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Wrong Murray Favus?

Dr. Murray J. Favus

Director

University of Chicago Medical Center

Email: m***@***.edu

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University of Chicago Medical Center

Background Information

Employment History

Professor

University of Chicago

Professor of Medicine, Head, Endocrine Section

University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine , Chicago

Professor of Medicine

Univ Chicago School of Med

Affiliations

Board Member
National Osteoporosis Foundation

Education

MD

Web References (97 Total References)


Endotext.com - Diseases Of Bone And Calcium Metabolism, Contributors

www.endotext.org [cached]

Murray Favus, MD Director, Bone Program: Director, Clinical Research Center University of Chicago Medical Center,-MC5100, 5841 South Maryland Ave, Chicago, IL 60637


In an email to Reuters Health, ...

www.caring4womenshealth.com [cached]

In an email to Reuters Health, Dr. Murray Favus, who directs the bone program at the University of Chicago Medical Center, said the new findings might ease concerns about the drugs.

Only about one in 100,000 people taking bone drugs actually develop osteonecrosis of the jaw, he said, and the atypical fractures linked to the drugs are also very uncommon he said.
"The concern about complications or just not being committed to the medication has led many patients to stop oral bisphosphonate therapy," he said.


Optimism on Osteoporosis: Research and Treatment

www.agingwellmag.com [cached]

"The awareness of it really came about 15 to 20 years ago," says Murray Favus, MD, director of the Bone Program and the Clinical Research Center at the University of Chicago Medical Center, who holds appointments in endocrinology and nephrology.

...
"It's certainly the frontline drug," Favus says.
...
"We recommend people should keep good oral health, but they don't need to stay away from the drug," Favus says.
Other bisphosphonates include risedronic acid (Actonel), also a widely used oral drug taken monthly, and ibandronic acid (Boniva), which is taken once per month or four times per year intravenously.
Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is given once per year intravenously and can last for 12 months following one infusion. Originally developed in 2001 to treat bone cancer, it was thought for years to be an effective treatment for osteoporosis. Approved by the FDA in 2007, the drug can be administered intravenously in only 15 minutes, is well tolerated, and "reduces hip and spine fractures as well as anything available on the market now," according to Favus. Individuals on Reclast do not need to take anything other than calcium and vitamin D supplements, he adds, which are the building blocks for all these treatments.
...
"SERMs are important options, especially for those who may not respond to bisphosphonates," Favus says.
Also referred to as estrogen agonists/antagonists, the drugs work like estrogen on the bone, while at other sites, such as the breast, the drug acts as an antiestrogen. "This means they don't stimulate breast tissue nor do they stimulate the lining of the uterus. They have even been shown to reduce the rates of new breast cancers," Favus says.
One SERM approved by the FDA in 2007 is raloxifene (Evista). The daily drug, taken orally, has been shown in clinical studies to reduce spinal fractures, but data do not support a reduction in hip fractures. "That's a concern, and so the doctor has to look carefully at the needs of the individual patient in terms of selecting a drug," Favus says.
...
But most important to Favus "is that we may soon have another very effective drug."
...
Murray Favus, MD, of the University of Chicago Medical Center, would like to see strontium ranelate given a trial in the United States but doubts it will happen because of expensive trial costs that could lead to companies sharing profits.


Optimism on Osteoporosis: Research and Treatment

www.todaysgeriatricmedicine.com [cached]

"The awareness of it really came about 15 to 20 years ago," says Murray Favus, MD, director of the Bone Program and the Clinical Research Center at the University of Chicago Medical Center, who holds appointments in endocrinology and nephrology.

...
"It's certainly the frontline drug," Favus says.
...
"We recommend people should keep good oral health, but they don't need to stay away from the drug," Favus says.
Other bisphosphonates include risedronic acid (Actonel), also a widely used oral drug taken monthly, and ibandronic acid (Boniva), which is taken once per month or four times per year intravenously.
Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is given once per year intravenously and can last for 12 months following one infusion. Originally developed in 2001 to treat bone cancer, it was thought for years to be an effective treatment for osteoporosis. Approved by the FDA in 2007, the drug can be administered intravenously in only 15 minutes, is well tolerated, and "reduces hip and spine fractures as well as anything available on the market now," according to Favus. Individuals on Reclast do not need to take anything other than calcium and vitamin D supplements, he adds, which are the building blocks for all these treatments.
...
"SERMs are important options, especially for those who may not respond to bisphosphonates," Favus says.
Also referred to as estrogen agonists/antagonists, the drugs work like estrogen on the bone, while at other sites, such as the breast, the drug acts as an antiestrogen. "This means they don't stimulate breast tissue nor do they stimulate the lining of the uterus. They have even been shown to reduce the rates of new breast cancers," Favus says.
One SERM approved by the FDA in 2007 is raloxifene (Evista). The daily drug, taken orally, has been shown in clinical studies to reduce spinal fractures, but data do not support a reduction in hip fractures. "That's a concern, and so the doctor has to look carefully at the needs of the individual patient in terms of selecting a drug," Favus says.
...
But most important to Favus "is that we may soon have another very effective drug."
...
Murray Favus, MD, of the University of Chicago Medical Center, would like to see strontium ranelate given a trial in the United States but doubts it will happen because of expensive trial costs that could lead to companies sharing profits.


Dr. Murray Favus of the ...

www.ibj.com [cached]

Dr. Murray Favus of the University of Chicago Medical Center said he has, overall, been pleased with the safety data seen with denosumab.However, he said given that a few patients taking the drug also developed neoplasms, or cancerous tumors, there needs to be a balance between the preventive benefits of the drug and risks.

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