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Wrong Mohamed Bassiouny?

Mohamed A. Bassiouny

Professor of Restorative Dentistry

Temple University

HQ Phone:  (215) 204-7000

Direct Phone: (215) ***-****direct phone

Email: m***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Temple University

1601 North Broad Street, Room 206

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania,19122

United States

Company Description

Temple University, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was founded in 1884. Temple has seven campuses in Pennsylvania, as well as campuses in Rome, Tokyo, Singapore, and London. Temple is among the nation's greatest providers of professional education (in law, medi...more

Web References(68 Total References)


It's Getting Hot. What are You Drinking? | Marea White DDS

www.mareawhitedds.com [cached]

Insurance provider Carefree Dental cites a conversation with Dr. Mohamed Bassiouny, a restorative dentistry professor at Temple University:
"Research is showing that the lack of sugar is not making these drinks any less corrosive, as most soft drinks still have a significant amount of acidity. In fact, Bassiouny says that the carbonation could make the drink more acidic. For example, one of Bassiouny patients came to him after drinking a liter of diet soda every day for the past three years. He said that her teeth were comparable to that of a methamphetamine user, commonly called "meth mouth.


Diet Soda Habit as Bad for Teeth as Meth Addiction, Study Claims | Health Store

www.healthstore.com [cached]

"You look at it side-to-side with 'meth mouth' or 'coke mouth,' it is startling to see the intensity and extent of damage more or less the same," said Dr. Mohamed Bassiouny, a professor of restorative dentistry at the Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia.
Methamphetamine, crack cocaine and soda - sweetened or not - are all highly acidic and can cause similar dental problems, Bassiouny said in a study published recently in the journalGeneral Dentistry. The acid in soda is in the form of citric acid and phosphoric acid, Bassiouny said. Without good dental hygiene, constant exposure can cause erosion and significant oral damage, he said. In his study, he found that a woman in her 30s who drank 2 liters of diet soda daily for three to five years experienced tooth rot and decay remarkably similar to that suffered by a 29-year-old methamphetamine addict and a 51-year-old habitual crack cocaine user. "None of the teeth affected by erosion were salvageable," Bassiouny said. The woman had to have all of her teeth removed and replaced with dentures. Prevention is the best cure, Bassiouny said. How often you drink soda, how much you drink and how long it's in your mouth all are important factors. "You can help prevent it from happening by reducing any of those," he said. Sugar-free soda is no better than regular soda when it comes to dental decay, Bassiouny added. "Both of them have the same drastic effect if they are consumed in the same frequency, the same amount and the same duration," he said.


June 2013 - Catonsville Dental Care

www.catonsvilledentalcare.com [cached]

"You look at it side-to-side with 'meth mouth' or 'coke mouth,' it is startling to see the intensity and extent of damage more or less the same," said Dr. Mohamed Bassiouny, a professor of restorative dentistry at the Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia.
In his study, Dr. Bassiouny studied a woman who drank 2 liters of diet soda every day for two to five years. He found that the woman experienced tooth decay similar to that of a "29-year-old methamphetamine addict and a 51-year-old habitual crack cocaine user. "You can help prevent [tooth decay] from happening by reducing any of those," said Bassiouny.


Diet Soda Can Damage Teeth as Severely as Illegal Drugs - Dear Doctor magazine

www.deardoctor.com [cached]

The study's lead author, Dr. Mohamed A. Bassiouny, examined patients at dental clinics in Philadelphia and Appalachia over the course of two decades.
He found a striking similarity between the teeth of patients who consumed large quantities of soda and those who used methamphetamines or crack cocaine. In his article, Dr. Bassiouny, a professor of dentistry at Temple University, compared the damage in three individuals' mouths: an admitted user of methamphetamine, a previous longtime user of cocaine, and a woman who drank two liters of diet soda per day. "Each person experienced severe tooth erosion caused by the high acid levels present in their 'drug' of choice - meth, crack, or soda," Dr. Bassiouny said. "The citric acid present in both regular and diet soda is known to have a high potential for causing tooth erosion." Dr. Bassiouny noted that you don't even need to consume as much as two liters of soda per day to damage your teeth, as the effect of soda-drinking is cumulative. Even those who drink more than one regular-sized 12-ounce soda per day are at risk of dental erosion, he said. "The striking similarities found in this study should be a wake-up call to consumers who think that soda - even diet soda - is not harmful to their oral health," Dr. Bassiouny said.


'Soda Mouth' Can Look Alot Like 'Meth Mouth' - Family Dentist in Tampa, FL

www.rperezdds.com [cached]

The author, Mohamed Bassiouny, a researcher and professor of dentistry at Temple University in Philadelphia, insists he's not trying to scare soda drinkers.
He says he has observed striking similarities between the lesions on the teeth of crack and methamphetamine addicts, and those on the teeth of people addicted to soda.


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