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Wrong Mike Lynn?

Mr. Mike Lynn Sr.

President of the Oxford University Club

Ole Miss

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Ole Miss

Background Information

Employment History

New Orleans Museum

Affiliations

General Manager
NFL

Founder
Mid South Sports Action , Inc.

Web References (199 Total References)


Former Minnesota Vikings GM Mike ...

www.twincities.com [cached]

Former Minnesota Vikings GM Mike Lynn dies Tom Powers: There won't be another like Mike Lynn

...
The $975 million stadium the Minnesota Vikings will begin using in 2016 dooms the Metrodome and the gravy train that has enriched Mike Lynn for three-plus decades. It writes the final chapter in the curious tale of an ambitious executive, a paranoid owner, their dubious deal making and the estrangement that continues to haunt the team.
To Vikings fans of a certain age, Lynn is the dupe responsible for one of the most lopsided trades in sports history.
...
But Lynn was no naif. Dec. 20, 1990: Minnesota Vikings general manager Mike Lynn, shown with safety Joey Browner in training camp in August, will step down as general manager on
...
Dec. 20, 1990: Minnesota Vikings general manager Mike Lynn, shown with safety Joey Browner in training camp in August, will step down as general manager on Dec. 31 and will begin devoting all his energy to running the World League of American Football, the NFL's new international spring league. (AP file photo)
...
Early in his tenure as general manager, Lynn negotiated a controversial contract with the Vikings that granted him 10 percent of luxury suite revenue for every event at the Metrodome, starting in 1982, an agreement that still compensates him 22 years after he resigned from the club.
Talk about a sweet suite deal.
Advertisement
Negotiated while American hostages were still in Iran, Jimmy Carter was in the White House and Terry Bradshaw was the NFL's reigning MVP, the annuity has paid Lynn between $14 million and $20 million over the past 30 years, according to two people with direct knowledge of the contract who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss a confidential agreement.
...
Lynn has rejected at least one buyout offer from subsequent Vikings ownership groups and will continue earning between $700,000 and $1 million each year, the people with direct knowledge said, until the Vikings vacate the Metrodome, most likely in 2014.
Now 76 and in failing health, Lynn declined several interview requests from the Pioneer Press.
He lives in an antebellum mansion in northern Mississippi, assessed at $1.03 million, which he and his wife, Jorja, restored to its original state and opened for tourism. And he has been president of the Oxford University Club at Ole Miss since 2000.
...
Until they move out of the Metrodome, however, the Vikings are unable to seize revenue Lynn continues to draw despite not working for the team since 1990.
...
"That agreement has been very, very good to Mike Lynn," said former team president Gary Woods.
...
The deal was a bone that original Vikings owner Max Winter tossed Lynn in 1979 to reward his protege for helping deliver the publicly funded Metrodome under budget and, possibly, to protect his flank from a ruthless subordinate.
...
"Mr. Lynn is the most complex human being I have ever met in my life," former team lawyer Sam Kaplan testified in 1986.
...
"He was unpredictable, and I thought that an insecure Michael Lynn was not in the best interest of the Minnesota Vikings."
Long before Lynn built NFL rosters, he worked retail at a Dixie-Mart and managed a movie theater in Memphis, Tenn., where he boasted about hosting Elvis Presley and his entourage with late-night showings.
His dream, though, was to work for a professional football team.
In August 1974, Lynn, then 38, wrote Winter a letter asking for a job with the Vikings.
...
Lynn worked for 10 months without a contract for $30,000 before Winter named him general manager on June 1, 1975, at $65,000 a year, according to court records.
...
Three years later, Lynn signed a six-year contract at $125,000 per year. Winter trusted Lynn enough to name him executor of his will.
...
Lynn and his mentor were feuding, and a palace coup was roiling the front office.
BATTLE FOR CONTROL
Lynn, who ran football operations after being promoted to president in 1984, teamed with the heirs of Vikings founders Bill Boyer and H.P. Skoglund to form a majority coalition that marginalized Winter's controlling interest in the team.
...
It is a copy of the Box Suite Agreement, which Lynn signed Dec. 7, 1979, while the Metrodome was being built.
The Keyser Soze of Vikings documents, elusive as the cinematic villain in "The Usual Suspects," is 11 pages of bland contract language that entitles Lynn to his cut for rendering "indispensable and invaluable service" for developing the Metrodome.
...
The deal not only rewarded Lynn with 10 percent of the "adjusted gross income" from all Vikings games but also for all University of Minnesota football games through 2006 and Twins games through 2009. Plus every concert, tractor pull and high school game for which fans have rented suites.
...
Section 4, Paragraph C says "such compensation shall be payable to Lynn for the entire period Vikings Development, or its affiliates, successors and assigns, shall be entitled to manage and lease/sell private box suites in such stadium."
...
Roger Headrick, who succeeded Lynn in the Vikings' front office in January 1991, said the so-called "Gang of 10" ownership group that controlled the team at that time determined the deal was "bulletproof."
...
Gary Woods, team president during Red McCombs' 1998-2005 ownership reign, said the Vikings offered Lynn a lump-sum payment in 1999 in an effort to secure all suite revenue but the sides could not reach an agreement.
...
Lynn's son, Robert, along with Rusty Cooper, manager of the Oxford University Club, said Lynn was seriously ill and unable or unwilling to discuss his suite agreement.
...
LYNN OPPOSED DOME
...
But Lynn was pushing hard for the club to remain outdoors in the suburbs, fueling anxiety that the Vikings might relocate to Phoenix without a new stadium deal.
That infuriated Winter, who was pressured by pro-dome backers to harness Lynn and keep the project on target for Minneapolis.
...
Motivated by respect and fear for Lynn, Winter had Kaplan draw up the Box Suite Agreement.
...
"From time to time, Mr. Winter acknowledged (Lynn) was the best thing that had ever happened to him, that indeed Mr. Lynn was the best general manager in football, and perhaps the best one that had ever come along in football. And at other times he would say that Michael Lynn scared him."
Winter prevailed in his lawsuit over Lynn and eventually sold his Vikings stock to Pohlad and Jacobs, who sued Lynn and accused the general manager of engineering an illegal power play to enrich himself against the interests of the team. Winter prevailed in his lawsuit over Lynn and eventually sold his Vikings stock to Pohlad and Jacobs, who sued Lynn and accused the general manager of engineering an illegal power play to enrich himself against the interests of the team.
...
Lynn eventually sold his Vikings stock to them before Pohlad and Jacobs accepted a $52 million buyout from Headrick's group, which assumed control in 1992.
...
In his final Vikings contract, which expired in January 1991, Lynn had negotiated $1 million in deferred compensation, which the club paid out through 1994. By then, Lynn was two years removed from jet-setting around Europe as the NFL's point man on the World League of American Football, which folded after two seasons.
He settled down in Holly Springs, Miss. Lynn told a newspaper interviewer in 2007 he plowed his investments into restoring the mansion that Jorja, a former Ole Miss beauty queen, told him he would buy her when the couple married in 1968.


The $975 million stadium the Minnesota ...

www.twincities.com [cached]

The $975 million stadium the Minnesota Vikings will begin using in 2016 dooms the Metrodome and the gravy train that has enriched Mike Lynn for three-plus decades. It writes the final chapter in the curious tale of an ambitious executive, a paranoid owner, their dubious deal making and the estrangement that continues to haunt the team.

To Vikings fans of a certain age, Lynn is the dupe responsible for one of the most lopsided trades in sports history.
...
But Lynn was no naif. He was a bare-knuckled
Dec. 20, 1990: Minnesota Vikings general manager Mike Lynn, shown with safety Joey Browner in training camp in August, will step down as general manager on Dec. 31 and will begin devoting all his energy to running the World League of American Football, the NFL's new international spring league. (AP file photo)
...
Early in his tenure as general manager, Lynn negotiated a controversial contract with the Vikings that granted him 10 percent of luxury suite revenue for every event at the Metrodome, starting in 1982, an agreement that still compensates him 22 years after he resigned from the club.
...
in Iran, Jimmy Carter was in the White House and Terry Bradshaw was the NFL's reigning MVP, the annuity has paid Lynn between $14 million and $20 million over the past 30 years, according to two people with direct knowledge of the contract who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss a confidential agreement.
...
Lynn has rejected at least one buyout offer from subsequent Vikings ownership groups and will continue earning between $700,000 and $1 million each year, the people with direct knowledge said, until the Vikings vacate the Metrodome, most likely in 2014.
Now 76 and in failing health, Lynn declined several interview requests from the Pioneer Press.
He lives in an antebellum mansion in northern Mississippi, assessed at $1.03 million, which he and his wife, Jorja, restored to its original state and opened for tourism. And he has been president of the Oxford University Club at Ole Miss since 2000.
...
Until they move out of the Metrodome, however, the Vikings are unable to seize revenue Lynn continues to draw despite not working for the team since 1990.
...
"That agreement has been very, very good to Mike Lynn," said former team president Gary Woods.
...
The deal was a bone that original Vikings owner Max Winter tossed Lynn in 1979 to reward his protege for helping deliver the publicly funded Metrodome under budget and, possibly, to protect his flank from a ruthless subordinate.
...
"Mr. Lynn is the most complex human being I have ever met in my life," former team lawyer Sam Kaplan testified in 1986.
...
"He was unpredictable, and I thought that an insecure Michael Lynn was not in the best interest of the Minnesota Vikings."
Long before Lynn built NFL rosters, he worked retail at a Dixie-Mart and managed a movie theater in Memphis, Tenn., where he boasted about hosting Elvis Presley and his entourage with late-night showings.
His dream, though, was to work for a professional football team.
In August 1974, Lynn, then 38, wrote Winter a letter asking for a job with the Vikings.
...
Lynn worked for 10 months without a contract for $30,000 before Winter named him general manager on June 1, 1975, at $65,000 a year, according to court records.
...
Three years later, Lynn signed a six-year contract at $125,000 per year. Winter trusted Lynn enough to name him executor of his will.
...
Lynn and his mentor were feuding, and a palace coup was roiling the front office.
BATTLE FOR CONTROL
Lynn, who ran football operations after being promoted to president in 1984, teamed with the heirs of Vikings founders Bill Boyer and H.P. Skoglund to form a majority coalition that marginalized Winter's controlling interest in the team.
...
It is a copy of the Box Suite Agreement, which Lynn signed Dec. 7, 1979, while the Metrodome was being built.
The Keyser Soze of Vikings documents, elusive as the cinematic villain in "The Usual Suspects," is 11 pages of bland contract language that entitles Lynn to his cut for rendering "indispensable and invaluable service" for developing the Metrodome.
...
The deal not only rewarded Lynn with 10 percent of the "adjusted gross income" from all Vikings games but also for all University of Minnesota football games through 2006 and Twins games through 2009. Plus every concert, tractor pull and high school game for which fans have rented suites.
...
Section 4, Paragraph C says "such compensation shall be payable to Lynn for the entire period Vikings Development, or its affiliates, successors and assigns, shall be entitled to manage and lease/sell private box suites in such stadium."
...
Roger Headrick, who succeeded Lynn in the Vikings' front office in January 1991, said the so-called "Gang of 10" ownership group that controlled the team at that time determined the deal was "bulletproof."
...
Gary Woods, team president during Red McCombs' 1998-2005 ownership reign, said the Vikings offered Lynn a lump-sum payment in 1999 in an effort to secure all suite revenue but the sides could not reach an agreement.
...
Lynn's son, Robert, along with Rusty Cooper, manager of the Oxford University Club, said Lynn was seriously ill and unable or unwilling to discuss his suite agreement.
...
LYNN OPPOSED DOME
...
But Lynn was pushing hard for the club to remain outdoors in the suburbs, fueling anxiety that the Vikings might relocate to Phoenix without a new stadium deal.
That infuriated Winter, who was pressured by pro-dome backers to harness Lynn and keep the project on target for Minneapolis.
...
Motivated by respect and fear for Lynn, Winter had Kaplan draw up the Box Suite Agreement.
...
"From time to time, Mr. Winter acknowledged (Lynn) was the best thing that had ever happened to him, that indeed Mr. Lynn was the best general manager in football, and perhaps the best one that had ever come along in football. And at other times he would say that Michael Lynn scared him."
Winter prevailed in his lawsuit over Lynn and eventually sold his Vikings stock to Pohlad and Jacobs, who sued Lynn and accused the general manager of engineering an illegal power play to enrich himself against the interests of the team. Winter prevailed in his lawsuit over Lynn and eventually sold his Vikings stock to Pohlad and Jacobs, who sued Lynn and accused the general manager of engineering an illegal power play to enrich himself against the interests of the team.
...
Lynn eventually sold his Vikings stock to them before Pohlad and Jacobs accepted a $52 million buyout from Headrick's group, which assumed control in 1992.
...
In his final Vikings contract, which expired in January 1991, Lynn had negotiated $1 million in deferred compensation, which the club paid out through 1994. By then, Lynn was two years removed from jet-setting around Europe as the NFL's point man on the World League of American Football, which folded after two seasons.
He settled down in Holly Springs, Miss. Lynn told a newspaper interviewer in 2007 he plowed his investments into restoring the mansion that Jorja, a former Ole Miss beauty queen, told him he would buy her when the couple married in 1968.


The $975 million stadium the Minnesota ...

www.twincities.com [cached]

The $975 million stadium the Minnesota Vikings will begin using in 2016 dooms the Metrodome and the gravy train that has enriched Mike Lynn for three-plus decades. It writes the final chapter in the curious tale of an ambitious executive, a paranoid owner, their dubious deal making and the estrangement that continues to haunt the team.

To Vikings fans of a certain age, Lynn is the dupe responsible for one of the most lopsided trades in sports history.
...
But Lynn was no naif. He was a bare-knuckled
Dec. 20, 1990: Minnesota Vikings general manager Mike Lynn, shown with safety Joey Browner in training camp in August, will step down as general manager on Dec. 31 and will begin devoting all his energy to running the World League of American Football, the NFL's new international spring league. (AP file photo)
...
Early in his tenure as general manager, Lynn negotiated a controversial contract with the Vikings that granted him 10 percent of luxury suite revenue for every event at the Metrodome, starting in 1982, an agreement that still compensates him 22 years after he resigned from the club.
...
in Iran, Jimmy Carter was in the White House and Terry Bradshaw was the NFL's reigning MVP, the annuity has paid Lynn between $14 million and $20 million over the past 30 years, according to two people with direct knowledge of the contract who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss a confidential agreement.
...
Lynn has rejected at least one buyout offer from subsequent Vikings ownership groups and will continue earning between $700,000 and $1 million each year, the people with direct knowledge said, until the Vikings vacate the Metrodome, most likely in 2014.
Now 76 and in failing health, Lynn declined several interview requests from the Pioneer Press.
He lives in an antebellum mansion in northern Mississippi, assessed at $1.03 million, which he and his wife, Jorja, restored to its original state and opened for tourism. And he has been president of the Oxford University Club at Ole Miss since 2000.
...
Until they move out of the Metrodome, however, the Vikings are unable to seize revenue Lynn continues to draw despite not working for the team since 1990.
...
"That agreement has been very, very good to Mike Lynn," said former team president Gary Woods.
...
The deal was a bone that original Vikings owner Max Winter tossed Lynn in 1979 to reward his protege for helping deliver the publicly funded Metrodome under budget and, possibly, to protect his flank from a ruthless subordinate.
...
"Mr. Lynn is the most complex human being I have ever met in my life," former team lawyer Sam Kaplan testified in 1986.
...
"He was unpredictable, and I thought that an insecure Michael Lynn was not in the best interest of the Minnesota Vikings."
Long before Lynn built NFL rosters, he worked retail at a Dixie-Mart and managed a movie theater in Memphis, Tenn., where he boasted about hosting Elvis Presley and his entourage with late-night showings.
His dream, though, was to work for a professional football team.
In August 1974, Lynn, then 38, wrote Winter a letter asking for a job with the Vikings.
...
Lynn worked for 10 months without a contract for $30,000 before Winter named him general manager on June 1, 1975, at $65,000 a year, according to court records.
...
Three years later, Lynn signed a six-year contract at $125,000 per year. Winter trusted Lynn enough to name him executor of his will.
...
Lynn and his mentor were feuding, and a palace coup was roiling the front office.
BATTLE FOR CONTROL
Lynn, who ran football operations after being promoted to president in 1984, teamed with the heirs of Vikings founders Bill Boyer and H.P. Skoglund to form a majority coalition that marginalized Winter's controlling interest in the team.
...
It is a copy of the Box Suite Agreement, which Lynn signed Dec. 7, 1979, while the Metrodome was being built.
The Keyser Soze of Vikings documents, elusive as the cinematic villain in "The Usual Suspects," is 11 pages of bland contract language that entitles Lynn to his cut for rendering "indispensable and invaluable service" for developing the Metrodome.
...
The deal not only rewarded Lynn with 10 percent of the "adjusted gross income" from all Vikings games but also for all University of Minnesota football games through 2006 and Twins games through 2009. Plus every concert, tractor pull and high school game for which fans have rented suites.
...
Section 4, Paragraph C says "such compensation shall be payable to Lynn for the entire period Vikings Development, or its affiliates, successors and assigns, shall be entitled to manage and lease/sell private box suites in such stadium."
...
Roger Headrick, who succeeded Lynn in the Vikings' front office in January 1991, said the so-called "Gang of 10" ownership group that controlled the team at that time determined the deal was "bulletproof."
...
Gary Woods, team president during Red McCombs' 1998-2005 ownership reign, said the Vikings offered Lynn a lump-sum payment in 1999 in an effort to secure all suite revenue but the sides could not reach an agreement.
...
Lynn's son, Robert, along with Rusty Cooper, manager of the Oxford University Club, said Lynn was seriously ill and unable or unwilling to discuss his suite agreement.
...
LYNN OPPOSED DOME
...
But Lynn was pushing hard for the club to remain outdoors in the suburbs, fueling anxiety that the Vikings might relocate to Phoenix without a new stadium deal.
That infuriated Winter, who was pressured by pro-dome backers to harness Lynn and keep the project on target for Minneapolis.
...
Motivated by respect and fear for Lynn, Winter had Kaplan draw up the Box Suite Agreement.
...
"From time to time, Mr. Winter acknowledged (Lynn) was the best thing that had ever happened to him, that indeed Mr. Lynn was the best general manager in football, and perhaps the best one that had ever come along in football. And at other times he would say that Michael Lynn scared him."
Winter prevailed in his lawsuit over Lynn and eventually sold his Vikings stock to Pohlad and Jacobs, who sued Lynn and accused the general manager of engineering an illegal power play to enrich himself against the interests of the team. Winter prevailed in his lawsuit over Lynn and eventually sold his Vikings stock to Pohlad and Jacobs, who sued Lynn and accused the general manager of engineering an illegal power play to enrich himself against the interests of the team.
...
Lynn eventually sold his Vikings stock to them before Pohlad and Jacobs accepted a $52 million buyout from Headrick's group, which assumed control in 1992.
...
In his final Vikings contract, which expired in January 1991, Lynn had negotiated $1 million in deferred compensation, which the club paid out through 1994. By then, Lynn was two years removed from jet-setting around Europe as the NFL's point man on the World League of American Football, which folded after two seasons.
He settled down in Holly Springs, Miss. Lynn told a newspaper interviewer in 2007 he plowed his investments into restoring the mansion that Jorja, a former Ole Miss beauty queen, told him he would buy her when the couple married in 1968.


But there can be no question ...

www.northstarwritersforum.com [cached]

But there can be no question that the dark cloud that Winter and Lynn put over the franchise will at long last be lifted in 3+ years' time.

...
I fervently believe the failure to get to the Super Bowl over the last 30+ years is a direct result of having one bad ownership regime after another, and the genesis of that entire timeline was Winter and Lynn.
...
P.S. to Mike Lynn - May you join Max Winter in Hell...
...
The $975 million stadium the Minnesota Vikings will begin using in 2016 dooms the Metrodome and the gravy train that has enriched Mike Lynn for three-plus decades. It writes the final chapter in the curious tale of an ambitious executive, a paranoid owner, their dubious deal making and the estrangement that continues to haunt the team.
To Vikings fans of a certain age, Lynn is the dupe responsible for one of the most lopsided trades in sports history.
...
But Lynn was no naif. He was a bare-knuckled negotiator who played hardball with players, politicians and power brokers.
...
Early in his tenure as general manager, Lynn negotiated a controversial contract with the Vikings that granted him 10 percent of luxury suite revenue for every event at the Metrodome, starting in 1982, an agreement that still compensates him 22 years after he resigned from the club.
Talk about a sweet suite deal.
Negotiated while American hostages were still in Iran, Jimmy Carter was in the White House and Terry Bradshaw was the NFL's reigning MVP, the annuity has paid Lynn between $14 million and $20 million over the past 30 years, according to two people with direct knowledge of the contract who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss a confidential agreement.
...
Lynn has rejected at least one buyout offer from subsequent Vikings ownership groups and will continue earning between $700,000 and $1 million each year, the people with direct knowledge said, until the Vikings vacate the Metrodome, most likely in 2014.
Now 76 and in failing health, Lynn declined several interview requests from the Pioneer Press.
He lives in an antebellum mansion in northern Mississippi, assessed at $1.03 million, which he and his wife, Jorja, restored to its original state and opened for tourism. And he has been president of the Oxford University Club at Ole Miss since 2000.
...
Until they move out of the Metrodome, however, the Vikings are unable to seize revenue Lynn continues to draw despite not working for the team since 1990.
...
"That agreement has been very, very good to Mike Lynn," said former team president Gary Woods.
...
The deal was a bone that original Vikings owner Max Winter tossed Lynn in 1979 to reward his protege for helping deliver the publicly funded Metrodome under budget and, possibly, to protect his flank from a ruthless subordinate.
...
"Mr. Lynn is the most complex human being I have ever met in my life," former team lawyer Sam Kaplan testified in 1986.
...
"He was unpredictable, and I thought that an insecure Michael Lynn was not in the best interest of the Minnesota Vikings."
Long before Lynn built NFL rosters, he worked retail at a Dixie-Mart and managed a movie theater in Memphis, Tenn., where he boasted about hosting Elvis Presley and his entourage with late-night showings.
His dream, though, was to work for a professional football team.
In August 1974, Lynn, then 38, wrote Winter a letter asking for a job with the Vikings.
...
Lynn worked for 10 months without a contract for $30,000 before Winter named him general manager on June 1, 1975, at $65,000 a year, according to court records.
...
Three years later, Lynn signed a six-year contract at $125,000 per year. Winter trusted Lynn enough to name him executor of his will.
...
Lynn and his mentor were feuding, and a palace coup was roiling the front office.
BATTLE FOR CONTROL
Lynn, who ran football operations after being promoted to president in 1984, teamed with the heirs of Vikings founders Bill Boyer and H.P. Skoglund to form a majority coalition that marginalized Winter's controlling interest in the team.
...
It is a copy of the Box Suite Agreement, which Lynn signed Dec. 7, 1979, while the Metrodome was being built.
The Keyser Soze of Vikings documents, elusive as the cinematic villain in "The Usual Suspects," is 11 pages of bland contract language that entitles Lynn to his cut for rendering "indispensable and invaluable service" for developing the Metrodome.
...
The deal not only rewarded Lynn with 10 percent of the "adjusted gross income" from all Vikings games but also for all University of Minnesota football games through 2006 and Twins games through 2009. Plus every concert, tractor pull and high school game for which fans have rented suites.
...
Section 4, Paragraph C says "such compensation shall be payable to Lynn for the entire period Vikings Development, or its affiliates, successors and assigns, shall be entitled to manage and lease/sell private box suites in such stadium."
...
Roger Headrick, who succeeded Lynn in the Vikings' front office in January 1991, said the so-called "Gang of 10" ownership group that controlled the team at that time determined the deal was "bulletproof."
...
Gary Woods, team president during Red McCombs' 1998-2005 ownership reign, said the Vikings offered Lynn a lump-sum payment in 1999 in an effort to secure all suite revenue but the sides could not reach an agreement.
...
Lynn's son, Robert, along with Rusty Cooper, manager of the Oxford University Club, said Lynn was seriously ill and unable or unwilling to discuss his suite agreement.
...
LYNN OPPOSED DOME
...
But Lynn was pushing hard for the club to remain outdoors in the suburbs, fueling anxiety that the Vikings might relocate to Phoenix without a new stadium deal.
That infuriated Winter, who was pressured by pro-dome backers to harness Lynn and keep the project on target for Minneapolis.
...
Motivated by respect and fear for Lynn, Winter had Kaplan draw up the Box Suite Agreement.
...
"From time to time, Mr. Winter acknowledged (Lynn) was the best thing that had ever happened to him, that indeed Mr. Lynn was the best general manager in football, and perhaps the best one that had ever come along in football. And at other times he would say that Michael Lynn scared him."
Winter prevailed in his lawsuit over Lynn and eventually sold his Vikings stock to Pohlad and Jacobs, who sued Lynn and accused the general manager of engineering an illegal power play to enrich himself against the interests of the team. Winter prevailed in his lawsuit over Lynn and eventually sold his Vikings stock to Pohlad and Jacobs, who sued Lynn and accused the general manager of engineering an illegal power play to enrich himself against the interests of the team.
...
Lynn eventually sold his Vikings stock to them before Pohlad and Jacobs accepted a $52 million buyout from Headrick's group, which assumed control in 1992.
...
In his final Vikings contract, which expired in January 1991, Lynn had negotiated $1 million in deferred compensation, which the club paid out through 1994. By then, Lynn was two years removed from jet-setting around Europe as the NFL's point man on the World League of American Football, which folded after two seasons.
He settled down in Holly Springs, Miss. Lynn told a newspaper interviewer in 2007 he plowed his investments into restoring the mansion that Jorja, a former Ole Miss beauty queen, told him he would buy her when the couple married in 1968.


But there can be no question ...

www.northstarwritersforum.com [cached]

But there can be no question that the dark cloud that Winter and Lynn put over the franchise will at long last be lifted in 3+ years' time.

...
I fervently believe the failure to get to the Super Bowl over the last 30+ years is a direct result of having one bad ownership regime after another, and the genesis of that entire timeline was Winter and Lynn.
...
P.S. to Mike Lynn - May you join Max Winter in Hell...
...
The $975 million stadium the Minnesota Vikings will begin using in 2016 dooms the Metrodome and the gravy train that has enriched Mike Lynn for three-plus decades. It writes the final chapter in the curious tale of an ambitious executive, a paranoid owner, their dubious deal making and the estrangement that continues to haunt the team.
To Vikings fans of a certain age, Lynn is the dupe responsible for one of the most lopsided trades in sports history.
...
But Lynn was no naif. He was a bare-knuckled negotiator who played hardball with players, politicians and power brokers.
...
Early in his tenure as general manager, Lynn negotiated a controversial contract with the Vikings that granted him 10 percent of luxury suite revenue for every event at the Metrodome, starting in 1982, an agreement that still compensates him 22 years after he resigned from the club.
Talk about a sweet suite deal.
Negotiated while American hostages were still in Iran, Jimmy Carter was in the White House and Terry Bradshaw was the NFL's reigning MVP, the annuity has paid Lynn between $14 million and $20 million over the past 30 years, according to two people with direct knowledge of the contract who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss a confidential agreement.
...
Lynn has rejected at least one buyout offer from subsequent Vikings ownership groups and will continue earning between $700,000 and $1 million each year, the people with direct knowledge said, until the Vikings vacate the Metrodome, most likely in 2014.
Now 76 and in failing health, Lynn declined several interview requests from the Pioneer Press.
He lives in an antebellum mansion in northern Mississippi, assessed at $1.03 million, which he and his wife, Jorja, restored to its original state and opened for tourism. And he has been president of the Oxford University Club at Ole Miss since 2000.
...
Until they move out of the Metrodome, however, the Vikings are unable to seize revenue Lynn continues to draw despite not working for the team since 1990.
...
"That agreement has been very, very good to Mike Lynn," said former team president Gary Woods.
...
The deal was a bone that original Vikings owner Max Winter tossed Lynn in 1979 to reward his protege for helping deliver the publicly funded Metrodome under budget and, possibly, to protect his flank from a ruthless subordinate.
...
"Mr. Lynn is the most complex human being I have ever met in my life," former team lawyer Sam Kaplan testified in 1986.
...
"He was unpredictable, and I thought that an insecure Michael Lynn was not in the best interest of the Minnesota Vikings."
Long before Lynn built NFL rosters, he worked retail at a Dixie-Mart and managed a movie theater in Memphis, Tenn., where he boasted about hosting Elvis Presley and his entourage with late-night showings.
His dream, though, was to work for a professional football team.
In August 1974, Lynn, then 38, wrote Winter a letter asking for a job with the Vikings.
...
Lynn worked for 10 months without a contract for $30,000 before Winter named him general manager on June 1, 1975, at $65,000 a year, according to court records.
...
Three years later, Lynn signed a six-year contract at $125,000 per year. Winter trusted Lynn enough to name him executor of his will.
...
Lynn and his mentor were feuding, and a palace coup was roiling the front office.
BATTLE FOR CONTROL
Lynn, who ran football operations after being promoted to president in 1984, teamed with the heirs of Vikings founders Bill Boyer and H.P. Skoglund to form a majority coalition that marginalized Winter's controlling interest in the team.
...
It is a copy of the Box Suite Agreement, which Lynn signed Dec. 7, 1979, while the Metrodome was being built.
The Keyser Soze of Vikings documents, elusive as the cinematic villain in "The Usual Suspects," is 11 pages of bland contract language that entitles Lynn to his cut for rendering "indispensable and invaluable service" for developing the Metrodome.
...
The deal not only rewarded Lynn with 10 percent of the "adjusted gross income" from all Vikings games but also for all University of Minnesota football games through 2006 and Twins games through 2009. Plus every concert, tractor pull and high school game for which fans have rented suites.
...
Section 4, Paragraph C says "such compensation shall be payable to Lynn for the entire period Vikings Development, or its affiliates, successors and assigns, shall be entitled to manage and lease/sell private box suites in such stadium."
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Roger Headrick, who succeeded Lynn in the Vikings' front office in January 1991, said the so-called "Gang of 10" ownership group that controlled the team at that time determined the deal was "bulletproof."
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Gary Woods, team president during Red McCombs' 1998-2005 ownership reign, said the Vikings offered Lynn a lump-sum payment in 1999 in an effort to secure all suite revenue but the sides could not reach an agreement.
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Lynn's son, Robert, along with Rusty Cooper, manager of the Oxford University Club, said Lynn was seriously ill and unable or unwilling to discuss his suite agreement.
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LYNN OPPOSED DOME
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But Lynn was pushing hard for the club to remain outdoors in the suburbs, fueling anxiety that the Vikings might relocate to Phoenix without a new stadium deal.
That infuriated Winter, who was pressured by pro-dome backers to harness Lynn and keep the project on target for Minneapolis.
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Motivated by respect and fear for Lynn, Winter had Kaplan draw up the Box Suite Agreement.
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"From time to time, Mr. Winter acknowledged (Lynn) was the best thing that had ever happened to him, that indeed Mr. Lynn was the best general manager in football, and perhaps the best one that had ever come along in football. And at other times he would say that Michael Lynn scared him."
Winter prevailed in his lawsuit over Lynn and eventually sold his Vikings stock to Pohlad and Jacobs, who sued Lynn and accused the general manager of engineering an illegal power play to enrich himself against the interests of the team. Winter prevailed in his lawsuit over Lynn and eventually sold his Vikings stock to Pohlad and Jacobs, who sued Lynn and accused the general manager of engineering an illegal power play to enrich himself against the interests of the team.
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Lynn eventually sold his Vikings stock to them before Pohlad and Jacobs accepted a $52 million buyout from Headrick's group, which assumed control in 1992.
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In his final Vikings contract, which expired in January 1991, Lynn had negotiated $1 million in deferred compensation, which the club paid out through 1994. By then, Lynn was two years removed from jet-setting around Europe as the NFL's point man on the World League of American Football, which folded after two seasons.
He settled down in Holly Springs, Miss. Lynn told a newspaper interviewer in 2007 he plowed his investments into restoring the mansion that Jorja, a former Ole Miss beauty queen, told him he would buy her when the couple married in 1968.

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