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This profile was last updated on 1/18/11  and contains information from public web pages.

Mr. Milovan Milovanovic

Wrong Milovan Milovanovic?

Foreign Minister

Serbian
 
Background

Employment History

  • Prime Minister
    Serbian
  • Legal Associate, Administration
    Serbian
  • Foreign Minister
    The Serbian Orthodox Church

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Member
    National Radical Party
6 Total References
Web References
On March 13, 1912, the Serbian-Bulgarian ...
www.serbianna.com, 18 Jan 2011 [cached]
On March 13, 1912, the Serbian-Bulgarian treaty was signed by Ivan Gueshov and Serbian prime minister Milovan Milovanovic and by King Peter of Serbia and King Ferdinand of Bulgaria.
...
But he insisted on a clause covering autonomy as he told Milovan Milovanovic, the Serbian foreign minister on October, 1912: "I need hardly tell you that no Bulgarian government will venture, even if it felt so disposed, to conclude with Serbia an understanding which does not provide for Macedonian autonomy.
IVC/WAC Alumni
www.ivc-rtp.org, 5 Nov 2004 [cached]
August 2004, Mr. Milovan Milovanovic , Legal Associate, Serbian Administration for the Prevention of Money Laundering
THE BALKAN PIEDMONT
www.batakovic.com, 28 Feb 1997 [cached]
In a study on the Eastern question (1894), one of the leaders of the Radicals, Milovan Milovanovic, speaking about the creation of a Franco-Russian alliance, predicted "a new era of fateful and epochal events. He stressed that Serbia, like other states in south-eastern Europe, was a creation of Russia's policy and that "all its efforts should be aimed at making itself, its progress and its national mission part of the Russian policy program for resolving the Eastern question, making itself indispensable to Russia, and determining that its interests and its goals coincide, in every aspect, with the Russian goals as regards the Eastern question and showing that, in it, Russia can always find a reliable associate for its own, and the general Slav policy. Otherwise, Serbia will soon be crushed (...) A Russian-French action is on the threshold. The Eastern question is entering a new phase, perhaps its last one. (31) Milovanovic's program, published at the time of the Dual Monarchy's full domination over the political life of Serbia, was an expression not only of the people's wide-spread feeling that Austria-Hungary was their natural enemy, and that Russia was the Serbs' traditional ally, but also of the very ideology of the National Radical Party, followed by a majority of Serbia's electorate: that internal freedom could be achieved on the model of the French Radicals' political solutions, and, on the foreign political plane - by leaning on Russian support.(32) The Empire of the Tsars, in contrast to the time of Ilija Garasanins' "Nacertanije" (1844), was no longer a power, like Austria-Hungary, that could endanger the independence, internal policy and political aspirations of Serbia.
...
Serbian statesman and diplomat Milovan Milovanovic wrote in 1911 that "Austria-Hungary is right when it accuses Serbia of Yugoslav national scheming, but it has forgotten that it had directed Serbia, that it had, actually, forced Serbia to go that way".(53)
...
Following upon the expression of an idea of the Serbian Foreign Minister Milovan Milovanovic and to avoid a European war, Serbia tried to get some compensation in Raska (Sandjak) and to avoid a European war. The request for compensation did not meet with the expected response among the friendly powers - Russia, France and Great Britain, even though it meant the indirect recognition of the annexation. The powers of the Entente, although inclined towards Serbia, avoided even thinking about waging a war against Austria-Hungary and Germany because of the Bosnian crisis.
The Serbian public, along with the National Radical Party of which Milovanovic was a member, was against such a solution. It was considered that Europe should be blackmailed with the threat of war against Austria-Hungary.
...
Milovan Milovanovic, disappointed by the issue of the Bosnian crisis criticised the entire concept of Serbian "Piedmontism": During the last crisis Serbia was often compared to Piedmont and the Serbian Question to the Italian one. Meanwhile, Serbia's position and her task, as well as the difficulties she was faced with were quite different from the one which Piedmont had to confront... what does Serbia's position in the Balkans look like?
...
Milovanovic, scared of an Austro-Bulgarian collaboration in Macedonia concluded:
THE BALKAN PIEDMONT
www.bglink.com, 30 May 2003 [cached]
In a study on the Eastern question (1894), one of the leaders of the Radicals, Milovan Milovanovic, speaking about the creation of a Franco-Russian alliance, predicted "a new era of fateful and epochal events."He stressed that Serbia, like other states in south-eastern Europe, was a creation of Russia's policy and that "all its efforts should be aimed at making itself, its progress and its national mission part of the Russian policy program for resolving the Eastern question, making itself indispensable to Russia, and determining that its interests and its goals coincide, in every aspect, with the Russian goals as regards the Eastern question and showing that, in it, Russia can always find a reliable associate for its own, and the general Slav policy.Otherwise, Serbia will soon be crushed (...) A Russian-French action is on the threshold.The Eastern question is entering a new phase, perhaps its last one."(31) Milovanovic's program, published at the time of the Dual Monarchy's full domination over the political life of Serbia, was an expression not only of the people's wide-spread feeling that Austria-Hungary was their natural enemy, and that Russia was the Serbs' traditional ally, but also of the very ideology of the National Radical Party, followed by a majority of Serbia's electorate: that internal freedom could be achieved on the model of the French Radicals' political solutions, and, on the foreign political plane - by leaning on Russian support.(32) The Empire of the Tsars, in contrast to the time of Ilija Garasanins' "Nacertanije" (1844), was no longer a power, like Austria-Hungary, that could endanger the independence, internal policy and political aspirations of Serbia.
...
Serbian statesman and diplomat Milovan Milovanovic wrote in 1911 that "Austria-Hungary is right when it accuses Serbia of Yugoslav national scheming, but it has forgotten that it had directed Serbia, that it had, actually, forced Serbia to go that way".(53)
...
Following upon the expression of an idea of the Serbian Foreign Minister Milovan Milovanovic and to avoid a European war, Serbia tried to get some compensation in Raska (Sandjak) and to avoid a European war.The request for compensation did not meet with the expected response among the friendly powers - Russia, France and Great Britain, even though it meant the indirect recognition of the annexation.The powers of the Entente, although inclined towards Serbia, avoided even thinking about waging a war against Austria-Hungary and Germany because of the Bosnian crisis.
,The Serbian public, along with the National Radical Party of which Milovanovic was a member, was against such a solution.It was considered that Europe should be blackmailed with the threat of war against Austria-Hungary.
...
,Milovan Milovanovic, disappointed by the issue of the Bosnian crisis criticised the entire concept of Serbian "Piedmontism": During the last crisis Serbia was often compared to Piedmont and the Serbian Question to the Italian one.Meanwhile, Serbia's position and her task, as well as the difficulties she was faced with were quite different from the one which Piedmont had to confront... what does Serbia's position in the Balkans look like?
...
,Milovanovic, scared of an Austro-Bulgarian collaboration in Macedonia concluded:
balkanalysis.com - Macedonia and the First Balkan War (Part 2)
www.balkanalysis.com, 25 April 2004 [cached]
On March 13, 1912, the Serbian-Bulgarian treaty was signed by Ivan Gueshov and Serbian prime minister Milovan Milovanovic and by King Peter of Serbia and King Ferdinand of Bulgaria.
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