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Wrong Michael Finegan?

Michael B. Finegan

Lead Psychologist

Maryland-State-Police-Department

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Maryland State Police Department

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Background Information

Employment History

Peninsula Mental Health 2016


Position, Prior Service

Ocean City Police Department Hostage Negotiation Team


Executive Director

Peninsula Health


Executive Director

Peninsula Mental Health Services Inc


Affiliations

International Association of Chiefs of Police Inc

Member of the Psychological Services Section


Peninsula Regional Medical Center

Clinical Psychologist


Psychiatry atPeninsula Regional Medical Center

Member of the Department


Education

Ph.D.

Texas Research Institute of Mental Science


Ph.D.

Texas Research Institute of MentalScience


Ph.D.

clinical psychology

University of Minnesota Medical Center


Web References(40 Total References)


Staff - Peninsula Mental Health Peninsula Mental Health

peninsulamentalhealthservices.com [cached]

Michael B. Finegan, Ph.D.
Michael B. Finegan, Ph.D. Michael Finegan, Ph.D., is the Executive Director of Peninsula Mental Health and its divisions, which include Peninsula Addiction Services, Peninsula Police Services and Peninsula Day Treatment Services. Dr. Finegan received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology in 1984. He served his APA Clinical Psychology Internship at the University of Minnesota Medical Center and completed a Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Geriatric Clinical Psychology at the Texas Medical Center. Beginning with his first experience working with law enforcement at the Utah State Prison in 1983, Dr. Finegan has progressively dedicated more time to serving the special needs of law enforcement. Dr. Finegan also serves as Lead Psychologist for the Maryland State Police, heading a statewide emergency response team involved in critical incidents. His clinical interest focuses on treatment of trauma as well as mood and anxiety disorders. Internationally, he has served as a volunteer in responding to disasters in India, Sri Lanka and Haiti. He is a frequent guest on local CBS and ABC affiliate stations and has also been featured nationally on NBC's Dateline, CNN Headline News and the Washington Post.


History - Peninsula Mental Health Peninsula Mental Health

peninsulamentalhealthservices.com [cached]

Beginning in 1983, Dr. Michael Finegan trained with law enforcement while serving a clinical rotation at the Utah State Prison.
Upon completion of a second year of training at the University of Minnesota Medical Center he graduated in 1984 with a Ph.D. in clinical psychology. Before moving to Maryland's Eastern Shore in 1985, Dr. Finegan completed an additional year of fellowship training at the Texas Medical Center Research Institute of Mental Sciences in Houston. Dr. Finegan's experiences in treating trauma victims in India following the assassination of Gandhi in 1984 led to his interest in psychological trauma. Additionally, hearing the first hand accounts of United States Department Personnel dealing with the aftermath of the Beirut Marine Corp. disaster were early experiences that led Dr. Finegan toward a specialized interest in serving the organizations and individuals that protect society. Over the years he has progressively dedicated more time to serving the special needs of law enforcement. In 1993 Dr. Finegan's psychological and psychiatric practice developed the first formal relationship with a police department providing applicant selection services and psychological care for impaired officers. Providing Fitness for Duty services for the Maryland State Police followed. Since 2003, Dr. Finegan has served as the lead psychologist for the Maryland State Police.


Maryland Trauma Specialist Brings Hope to Children

crs.org [cached]

Dr. Michael Finegan.Dr. Michael Finegan distributes coloring books to tsunami-affected children in Galle, Sri Lanka.Photo by CRS StaffDr. Michael Finegan is the lead psychologist for the Maryland State Police Department.During the month of January he volunteered with Catholic Relief Services to bring trauma counseling to tens of thousands of children in Sri Lanka, where more than 28,000 were killed by the tsunami.Dr. Finegan spent most of his time in Galle, a city on the southern tip of the island nation that suffered more than 4,200 fatalities from the tsunami.He met with the doctors and nurses at the Karapitiya Hospital in Galle, the largest hospital in the region and site of some of the most tragic scenes in the hours after the wave hit.In total, the hospital received more than 6,000 admissions in the 36 hours after the tsunami struck, 1,300 of them dead on arrival.Because it was impossible to meet with all of those directly traumatized by the disaster, Dr. Finegan trained religious leaders, healthcare workers and teachers to understand the unique demands placed on those working with a highly traumatized population.Among those most traumatized by the tsunami are children who witnessed the horror.Because children are often unwilling or unable to express their grief and fears as adults do, Dr. Finegan armed himself with 20,000 drawing books and crayons from Catholic Relief Services and got to work with children and their parents in the relief camps around Galle."When fear becomes a major factor in children's lives, it impacts their development," Dr. Finegan explained."Given a blank sheet of paper, and children will express fear and loss through drawing, and that helps in the process of recovery."Dr. Finegan asked children to draw pictures of what happened during the tsunami, what is happening in their lives now and what they see in their future.Their pictures told a story of enormous loss.But most, he said, drew a future of blue skies and happy faces.


CRS : Rebuilding Hope After the Tsunami

tsunamiresponse.crs.org [cached]

Dr. Michael Finegan is the lead psychologist for the Maryland State Police Department.During the month of January he volunteered with Catholic Relief Services to bring trauma counseling to tens of thousands of children in Sri Lanka, where more than 28,000 were killed by the tsunami.Dr. Finegan spent most of his time in Galle, a city on the southern tip of the island nation that suffered more than 4,200 fatalities from the tsunami.He met with the doctors and nurses at the Karapitiya Hospital in Galle, the largest hospital in the region and site of some of the most tragic scenes in the hours after the wave hit.In total, the hospital received more than 6,000 admissions in the 36 hours after the tsunami struck, 1,300 of them dead on arrival.Because it was impossible to meet with all of those directly traumatized by the disaster, Dr. Finegan trained religious leaders, healthcare workers and teachers to understand the unique demands placed on those working with a highly traumatized population.Among those most traumatized by the tsunami are children who witnessed the horror.Because children are often unwilling or unable to express their grief and fears as adults do, Dr. Finegan armed himself with 20,000 drawing books and crayons from Catholic Relief Services and got to work with children and their parents in the relief camps around Galle."When fear becomes a major factor in children's lives, it impacts their development," Dr. Finegan explained."Given a blank sheet of paper, and children will express fear and loss through drawing, and that helps in the process of recovery."Dr. Finegan asked children to draw pictures of what happened during the tsunami, what is happening in their lives now and what they see in their future.Their pictures told a story of enormous loss.But most, he said, drew a future of blue skies and happy faces.More Stories from Sri Lanka BACK TO TOP Dr. Michael Finegan, lead psychologist for the Maryland State Police Department, distributes coloring books to tsunami-affected children in Galle, Sri Lanka.


Volunteer Profile: Maryland Trauma Specialist Brings Hope to Sri Lanka's Children | Catholic Relief Services

www.catholicrelief.net [cached]

Dr. Michael Finegan is the lead psychologist for the Maryland State Police Department.During the month of January he volunteered with Catholic Relief Services to bring trauma counseling to tens of thousands of children in Sri Lanka, where more than 28,000 were killed by the tsunami. Dr. Finegan spent most of his time in Galle, a city on Sri Lanka's southern tip that suffered more than 4,200 fatalities from the tsunami.On the day he arrived, Dr. Finegan met with hundreds of doctors and nurses at the Karapitiya Hospital in Galle, the largest hospital in the region and site of some of the most tragic scenes in the hours after the wave hit.In total, the hospital received more than 6,000 admissions in the 36 hours after the tsunami struck, 1,300 of them dead on arrival.To ensure that communities have the capacity to help survivors through the crisis, Dr. Finegan trained community leaders, healthcare workers and teachers to understand the unique demands placed on those working with a highly traumatized population.Among those most traumatized by the tsunami are children who witnessed the horror.Because children are often unwilling or unable to express their grief and fears as adults do, Dr. Finegan armed himself with 20,000 drawing books and crayons from Catholic Relief Services and got to work with children and their parents in the relief camps around Galle."When fear becomes a major factor in children's lives, it impacts their development," Dr. Finegan explained."Given a blank sheet of paper, children will express fear and loss through drawing, and that helps in the process of recovery."Dr. Finegan asked children to draw pictures of what happened during the tsunami, what is happening in their lives now and what they see in their future.Their pictures told a story of unspeakable tragedy.But most, he said, drew a future of blue skies and happy faces.


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