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Wrong Michael Feuer?

Michael H. Feuer

Co-Founder and Co-Chief Executive Officer

Max-Wellness LLC

HQ Phone:  (216) 765-2500

Direct Phone: (216) ***-****direct phone

Email: m***@***.com

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Max-Wellness LLC

4400 Renaissance Parkway Suite 4

Cleveland, Ohio,44128

United States

Background Information

Employment History

Contributor

Small Business News


Chief Executive Officer

Warrensville Heights City Schools


Chairman and, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder

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First Nation Bank


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Woodforest National Bank


President, Office Max

Certified Mail


Qwest Communications International Inc.


Chairman

CEO and Co-Founder of OfficeMax


Fabri-Centers of America


Affiliations

OfficeMax Inc.

Founder


Western Reserve Partners LLC

Board of Advisors Member


Search

Founder


HME company

Founder


Cleveland Leadership Center

Board Member


University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Member, Board


The Taylor Institute

Board Member


Newest Venture Max-Wellness

Founder


DataNetwork Inc

Founder


United Way Services

Board Member


PsyMax Solutions LLC

Chief Executive Officer


Cleveland Live , Inc.

Founder, Founder


Menorah Park Center for Senior Living

Board of Trustees


Cuyahoga Community College

Board of Trustees


Wal-Mart Stores , Inc.

Vice Chairman


Shaker Heights

Founder


Case Western Reserve University Weatherhead School of Management and University of Pittsburgh Katz Business School

Member of the Advisory Councils


Max-Ventures

Chief Executive Officer


Web References(113 Total References)


SMB Tips on Moving Your Idea to the Marketplace - SMB Opportunities - SMBnow.com

www.smbnow.com [cached]

But according to Michael Feuer, cofounder and former CEO of OfficeMax, the iron is not just hot; it's smoking.
And if you don't strike now, someone else just might beat you to it. "The perfect time to make your move is when everyone else is afraid to," says Feuer, author of the new book The Benevolent Dictator: Empower Your Employees, Build Your Business, and Outwit the Competition (Wiley, 2011, ISBN: 978-1-118-00391-6, $24.95,www.benevolentdictator.biz). "It's a lot like investing in the stock market-once everyone else starts jumping on the bandwagon, you've missed the window." The truth is, says Feuer (pronounced "Foyer"), entrepreneurial success isn't rocket science. It's not as scary as it sounds, Feuer assures readers. The "benevolent" part means always putting the entity, the employees, and, most importantly, the customer, first. In other words, you're focused foremost on doing the right thing for the right reasons, for all stakeholders. The "dictator" piece simply means that somebody in a new venture (i.e., you) has to recognize when debate, conversation, and analysis can't take you any farther. At that time you have to decide, "We're taking this fork in the road, for better or worse, and it's on my head." "With both OfficeMax and Max-Wellness, being the benevolent dictator provided the critical leadership necessary to take an idea and transform it into reality as fast as possible," says Feuer. "Asking is certainly much more difficult than getting; however, it becomes much easier if you can learn how to make a strong presentation and tell your story," notes Feuer. "Attention, interest, desire, and action are the key elements of selling-you can ask for or tell just about anything as long as you do so honestly and spell out the good, the bad, and the ugly." "No" means "maybe. The word "no" is just a synonym for "maybe. Feuer writes that this realization led him to train his teams to comprehend that the "no" you receive the first nine times is merely a disguised "maybe"-because the other guy is looking for a reason why not to proceed, or doesn't understand what you're asking. It's only after the tenth time-when the other person hangs up on you or walks out of the room and slams the door-that "no" really means "no." "I've seen it over and over: Hearing 'no' simply means that you haven't effectively or passionately explained what you need-or adequately expressed how your success will translate to their success," says Feuer. Feuer explains that at OfficeMax he had an army of customer service reps who were trained to do the right thing for the customer the first time around. Still, periodically, tenacious customers who were outraged by a perceived transgression made it their mission to reach the CEO directly. It was during those phone conversations that Feuer truly learned what listening to the customer really meant. "I would identify myself when I answered my phone, and the irate caller would, many times, launch into histrionics," he recalls. Feuer explains that he always incorporated this mindset into his SMB plans, right down to his daily activities. He'd start the day by handling his most difficult or unpleasant tasks first. With those out of the way, he'd take a management walkabout checking with staff members at all levels. Then he'd move on to thinking time, meeting with colleagues, or sometimes just schmoozing, bonding, or focusing on new and better ways to get things done. "I always tried to teach through my own example that the journey for everyone should be as much fun as the destination," says Feuer. "If there is a voice in your head that sounds like your mother and it's advising you not to hire a certain candidate, the voice is probably just your entrepreneurial instinct telling you to proceed with caution," says Feuer. "But beyond what I call the Mother Rule, there are ways to get job candidates to reveal their own crucial character traits. "One way I vet candidates is to ask them to provide a letter of interest outlining why they think they can get the job done, and what it would take to get them to join the organization," he adds. "Whether you have hit your stride or have reached a milestone, it's imperative to remember one thing: If you don't remain hungry to achieve continued success, you'll soon find yourself believing that you are as great as your last success," notes Feuer. "The key to fulfillment and continued success is knowing how and when to reinvent one's SMB and even personal life," says Feuer. "It's all about looking for that new twist or turn that might ignite a new burning in the belly. "That time arrived for me when I decided to sell OfficeMax," he adds. "Like many successful entrepreneurs and operators at this stage, I live to work rather than work to live," says Feuer. "I love the challenge, thrive on naysayers telling me it can't be done, and get great satisfaction in proving the pessimists wrong. I won't presume to understand the psychological reason why anybody does anything, but the simple answer for me is that I put lightning back in the bottle because I know I can. There's nothing more gratifying to me than starting from scratch and building a meaningful and relevant business, and if it's a giant, so much the better." "Navigating a start-up venture is about as close as you can get to a 24/7 ride on the world's scariest roller coaster," says Feuer. Michael Feuer cofounded OfficeMax in 1988 starting with one store and $20,000 of his own money, a partner, and a small group of investors. As CEO, he grew it to more than 1,000 stores worldwide with annual sales topping $5 billion. He is also CEO of Max-Ventures, a venture capital and retail consulting firm, and cofounder and CEO of Max-Wellness, a comprehensive health and wellness retail chain that launched in 2010.


VirtualMarketingOfficer Blog » Law Firm Management Ideas | The Benevolent Dictator

virtualmarketingofficer.com [cached]

A few days later I was contacted by book publicist Kevin Small, requesting a review of an advance copy of a new book, The Benevolent Dictator, by Michael Feuer, co-founder of OfficeMax and founder of Max-Wellness.
What a coincidence! Feuer suggests that you can jump start acceptance by explaining the issue and the anticipated fix by using a logical, positive tone and focusing on the good rather than the bad. However.... Michael Feuer co-founded OfficeMax in 1988, starting with one store and $20,000 of his own money. During a 16-year span, Feuer, as CEO, grew the company to almost 1,000 stores worldwide with annual sales of approximately $5 billion before selling this retail giant for almost $1.5 billion in December 2003. In 2010, Feuer launched another retail concept, Max-Wellness, a first of its kind chain featuring more than 7,000 products for head-to-toe care. Feuer serves on a number of corporate and philanthropic boards and is a frequent speaker on business, marketing and building entrepreneurial enterprises. "The Benevolent Dictator," chronicles his step-by-step strategy to build business and create wealth. Published by John Wiley & Sons in late spring 2011.


www.sbnonline.com

By: Michael Feuer |
Michael Feuer Co-founded OfficeMax in 1988, with $20,000. During a 16-year span as CEO, he grew the company to 1,000 stores worldwide with sales of $5 billion. In 2010, Feuer launched the unique wellness retail chain Max-Wellness.


www.marshallhr.hcareers.co.uk

By Michael Feuer with Dustin Klein
OfficeMax Cofounder and former CEO Michael Feuer gives some welcome advice on how to manage your difficult employees without sacrificing their productivity. Before you resign yourself to living in your own not-so-amusing TV show, OfficeMax Cofounder and former CEO Michael Feuer provides some commonsense management advice. “First, know that there is no need for you to waste your time with poor performers or high maintenance employees who have an inflated sense of their own importance and ability,â€� says Feuer (pronounced “Foyerâ€�), author of the new book The Benevolent Dictator: Empower Your Employees, Build Your Business, and Outwit the Competition (Wiley, 2011, ISBN: 978-1-118-00391-6, $24.95, www.benevolentdictator.biz). “It’s best to let them know straightaway that they aren’t a good fit for your organization. The dilemma, though, occurs when self-appointed superstars or other difficult types really are terrific and get the job done. And it’s even worse when they believe they’re irreplaceable, along with everybody elseâ€"including you.â€� Feuer knows what he’s talking about: He has launched a number of successful business ventures, including OfficeMax and his newest business, Max-Wellness, a new and unique health and wellness retail chain. The lessons he’s learned, as he writes in The Benevolent Dictator, have convinced him that leaders are most likely to succeed when their management style mirrors that of a benevolent dictator: At the end of the day, the “dictatorâ€� side of you calls the shots and makes the difficult decisions, but your “benevolentâ€� side does so while putting the interests of the organization, your team, and your customers ahead of your own. And though it’s not easy, this means reining in your hard-to-handle employees while still developing their talents. Michael Feuer cofounded OfficeMax in 1988 starting with one store and $20,000 of his own money, a partner, and a small group of investors. As CEO, he grew it to more than 1,000 stores worldwide with annual sales topping $5 billion. He is also CEO of Max-Ventures, a venture capital and retail consulting firm, and founder and CEO of Max-Wellness, a comprehensive health and wellness retail chain that launched in 2010.


www.sbnonline.com

By Michael Feuer
Michael Feuer co-founded OfficeMax in 1988. Starting with one store and $20,000 of his own money during a 16-year span, Feuer, as CEO, grew the company to almost 1,000 stores worldwide with annual sales of approximately $5 billion before selling it for almost $1.5 billion in December 2003 to Boise Cascade Corp. Feuer is CEO of Max-Ventures, a retail venture capital/consulting firm, and co-founder and co-CEO of Max-Wellness, a new health care product retail chain concept that launched in 2009. Feuer serves on a number of corporate and philanthropic boards and is a frequent speaker on business, marketing and building entrepreneurial enterprises. Reach him with comments at mfeuer@max-ventures.com.


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