

Employment History

Colonel, Medical Services

Army Corps


Web References(9 Total References)


PCT Online :: News :: ARS Develops Promising New Compound for Insect Repellents

www.pctonline.com [cached]

Entomologist Jerome A. Klun, who heads the CAIBL team working with the military's infectious disease research program, collaborated with WRAIR's Mustapha Debboun, a medical entomologist, to develop a clear, six-chamber device with which to safely screen candidate compounds on human volunteers' skin.


USDA Press Release (June 2, 2003) -- Promising New Compound for Fending Off Insects

www.pestlaw.com [cached]

Entomologist Jerome A. Klun, who heads the CAIBL team working with the military's infectious disease research program, collaborated with WRAIR's Mustapha Debboun, a medical entomologist, to develop a clear, six-chamber device with which to safely screen candidate compounds on human volunteers' skin.


USDA Press Release (June 2, 2003) -- Promising New Compound for Fending Off Insects

www.pestlaw.net [cached]

Entomologist Jerome A. Klun, who heads the CAIBL team working with the military's infectious disease research program, collaborated with WRAIR's Mustapha Debboun, a medical entomologist, to develop a clear, six-chamber device with which to safely screen candidate compounds on human volunteers' skin.


sunspot.net - maryland news

www.sunspot.net [cached]

Mustapha Debboun, program manager of the Department of Defense's repellants and personal protection program at Walter Reed.DEET, or diethyl-meta-toluamide, is a key ingredient in most of the insect repellents sold in what is a $1 billion industry worldwide.Commercially available since 1957, DEET is sold in 230 products made by 70 companies and is used by about one-third of the U.S. population each year to repel biting pests such as mosquitoes and ticks, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.But there are concerns about its safety.Although most studies say DEET is safe, some recommend using it only in low doses because of evidence that high doses may cause health problems, particularly when used with other medications or insecticides.Jerome A. Klun, an ARS research entomologist working with Debboun, said they began work five years ago when they saw a need for a replacement for DEET.


sunspot.net - health

www.sunspot.net [cached]

Mustapha Debboun, program manager of the Department of Defense's repellants and personal protection program at Walter Reed.DEET, or diethyl-meta-toluamide, is a key ingredient in most of the insect repellents sold in what is a $1 billion industry worldwide.Commercially available since 1957, DEET is sold in 230 products made by 70 companies and is used by about one-third of the U.S. population each year to repel biting pests such as mosquitoes and ticks, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.But there are concerns about its safety.Although most studies say DEET is safe, some recommend using it only in low doses because of evidence that high doses may cause health problems, particularly when used with other medications or insecticides.Jerome A. Klun, an ARS research entomologist working with Debboun, said they began work five years ago when they saw a need for a replacement for DEET.


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