About | Free Trial

Last Update

2016-04-01T00:00:00.000Z

This profile was last updated on . .

Is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Miriam Altman?

Dr. Miriam Altman

Head of Strategy

Telkom

HQ Phone: +27 12 321 5808

Email: a***@***.za

Telkom

Towers North 152 Johannes Ramokhoase Street

Pretoria, 2

South Africa

Company Description

8ta - South African's newest mobile network more

Find other employees at this company (9,809)

Background Information

Employment History

Commissioner
National Planning Commission

Chairperson
The Tiger Brands Foundation

Executive Director
Human Sciences Research Council

Education



BA
economics
McGill University

Ms Marina Mayer

PhD
economics
University of Manchester

Web References (94 Total References)


Trustees

www.thetigerbrandsfoundation.com [cached]

Dr Miriam Altman

...
Dr Miriam Altman (Chairperson)
Head of Strategy - Telkom SOC Ltd Commissioner National Planning Commission - Presidency


Miriam Altman ...

www.iicom.org [cached]

Miriam Altman (Dr)

...
Miriam Altman (Dr)
Head of Strategy, Telkom SA


What economic future, South Africa?

www.frontieradvisory.com [cached]

Following Mathe, Miriam Altman, a former NPC commissioner and now the chief corporate strategist for Telkom, argued that while it was important for this country to nurture and grow its manufacturing output, that sector was unlikely to be a major source of employment for the foreseeable future. Altman said there is a real need to figure out, concretely, how the country is going to generate the 11 million jobs by 2030 called for in the NDP; there is a need to stress test the assumptions as well as the dreams of them.

Altman said that realistically, it was unlikely more than 3% of employment created in the country over the next generation would - or could - actually come from the country's manufacturing sector. The reason for this was that for manufacturing to be globally competitive, productivity needed to increase and that generally came from squeezing out labour in improved production efficiency, rather than adding labour to the manufacturing processes. Or, as Altman told her audience, "That doesn't mean that we shouldn't promote manufacturing, but it is very unlikely [the sector will create many new jobs] because a successful manufacturing sector in South Africa would require substantial productivity improvement. Moreover, because the country had volatile exchange rate circumstances, that put a further crimp on expanding manufacturing, much less labour-intensive manufacturing. Instead, South Africa, like pretty much everywhere else, is going to have to look to the services sector for much of its new job growth. Altman noted, "Most jobs come from services and we need to get a much greater sense of how we promote dynamism in services and how we stimulate services employment.
...
As Altman noted, because "The future of work is in low-paid work," if cash wages were low, that would actually put further pressure on the government to ensure there was a fuller social security system of social benefits to help relieve the upward demand pressure on cash wages. Altman and Mathe, asked if their presentations seemed to point to a more thorough interrogation of the nation's political will to make the hard choices needed to get this done, Mathe replied that the nation's leadership has made the requisite statements about the will to achieve such changes and that "our job is to believe them. There already is, for example, a ramping up of national investment in infrastructure consistent with the NDP. And Altman added that the president's recent SONA "gives me good vibes".
...
In response, Altman replied that there continues to be a social need to protect South Africa's hard-won labour gains.


What economic future, South Africa?

www.frontier-advisory.com [cached]

Following Mathe, Miriam Altman, a former NPC commissioner and now the chief corporate strategist for Telkom, argued that while it was important for this country to nurture and grow its manufacturing output, that sector was unlikely to be a major source of employment for the foreseeable future. Altman said there is a real need to figure out, concretely, how the country is going to generate the 11 million jobs by 2030 called for in the NDP; there is a need to stress test the assumptions as well as the dreams of them.

Altman said that realistically, it was unlikely more than 3% of employment created in the country over the next generation would - or could - actually come from the country's manufacturing sector. The reason for this was that for manufacturing to be globally competitive, productivity needed to increase and that generally came from squeezing out labour in improved production efficiency, rather than adding labour to the manufacturing processes. Or, as Altman told her audience, "That doesn't mean that we shouldn't promote manufacturing, but it is very unlikely [the sector will create many new jobs] because a successful manufacturing sector in South Africa would require substantial productivity improvement. Moreover, because the country had volatile exchange rate circumstances, that put a further crimp on expanding manufacturing, much less labour-intensive manufacturing. Instead, South Africa, like pretty much everywhere else, is going to have to look to the services sector for much of its new job growth. Altman noted, "Most jobs come from services and we need to get a much greater sense of how we promote dynamism in services and how we stimulate services employment.
...
As Altman noted, because "The future of work is in low-paid work," if cash wages were low, that would actually put further pressure on the government to ensure there was a fuller social security system of social benefits to help relieve the upward demand pressure on cash wages. Altman and Mathe, asked if their presentations seemed to point to a more thorough interrogation of the nation's political will to make the hard choices needed to get this done, Mathe replied that the nation's leadership has made the requisite statements about the will to achieve such changes and that "our job is to believe them. There already is, for example, a ramping up of national investment in infrastructure consistent with the NDP. And Altman added that the president's recent SONA "gives me good vibes".
...
In response, Altman replied that there continues to be a social need to protect South Africa's hard-won labour gains.


Dr Miriam Altman, Head of ...

www.itnewsafrica.com [cached]

Dr Miriam Altman, Head of Strategy of Telkom Group. (Image source: Telkom Group)

...
Telkom GCEO Sipho Maseko today announced the appointment of Dr Miriam Altman as Head of Strategy of Telkom Group with effect from 1 June 2013. Dr Altman will support the development and execution of Telkom's strategy and will report directly to the GCEO.

Similar Profiles

Other People with this Name

Other people with the name Altman

Phil Altman
The Healthy Choice Compounding Pharmacy

Kayreen Altman
IDSGA

Michael Altman
John Jay Homestead Inc

Gardner Altman
Advantaged Capital

Jack Altman
The Wren Youth Association Inc

Browse ZoomInfo's Business Contact Directory by City

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory