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Wrong Molly Moody?

Molly Moody

Community Organizer

North Missoula Community Development Corporation

HQ Phone:  (406) 829-0873

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

North Missoula Community Development Corporation

1500 Burns Street

Missoula, Montana,59802

United States

Company Description

Since 2000, the NMCDC has managed the homestead through a cooperative agreement with the City of Missoula Parks and Recreation Department. This public-nonprofit partnership receives significant support from the private sector and provides an innovative model f... more

Find other employees at this company (6)

Web References(41 Total References)


NMCDC | Contact information

www.nmcdc.org [cached]

Molly Moody
Community Organizer 406.829.0873


missoulafoodcoop.com

In 2003, the Catholic Campaign for Human Development contributed $10,000 to pursue the project and the NMCDC hired Molly Moody, in a part time position, to head the effort.
After Rae's departure, Molly continued as both a staff member of the NMCDC and its liaison to CFAC. Kate and Tessa worked closely with Molly on all these related food projects. Molly Moody got some early legal advice on co-op incorporation from a firm recommended by Jan Tusick of Mission Mountain Cooperative Development Center and then some additional advice from a local attorney at Worden Thane and Haines, Peter Dayton. Molly consulted a specialist lawyer in the start up of cooperatives in Vermont, Laddie Lushin and also Jim Kaze from the Montana Cooperative Development Center, both of whom helped guide her through a co-op's complex incorporation process. Molly Moody, while in the NMCDC's employ, spent much time over her tenure investigating co-op models and researching the comparative operations of co-ops across the country. Molly was the first to propose the Park Slope model for our consideration. A point of conjecture at the time was whether the Park Slope model could perform as successfully in the much less densely populated city of Missoula. (In 2000, the Park Slope neighborhood of Brooklyn had a population of more than 62,000 persons.) Molly was responsible for seeing through the co-op's legal work and incorporation as only the third consumer food cooperative in the State of Montana. Molly also spearheaded the outstanding federal appropriations request for the remodel of the Burns Street Building.


www.missoulacommunitymarket.org

Molly from NMCDC offered to share a table/space with Good Schools Missoula. iii.Meredith talked to Molly Moody of the NMCDC and asked her to attend meetings periodically to give us an update on where things are at with the B Street Coop and perhaps provides a monthly written update to the MCC Board. x. Fin/Op will begin drafting topics and language for an MOU with the NMCDC.Molly from NMCDC offered to share a table/space with Good Schools Missoula.ix. Meredith talked to Molly Moody of the NMCDC and asked her to attend meetings periodically to give us an update on where things are at with the B Street Coop and perhaps provides a monthly written update to the MCC Board.


How did we get here... a little background » Missoula Community Food Co-op

missoulafoodcoop.com [cached]

In 2003, the Catholic Campaign for Human Development contributed $10,000 to pursue the project and the NMCDC hired Molly Moody, in a part time position, to head the effort.
After Rae's departure, Molly continued as both a staff member of the NMCDC and its liaison to CFAC. Kate and Tessa worked closely with Molly on all these related food projects. Molly Moody got some early legal advice on co-op incorporation from a firm recommended by Jan Tusick of Mission Mountain Cooperative Development Center and then some additional advice from a local attorney at Worden Thane and Haines, Peter Dayton. Molly consulted a specialist lawyer in the start up of cooperatives in Vermont, Laddie Lushin and also Jim Kaze from the Montana Cooperative Development Center, both of whom helped guide her through a co-op's complex incorporation process. Molly Moody, while in the NMCDC's employ, spent much time over her tenure investigating co-op models and researching the comparative operations of co-ops across the country. Molly was the first to propose the Park Slope model for our consideration. A point of conjecture at the time was whether the Park Slope model could perform as successfully in the much less densely populated city of Missoula. (In 2000, the Park Slope neighborhood of Brooklyn had a population of more than 62,000 persons.) Molly was responsible for seeing through the co-op's legal work and incorporation as only the third consumer food cooperative in the State of Montana. Molly also spearheaded the outstanding federal appropriations request for the remodel of the Burns Street Building.


www.missoulacommunitymarket.org

Molly Moody, community organizer for the NMCDC, shepherded the co-op/kitchen through its initial years of organizing, research, and business planning.
The work of the NMCDC staff on this project was funded largely by multi-year grants from the Catholic Campaign for Human Development and the USDA Community Food Solutions. All told, the NMCDC has invested more than $230,000 toward development of Missoula's first food cooperative.


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