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Wrong Miguel Fortes?

Miguel D. Fortes

SeagrassNet Principal Investigator

Marine Science Institute

HQ Phone:  (650) 364-2760

Email: m***@***.org

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Marine Science Institute

500 Discovery Parkway

Redwood City, California,94063

United States

Company Description

The Marine Science Institute was founded in 1970, around the time that the issue of water resources was becoming a major concern for many Bay Area inhabitants. The Institute's philosophy was founded on the idea that putting students in direct physical contact ...more

Background Information

Employment History

International Officer

University of the Philippines


Manager, Team

SeagrassNet


Manager, UNESCO Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission Regional Secretariat

Western Pacific


Head of Office

UNESCO


Affiliations

Society for Conservation Biology

Board Member


Web References(38 Total References)


Miguel Fortes | SeagrassNet

www.seagrassnet.org [cached]

Miguel Fortes
SeagrassNet principal investigator Marine Science Institute CS University of the Philippines


Philippines seagrass

www.seagrasswatch.org [cached]

Principal watchers: Rochelle Balitaan, Dr. Miguel Fortes (Marine Science Institute), Mr. Luisito Peliòo & Puerto Galera Academy students


www.aklanon.net

, Prof. Miguel D. Fortes (Marine Science Institute, University of the Philippines Diliman)


mccn.org.au

Dr. Miguel Fortes, a marine scientist and professor of marine science at the UPMSI, said that of the marine habitats, corals are the most popular, mangroves the most disturbed and seagrass beds the least studied.Back to Contents


Seagrass-Watch | seagrass news 2007 archives

www.seagrasswatch.org [cached]

Dr. Miguel Fortes, a marine scientist and professor of marine science at the UPMSI, said that of the marine habitats, corals are the most popular, mangroves the most disturbed and seagrass beds the least studied.
Fortes said in the past, studies on the three marine ecosystems were done separately but "evidence shows the connection between them, that if you destroy mangroves, you destroy corals, and you destroy seagrass beds. Except the Philippines, the other countries shared common problems like the lack of good assessment of seagrass beds, including the factors that destroy them. The Philippines has also the most seagrass species, "but only maybe because more studies have been conducted here," Fortes said. Bolinao trip The participants were brought to an exposure trip to the flat reefs of Cape Bolinao where coral reefs abound and where the largest concentration of seagrass beds in the country (22,500 square kilometers, 10 species) is found. Fortes said seagrass beds and coral reefs should be considered as a macro-system of the tropical world that needs an integrated approach for management and protection. But seagrass beds have not been given much attention because "they are grass and not as attractive as the colorful corals," he said. "But they are as useful as corals," said Fortes, who has been studying seagrass for 20 years. Some fish need both seagrass meadows and coral reefs to thrive, Fortes said. He gave as an example the rabbit fish which residents of this town make into padas (bagoong) when in juvenile stage, and into danggit (sun dried) when in adult stage. "Some species of rabbit fish spawn in sea bed about 12 kilometers from shore. The young fish are herbivores and graze at seagrass beds but when they are sexually mature, they stay at coral reefs," he said. Other species of rabbit fish stay at mangrove areas. But the seagrass, though hardy, is also affected by environmental degradation, Fortes said.


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