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Wrong Michael Feuer?

Michael H. Feuer

Co-Founder and Co-Chief Executive Officer

Max-Wellness LLC

HQ Phone:  (216) 765-2500

Direct Phone: (216) ***-****direct phone

Email: m***@***.com

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Max-Wellness LLC

4400 Renaissance Parkway Suite 4

Cleveland, Ohio,44128

United States

Background Information

Employment History

Contributor

Small Business News


Chief Executive Officer

Warrensville Heights City Schools


Chairman and, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder

Legacy Bank


Chairman and, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder

Open Solutions Inc.


Chairman and, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder

Fairport Savings Bank


Chairman and, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder

Seneca Falls Savings Bank


Chairman and, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder

Paragon Federal Credit Union


Chairman and, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder

San Angelo National Bank


Chairman and, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder

The First National Bank of Ipswich


Chairman and, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder

PINNACLE FINANCIAL PARTNERS INC


Chairman and, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder

First Nation Bank


Chairman and, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder

Woodforest National Bank


President, Office Max

Certified Mail


Qwest Communications International Inc.


Chairman

CEO and Co-Founder of OfficeMax


Fabri-Centers of America


Affiliations

Western Reserve Partners LLC

Board of Advisors Member


OfficeMax Inc.

Cofounder


Search

Founder


HME company

Founder


Cleveland Leadership Center

Board Member


University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Member, Board


The Taylor Institute

Board Member


Newest Venture Max-Wellness

Founder


DataNetwork Inc

Founder


United Way Services

Board Member


PsyMax Solutions LLC

Chief Executive Officer


Cleveland Live , Inc.

Founder, Founder


Menorah Park Center for Senior Living

Board of Trustees


Cuyahoga Community College

Board of Trustees


Wal-Mart Stores , Inc.

Vice Chairman


Shaker Heights

Founder


Case Western Reserve University Weatherhead School of Management and University of Pittsburgh Katz Business School

Member of the Advisory Councils


Max-Ventures

Chief Executive Officer


Web References(150 Total References)


Breakthrough Innovation | SoundviewPro Online Course

www.soundviewpro.com [cached]

Michael Feuer, the co-founder of OfficeMax, and successful entrepreneur will teach you how to break the bottleneck by having the leadership courage to dare, dream and do.
Michael Feuer All Courses, Michael Feuer is the co-founder of OfficeMax and in this course, you'll learn the techniques for breakthrough innovation. Feuer also reveals why it's not necessarily always the best move to be a pioneer in your industry. Class three helps you to put your innovation plans into motion. Feuer stresses the need to act now and be creative, as well as innovative. Michael Feuer Michael Feuer has more than 35 years experience as a corporate executive, entrepreneur, management consultant, venture capitalist, syndicated columnist and author. Feuer is the author of The Benevolent Dictator. He is the co-founder and former chairman and CEO of OfficeMax. He sold OfficeMax in December 2003 for $1.5 billion. In 2010, he launched Max-Wellness, a retail chain and Internet health and wellness concept featuring products for "head to toe" care.


psychology of leadership Archives - The Psychology of Wellbeing

psychologyofwellbeing.com [cached]

Michael Feuer, CEO, Max-Wellness
Business (and Psychology) Lessons from the CEO's


The Tuesday Barter Report - November 15, 2011

barternews.com [cached]

According to OfficeMax cofounder, former CEO, and serial entrepreneur Michael Feuer (pronounced Foyer), innovations in communication sometimes make it more difficult to get the point across.
Since we can say as much as we want in multiple forums these days, almost everyone including businesspeople provide TMI (too much information) in their exchanges, points out Feuer, author of the new book The Benevolent Dictator: Empower Your Employees, Build Your Business, and Outwit the Competition . In many organizations, the art of cutting to the chase has been lost. Feuer knows what hes talking about: he has been involved with launching a number of business ventures, including OfficeMax and Max-Wellness, a recently launched only-one-of-its-kind health and wellness retail chain concept. The lessons hes learned have convinced him that a great leaders management style should mirror that of a benevolent dictator, which is not as scary as it sounds. Because at the end of the day, the dictator side of you calls the shots and makes the difficult decisions, but your benevolent side does so while putting the interests of the organization and your customers ahead of your own. And part of being a benevolent dictator is requiring clear, concise communication at all levels, so that key decisions can be made quickly and effectively. Before todays instant transmission of words and numbers by lightning-fast speed, you had to talk to your boss in person, on the phone, or in a hard copy report, Feuer explains. Feuer advises. Also consider asking your employees to end all conversations and messages with a tagline that expresses your organizations best attribute, suggests Feuer. No, you shouldnt do your teams work for them, but according to Feuer, you should get regular (and of course, succinct!) updates from key people. These fast-and-frequent communications allow you to keep your finger on your organizations pulse. When you know whats happening in real time, you can accelerate your organizations growth and prevent garden-variety problems from snowballing into disasters of Biblical proportions, explains Feuer. Many leaders think that this style is more forceful and expedient, but its actually counterproductive, says Feuer. Delivering a serious concern about sales would be an inappropriate announcement to make at an awards event, for instance, says Feuer. Knowing when to say the right thing will lend your message credibility and significance. Yes, there will always be some people who will require the ton-of-bricks approach when it comes to giving and receiving appropriate communication, concludes Feuer. But if youre open about the level of succinctness that you want and model those behaviors yourself, youll find that most of your team will get on board quickly. And chances are, theyll also be grateful that youve cut out all the background noise. Michael Feuer cofounded OfficeMax in 1988 starting with one store and $20,000 of his own money, a partner, and a small group of investors. As CEO, he grew it to more than 1,000 stores worldwide with annual sales topping $5 billion. He is also CEO of Max-Ventures, a venture capital and retail consulting firm, and founder and CEO of Max-Wellness, a comprehensive health and wellness retail chain launched in 2010.


SMB Tips on Moving Your Idea to the Marketplace - SMB Opportunities - SMBnow.com

www.smbnow.com [cached]

But according to Michael Feuer, cofounder and former CEO of OfficeMax, the iron is not just hot; it's smoking.
And if you don't strike now, someone else just might beat you to it. "The perfect time to make your move is when everyone else is afraid to," says Feuer, author of the new book The Benevolent Dictator: Empower Your Employees, Build Your Business, and Outwit the Competition (Wiley, 2011, ISBN: 978-1-118-00391-6, $24.95,www.benevolentdictator.biz). "It's a lot like investing in the stock market-once everyone else starts jumping on the bandwagon, you've missed the window." The truth is, says Feuer (pronounced "Foyer"), entrepreneurial success isn't rocket science. It's not as scary as it sounds, Feuer assures readers. The "benevolent" part means always putting the entity, the employees, and, most importantly, the customer, first. In other words, you're focused foremost on doing the right thing for the right reasons, for all stakeholders. The "dictator" piece simply means that somebody in a new venture (i.e., you) has to recognize when debate, conversation, and analysis can't take you any farther. At that time you have to decide, "We're taking this fork in the road, for better or worse, and it's on my head." "With both OfficeMax and Max-Wellness, being the benevolent dictator provided the critical leadership necessary to take an idea and transform it into reality as fast as possible," says Feuer. "Asking is certainly much more difficult than getting; however, it becomes much easier if you can learn how to make a strong presentation and tell your story," notes Feuer. "Attention, interest, desire, and action are the key elements of selling-you can ask for or tell just about anything as long as you do so honestly and spell out the good, the bad, and the ugly." "No" means "maybe. The word "no" is just a synonym for "maybe. Feuer writes that this realization led him to train his teams to comprehend that the "no" you receive the first nine times is merely a disguised "maybe"-because the other guy is looking for a reason why not to proceed, or doesn't understand what you're asking. It's only after the tenth time-when the other person hangs up on you or walks out of the room and slams the door-that "no" really means "no." "I've seen it over and over: Hearing 'no' simply means that you haven't effectively or passionately explained what you need-or adequately expressed how your success will translate to their success," says Feuer. Feuer explains that at OfficeMax he had an army of customer service reps who were trained to do the right thing for the customer the first time around. Still, periodically, tenacious customers who were outraged by a perceived transgression made it their mission to reach the CEO directly. It was during those phone conversations that Feuer truly learned what listening to the customer really meant. "I would identify myself when I answered my phone, and the irate caller would, many times, launch into histrionics," he recalls. Feuer explains that he always incorporated this mindset into his SMB plans, right down to his daily activities. He'd start the day by handling his most difficult or unpleasant tasks first. With those out of the way, he'd take a management walkabout checking with staff members at all levels. Then he'd move on to thinking time, meeting with colleagues, or sometimes just schmoozing, bonding, or focusing on new and better ways to get things done. "I always tried to teach through my own example that the journey for everyone should be as much fun as the destination," says Feuer. "If there is a voice in your head that sounds like your mother and it's advising you not to hire a certain candidate, the voice is probably just your entrepreneurial instinct telling you to proceed with caution," says Feuer. "But beyond what I call the Mother Rule, there are ways to get job candidates to reveal their own crucial character traits. "One way I vet candidates is to ask them to provide a letter of interest outlining why they think they can get the job done, and what it would take to get them to join the organization," he adds. "Whether you have hit your stride or have reached a milestone, it's imperative to remember one thing: If you don't remain hungry to achieve continued success, you'll soon find yourself believing that you are as great as your last success," notes Feuer. "The key to fulfillment and continued success is knowing how and when to reinvent one's SMB and even personal life," says Feuer. "It's all about looking for that new twist or turn that might ignite a new burning in the belly. "That time arrived for me when I decided to sell OfficeMax," he adds. "Like many successful entrepreneurs and operators at this stage, I live to work rather than work to live," says Feuer. "I love the challenge, thrive on naysayers telling me it can't be done, and get great satisfaction in proving the pessimists wrong. I won't presume to understand the psychological reason why anybody does anything, but the simple answer for me is that I put lightning back in the bottle because I know I can. There's nothing more gratifying to me than starting from scratch and building a meaningful and relevant business, and if it's a giant, so much the better." "Navigating a start-up venture is about as close as you can get to a 24/7 ride on the world's scariest roller coaster," says Feuer. Michael Feuer cofounded OfficeMax in 1988 starting with one store and $20,000 of his own money, a partner, and a small group of investors. As CEO, he grew it to more than 1,000 stores worldwide with annual sales topping $5 billion. He is also CEO of Max-Ventures, a venture capital and retail consulting firm, and cofounder and CEO of Max-Wellness, a comprehensive health and wellness retail chain that launched in 2010.


VirtualMarketingOfficer Blog » Law Firm Management Ideas | The Benevolent Dictator

virtualmarketingofficer.com [cached]

A few days later I was contacted by book publicist Kevin Small, requesting a review of an advance copy of a new book, The Benevolent Dictator, by Michael Feuer, co-founder of OfficeMax and founder of Max-Wellness.
What a coincidence! Feuer suggests that you can jump start acceptance by explaining the issue and the anticipated fix by using a logical, positive tone and focusing on the good rather than the bad. However.... Michael Feuer co-founded OfficeMax in 1988, starting with one store and $20,000 of his own money. During a 16-year span, Feuer, as CEO, grew the company to almost 1,000 stores worldwide with annual sales of approximately $5 billion before selling this retail giant for almost $1.5 billion in December 2003. In 2010, Feuer launched another retail concept, Max-Wellness, a first of its kind chain featuring more than 7,000 products for head-to-toe care. Feuer serves on a number of corporate and philanthropic boards and is a frequent speaker on business, marketing and building entrepreneurial enterprises. "The Benevolent Dictator," chronicles his step-by-step strategy to build business and create wealth. Published by John Wiley & Sons in late spring 2011.


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