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Wrong Michael Wargovich?

Michael J. Wargovich

Cancer Center Council Distinguished Chair In Oncology

University of Texas Health Science Center

HQ Phone:  (210) 567-7000

Direct Phone: (210) ***-****direct phone

Email: w***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

University of Texas Health Science Center

7703 Floyd Curl Drive Mail Code 7776

San Antonio, Texas,78229

United States

Company Description

The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio is the leading research institution in South Texas and one of the major health sciences universities in the world. With an operating budget of $668 million, the Health Science Center is the chief cat...more

Background Information

Employment History

Director of Basic Research for South Carolina Cancer Center

Palmetto Health


Web References(117 Total References)


cancer - Scientific Literature

www.scientificliterature.org [cached]

Michael J. Wargovich, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, USA


SIO2016 to Feature Plenary on Translational Research on Natural Products

integrativeonc.org [cached]

The natural products plenary, on November 6, will include: The plenary session on natural products will feature Peiying Yang, PhD, of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, as moderator and panelists Nagi Kumar, PhD, RD, FADA, of the Moffitt Cancer Center; Michael J. Wargovich, PhD, FACN, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Texas; and Robert S. Chapkin, PhD, of Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas.
Michael J. Wargovich, PhD, FACN, Professor of Molecular Medicine and Cancer Center Council Distinguished Chair in Oncology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. Dr. Wargovich co-leads the Cancer Prevention and Population Science Program for the NCI-designated Cancer Therapy and Research Center and holds the Cancer Center Council Distinguished Chair in Oncology at the University of Texas. An internationally known academic researcher in nutrition and disease prevention who has conducted seminal research in nutrition and cancer prevention, he received his PhD in Microbiology at Texas Tech University and completed post-doctoral studies at the Ontario Cancer Institute in Toronto, Canada.


Scientific Program Committee

integrativeonc.org [cached]

Michael Wargovich, PhD
Scientific Review Committee Co-Chair University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio


www.mysanantonio.com

Michael Wargovich, a molecular medicine professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, is studying foods with anti-inflammatory properties, including fruits, vegetables, spices and herbs, to see how they could aid in the fight against cancer. Read the story here. Here's a list, compiled by Wargovich, of foods with anti-inflammatory chemicals. Photo: TOM REEL, San Antonio Express-News
Michael Wargovich, a molecular medicine professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, is studying foods with anti-inflammatory properties, including fruits, vegetables, spices and herbs, to see how they could aid in the fight against cancer. Read the story here. Michael Wargovich, a molecular medicine professor at the University... Michael Wargovich, a molecular medicine professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, is studying foods with anti-inflammatory properties, including fruits, vegetables, spices and herbs, to see how they could aid in the fight against cancer. Here's a list, compiled...


www.mysanantonio.com

Michael Wargovich, a professor of molecular medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center, displays a small bag of mixed plant life remedies as he talks about his research on foods that inhibit cancer. Wargovich is studying foods with anti-inflammatory properties, including fruits, vegetables, spices and herbs. Photo: Tom Reel / San Antonio Express-News
Michael Wargovich, a professor of molecular medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center, displays a small bag of mixed plant life remedies as he talks about his research on foods that inhibit cancer. Wargovich is studying foods with anti-inflammatory properties, including fruits, vegetables, spices and herbs. Michael Wargovich, a professor of molecular medicine at the... Source: Professor Michael Wargovich Cancer Therapy & Research Center Twigs, leaves and berries may sound like the diet of the destitute, but for molecular medicine professor Michael Wargovich, certain plants - like those in traditional medicines and food in developing countries - could be gold mines in the fight against cancer. In his newly outfitted lab at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Wargovich and his staff are testing the cancer-preventing properties of green tea. They'll also soon start investigating the anti-inflammatory abilities of the neem tree, native to India , and which already is used in some toothpastes available in the United States. Wargovich, 60, cited World Health Organization statistics showing that the hot spots for cancer will move south of the equator by 2020 as the population swells and its residents, immunized from many infectious diseases, live longer and assume a more Western lifestyle. "They're giving up their traditional diets," he said. "The things that we've found are protecting us against cancer are disappearing as everybody tries to be homogenized and Western and going to fast-food places." He said undetectable chronic inflammation sets people up for illnesses such as heart disease, cancer, obesity and diabetes. Yet foods with anti-inflammatory properties - fruits, vegetables, spices and herbs - are disappearing from the world's plate. As a side project, Wargovich and an executive chef are developing an anti-inflammatory diet to reintegrate beneficial foods into modern-day dining. In April, Wargovich will give a free public lecture about cancer-fighting foods. Visit the Cancer Therapy & Research Center's website, CTRC.net, where details will be listed soon. Back in his lab, he excitedly pops open plastic containers full of dried foliage, such as neem and the West African "headache plant," Bridelia ferruginea, which he admits looks like debris he swept off his driveway. He said he met with healers in Guinea to learn about plants in traditional medicines. In the case of the "headache plant," suffering clients boil it and inhale the steam. "I'm just delighted to find that what we're told as general advice from grandparents and people from other cultures had a grain of truth in it," he said. Also interested in how plant compounds can reduce the side effects of current cancer therapies, Wargovich said he will start a clinical trial in South Carolina to test whether a neem mouthwash helps sooth painful mouth inflammation that occurs after patients with head and neck cancers begin therapy. "The state of the art in 2013 from the oncologist is to put ice chips in your mouth and suck it up or they bomb you on narcotics to lessen the pain," Wargovich said, adding that combining a prevention chemical with therapy is "going to be the frontier for us." In another experiment, he said, they are applying the antioxidant found in green tea to cancer cells to figure out how the compound inhibits cancer cell growth. Wargovich likens a cancer cell to a car without brakes. Twigs, leaves and berries may sound like the diet of the destitute, but for molecular medicine professor Michael Wargovich, certain plants - like those in traditional medicines and food in developing countries - could be gold mines in the fight against cancer. Wargovich, 60, cited World...


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